Brady not planning on retirement any time soon

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Brady not planning on retirement any time soon

Tom Brady continues to be asked when he might retire. And he continues to shoot back with the same answer: Not any time soon.

The Patriots quarterback did an interview with Sports Illustrated's Extra Mustard recently and said that he doesn't pine for life after football.

"Well, I love doing it," Brady said. "I don't want to wake up and be bored. That's probably my greatest fear is to have nothing to do. What better job is there than to play quarterback for an NFL team, and certainly one that I've been on for a long time and had success with? I don't plan on giving it up any time soon."

Brady didn't talk much about football with SI. He did however hit on Twitter (why he doesn't have an account), the rumors about an impending third child (not happening . . . yet), and Gronk's party habits.

Here are the highlights:

On his starring role in the Funny or Die Underarmour commercial:
It was a lot of fun. I'm much more comfortable and confident running out on the field in front of 70,000 people instead of standing in front of a camera trying to say some lines. The people who do that as a profession are very talented because it's certainly not easy. It's something I do maybe once a year, and when I do it there are no expectations. I just have fun with it. I was just being an a--hole like my normal self. My teammates see that all the time. For me, it was easy to do that.

On if Gisele makes the calls on his haircuts:
She likes pretty much what I like. She leaves it to me. Every man should know, if you're comfortable and you like it, you should do it. Everyone always worries about what the girls think, what the guys think. If you like it, do it. To me, if you're trying to impress a girl, get a date, they're gonna like that more because you're a confident guy. That's what it comes down to.

On the rumors of a third kid:
I like working on it.

On joining Twitter:
My fear with joining is that I bore people. And I don't want to do that. If I have something to say, I want it to be meaningful. I think that's what's kept me away from it. And I'd feel pressure to tweet.

On the post-Super Bowl loss party pics that leaked:
Everyone's blowing off steam. It was unfortunate we were in a public place. I wish we, as players, had a private place to go. He's a great guy. He loves football. What he's accomplished over two years has been remarkable.

On if he thought someone might catch the Hail Mary at the end of Super Bowl XLVI:
You know, it's interesting because this is the first time someone's asked me that question. I threw it and when I let it go, I knew we were gonna have a chance. The ball got batted up in the air and I saw it tip 60 yards away from me, but then I got knocked down, so I fell to the ground and I saw the ball get deflected. Unfortunately, though, I looked over and saw the bad guys running on the field.

On if there's a rivalry with the Giants:
We play them every year in the preseason. Geographically, we're very close, so yeah, there's something to losing to them twice in the Super Bowl in the most meaningful game of the year and the most meaningful game of our lives. You think about some bad memories from games you lose and there's that blue uniform with white numbers. That's what you think about it.

Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

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Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

When the topic of Deflategate was broached on HBO's Any Given Wednesday with Bill Simmons, which debuted this week, Ben Affleck became all kinds of fired up.

"What they did was suspend Tom Brady for four days for not giving them his [expletive] cellphone," Affleck said. "I would never give an organization as leak-prone as the NFL my [expletive] cellphone . . . so you can just look through my emails and listen to my voicemails?"

Affleck grew up in Cambridge, Mass. and is a passionate Patriots fan. He made no attempts to hide his fandom, and his appreciation for Brady, as he and Simmons (also a Patriots fan) discussed the football-deflation controversy that has now lasted well over a year. 

Affleck, who said he would want to cast himself as Brady if ever a Deflategate movie was made, harped on the fact that the league wanted Brady to turn over his phone. 

"Maybe Tom Brady is so [expletive] classy and such a [expletive] gentleman," Affleck said, "that he doesn’t want people to know that he may have reflected on his real opinion on some of his co-workers."

Brady is waiting for the Second Circuit to make a decision as to whether or not it will rehear his case against the NFL. Earlier this offseason, the Second Circuit reinstated Brady's four-game suspension issued by the league when a three-judge panel ruled in favor of the NFL, 2-1. 

Pro Football Talk wrote on Thursday that a decision from the Second Circuit could come at any time. If the rehearding request is denied, Brady could then take the case to the Supreme Court. Should the Second Circuit grant Brady a rehearing, his suspension would be delaed until the court reached a decision. In that case, Brady could potentially play the entire 2016 season before a decision came to pass. 

Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

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Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

Tom Brady wasn't always the most famous person in his family. Growing up, his sisters were the accomplished athletes in the household. 

For his latest Throwback Thursday style Facebook post, Brady published a pair of photos of an old high school essay that he wrote in the fall of his senior year in 1994. It was titled "The way my sisters influenced me."

I found an essay I wrote in 1994... I love my big sisters! #tbt. Thanks for the good grade Mr Stark!

Posted by Tom Brady on Thursday, June 23, 2016

In it, he discusses some of the difficulties of growing up with three older sisters and no brothers. Because Maureen, Julie and Nancy Brady had achieved so much in softball, basketball and soccer, Brady -- or "Tommy," as he signed his paper -- had trouble getting noticed. 

Of course, it wouldn't be long before Brady was headed from San Mateo, California to Ann Arbor, Michigan in order to play football for the Wolverines. He probably had no trouble garnering attention by then. Still, it's funny to read about how he felt overlooked in his youth. 

He closed the essay explaining that he knew his sisters would always provide him support throughout his life, adding, "hopefully, just maybe, one day people will walk up to them and say, 'Aren't you Tommy's sister?' or 'Hey where is your brother?' Maybe . . . "

If the Brady sisters didn't get those kinds of comments by the time the baby of the family was given an 'A' for his English assignment, it probably didn't take long before they did. About seven years later, he took over as the starting quarterback of the Patriots.