Brady 'desensitized' to roster cuts

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Brady 'desensitized' to roster cuts

FOXBORO --The Titans have had seven quarterbacks spin in and out since the last time they met New England. When the Patriots creamed Tennessee at home, 59-0, Kerry Collins and Vince Young split the snaps. Now, second-year QB Jake Locker is at the helm with Matt Hasselbeck, Rusty Smith, Chris Simms, and Chris Johnson, hitting the roster at points in between.
To consider the turnover, and consequently his own longevity, Tom Brady shrugged.
"There's turnover every year on our team, on every team -- coaches, players, staff, and so forth -- so I don't think about it too much. I think I learned at a young age that you worry about what you can control and certainly, playing quarterback, my attitude is what I think about on a daily basis."
There's been enough turnover in the Patriots locker room.
Last Friday, the day NFL rosters were cut to fit into that 53-man mold, Brady said three particularly significant goodbyes. Dan Koppen, starting center since 2003; Deion Branch, one of the quarterback's favorite targets; and Brian Hoyer, Brady's backup for the last three years. All three were felled in one axe-swing.
What do you do? Keep playing.
"I think in some ways you become a bit desensitized to it," Brady admitted. "Its not my decision, so I cant really think about it too much other than supporting your friends and what theyre going through. But its not like I can go in and lobby for guys; Its what decisions have been made or what coach always feels is in the best interest of the team. You just try to worry about going out there and doing your job.
"And we had practice that day, so we went out and practiced and you try to have a good practice regardless of who is out there because if you dont, you're really doing a disservice to yourself, your teammates and the franchise. You have to go out and compartmentalize things and go out there and have good practices and ultimately be prepared for the game."
Oh, and it didn't take Brady 13 seasons to realize he wasn't in charge.
"I think you realize at a young age that you really dont know what you dont know, so you see guys in the springtime that have great spring camps," he smiled. "I remember my second year, we had a receiver, Aaron Bailey, that was pretty good. I thought, Man, this guy is really good, and then we released him and I couldnt believe it. Man, we released that guy. He's the one that made all the plays.
There's a reason you don't remember Bailey. Brady knows that now.
"That's just what happens. You see a lot of players come and go and you just learn to deal with it, learn to live with it, and you understand, like, what my job is its challenging enough as it is. I dont have to worry about too many other jobs."

Are Patriots still 'pissed off' at Ravens for Deflategate role?

Are Patriots still 'pissed off' at Ravens for Deflategate role?

The Patriots should always be motivated heading into games against the Ravens. After all, Baltimore might be the team’s primary rival. 

Yet Monday’s matchup might be about more than past meetings. It could be a revenge game for the Ravens’ role in the Deflategate fiasco. 

As Tom E. Curran notes in the above video, the then-recently eliminated Ravens set off the ordeal when they tipped off the Colts entering the 2014 AFC Championship game. From there, the year-and-a-half-long saga played itself out, ultimately resulting in Tom Brady accepting a four-game suspension from the league. 

Curran and Mike Giardi discussed whether Monday could be a revenge game, with them both concluding that they feel the Patriots are still “pissed off” at the Ravens. 

"I’m just reading the tea leaves,” Curran said. “Bill Belichick will usually throw bouquet after bouquet at the Baltimore Ravens any time they play, from Ozzie Newsome, to George Kokinis, to Eric DeCosta, to John Harbaugh, Dean Pees, everyone. Not a lot of that today. Make of that what you will; I don’t think it’s a coincidence because I do know that when the Patriots were going through the process early on, the fact that the Ravens had dropped a dime -- their assistant special teams coach Jerry Rosburg calling the Indianapolis Colts and saying, “Look there was some foolishness going on with the K balls.’

“Additionally, when that email from the Colts to the NFL was sent to Mike Kensil, it said, 'It’s well-known throughout the league that the Patriots screw with the balls after they’ve been checked by the officials.' So if that conversation was going on during the week between those two teams, one certainly has to surmise that they also spoke about the fact of deflating footballs. 

“So as much as John Harbaugh has tried to dissuade anyone from thinking there was involvement, Dean Pees was interviewed by Ted Wells, Jerry Rosburg was interviewed by Ted Wells. Those are the only two principals from other organizations who were involved, so yeah, I think they’re still probably pretty pissed off about it.” 

What if Belichick had coached the Ravens? 'I think we would've been competitive'

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What if Belichick had coached the Ravens? 'I think we would've been competitive'

FOXBORO -- Ever wonder what might've been if Bill Belichick had remained the coach of the Browns, and later the Ravens, after they moved from Cleveland? He says he doesn't.

"I haven't spent a lot of time thinking about it, no," Belichick told Baltimore reporters during a conference call on Wednesday. "I try to think ahead and make the best of the situation that I’m in, which is what I tried to do when I was in Cleveland. I took a team that wasn’t very good in 1991, prior to free agency and all of that, had a real good team in 1994. The team moved in 1995."

The decision to move the team helped undo the Browns season in 1995, and Belichick was later fired. There's little denying, though, that he left the pieces of a competitive roster behind. And he helped stock the Ravens' cupboard with valuable assets.

Five years after Belichick's tenure in Cleveland had expired, the franchise won a Super Bowl with linebacker Ray Lewis -- drafted with a pick Belichick had acquired -- as its foundational piece. 

"We made a trade that provided two first-round picks that Ozzie [Newsome] did a great job with," Belichick continued. "Ozzie and Ray Lewis were two of the cornerstones of that eventual championship team.

"I have a lot of confidence in my ability, I had a lot of confidence in the coaching staff and the players that we had at that time – 1995 wasn’t obviously a great year for us. I don’t think we need to talk about that. We all know what happened. But yeah, I think we would have been competitive if I had been the head coach there. I think we would have been competitive. We had a good team, we had a good staff, and we had a lot of good players.

"Ozzie did a good job with that team and made it better, and they won a championship five years later [with] some of the same players that we started with. But you know, it wasn’t my choice, Ted [Marchibroda] came in there and was going to transition that for what they needed at that point in time. But I haven’t spent a lot of time thinking about it, no."