Brady answers dad's concern about injuries

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Brady answers dad's concern about injuries

As the father of three teenage sons, I'm learning how often divergent opinions arise. On everything from the suitability of a 13-year-old going to see "The Dictator" to icing an arm after pitching, debates -- and eye rolls -- are frequent.

Apparently, I better get used to it.

On Tuesday, I asked 34-year-old Tom Brady about his father's recent comment that Brady Sr., would be "very hesitant" to allow his son to play football if he had to do it all again.

"No, not without hesitation," Tom Brady Sr. told Yahoo! Sports' Michael Silver. "I would be very hesitant to let him play."

The younger Brady's reaction?

"Everybody has a different take," Brady said. "My dad is always happy to share his opinion with anybody that will ask, often contrary to my own beliefs."

Brady didn't sound annoyed. But he was emphatic.

"He's always a concerned parent and we as parents are always concerned about our kids," Brady pointed out. "You never want to see your kid fall down and bump his elbow. You're always concerned when things are out of your control as a parent.

"But there's no job I'd rather have in the world," he added. "I'm so fortunate to be in a job that's so fun for me every day. What football has taught me in the grand scheme of my life about being a part of a team and working with people and hard work, discipline and mental toughness - all those things that serve me in life. The lessons far outweigh anything I've experienced in terms of injuries."

As the conversation continues about the bodily toll the game extracts, it is worth pointing out that the game has never been safer in terms of equipment, teaching and awareness. That's at all levels.

For an NFL player like Brady who is -- in essence -- defenseless while looking downfield to throw, you have to reconcile yourself to the risks, he said.

"They are a part of our game and we're all taking precautions to try to limit the exposure to some of those things," Brady offered. "My hope is we all find the best way to treat ourselves and to rehab our bodies whenever injuries come up.

"I feel very strongly about getting your body in condition and keeping it in condition so we can play as long as we want to play, so that it's our decision to go out when we choose to and not have an injury force us out," he added. "But we all understand the risks and we have to do our best. I love playing this sport. It will be hard to give it up."

Belichick asked if playing at home helps: 'Go ask Dallas and Kansas City'

Belichick asked if playing at home helps: 'Go ask Dallas and Kansas City'

FOXBORO -- Bill Belichick knows that how you play, not where, is what matters most. 

That's why when he was asked on Wednesday about the advantage the Patriots will have by playing at Gillette Stadium in the AFC title game, he wasn't willing to go all-in on how a comfortable environment will positively impact his team.

"I don’t know," he said. "Go ask Dallas and Kansas City."

The Patriots apparently thought enough of home-field advantage that they played their starters throughout their regular-season finale win in Miami, exposing their best players to potential injury in order to maintain their positive momentum while simultaneously ensuring a better road to the Super Bowl. 

The Patriots fans in attendance on Sunday will help when the Patriots take on the Steelers, Belichick acknowledged. But there's much more to it than that. 

"Yeah, of course," he said, "but the game is won by the players on the field. That’s who wins football games – the players. And they’ll decide it Sunday night."

And if you needed any further proof, just ask the Cowboys and Chiefs how helpful their home crowds were in the Divisional Round. 

Tomlin not letting up on Brown after ill-advised Facebook Live video

Tomlin not letting up on Brown after ill-advised Facebook Live video

FOXBORO – Mike Tomlin didn’t sidestep questions related to Antonio Brown’s ill-advised locker room broadcast.

Instead, Tomlin actually seemed to up the ante during a conference call with New England media. Asked whether Brown seemed to get the message that Tomlin delivered and take it seriously, Tomlin said, “I think time always tells those stories.”

Tomlin easily could have used a “we’re moving on” message or talked about how Brown simply made a youthful mistake but he opted not to. Which isn’t surprising.

The number one criticism of Tomlin is that the Steelers head coach runs a loose ship and that the lack of discipline and accountability is a big issue.

Seeing Brown run a live broadcast from the locker room while Tomlin’s trying to make a point doesn’t just keep that perception afloat, it advances it to a place it’s never been.

It’s not a stretch to say that Brown’s actions imperiled Tomlin’s reputation. There’s no wonder he isn’t willing to let Brown off the hook.

Brown addressed the controversy on Wednesday saying, “I absolutely regret the Facebook Live situation. It’s a total distraction to the organization. A total distraction to my teammates. Obviously disrespect to my coach. I’ve got utmost respect to my coach so I totally regret that.”

Tomlin on Tuesday went as far as to suggest other players doing team-distracting things like Brown wind up getting passed around the league despite their great talent. “That's often why you see great players move from team to team,” said Tomlin. “Don't want that to happen to Antonio Brown.

Tomlin expressed embarrassment that the language he used in the postgame in the privacy of his locker room was served up for public consumption.

“As a parent, I’m not into public displays of that type of language so I was more embarrassed about that aspect of it not necessarily the content or the message of the video,” said Tomlin.

As to referring to the Patriots as “those a*******,” Tomlin said, “Man, you could have applied that sentiment to any opponent. You could have made that tape two weeks earlier and applied it to that opponent. It’s not about the nameless great faces that we play, it’s about our overall preparation and that was the sentiment of the message that I was sending to the guys not necessarily about the New England Patriots, they just happened to be who we’re playing this week.”

Tomlin also addressed the time element he referenced in his postgame speech when he said the Patriots had a day-and-a-half head start on his team. 

“I was just trying to instill a sense of urgency in our group regarding preparation and I wanted them to understand that we didn’t have a lot of time to pat ourselves on the back based on the performance of the last game,” he explained. “That we needed to transition and transition quickly and start the preparation, whether it was actual preparation or just from a mentality standpoint.”

Because of Brown’s decision, it’s probably been a lot harder to make that transition than Tomlin ever hoped.