Belichick: Brady was once protected from cuts

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Belichick: Brady was once protected from cuts

New England's tight schedule of three preseason games in 10 days has had an interesting effect on roster cuts.
Bill Belichick explained Thursday on his conference call.
"When you're playing once a week then you have a chance to practice everybody and play everybody in different increments during that game. The advantage of that is you get to see those players -- let's just say you did it in all three games -- in three different schemes, three different types of match ups with the other team, where we played kind of a split squad thing in the last three weeks. Probably the amount of plays is about the same, close to the same, but it was more segmented.
"I think overall it worked out to about the same number of plays, but you just didn't see some guys against Philadelphia and you didn't see some guys against Tampa, and you didn't see some guys against the Giants just compared to last year's preseason games. Practice-wise, some of the same things."

If having an extra day between preseason Game 4 and Friday's 9 PM cutdown deadline has any impact on the decision making, Belichick said it's "marginal." The coaches have been aware of date for months and have been evaluating accordingly.
Though there's a lot to think about.
"When you get to a certain point of your roster you look at whatever the number is, say 46, those are the guys that are going to go to the game, those are the guys that are going to play. Probably in that group you have a couple of players that may be injured, so to start the season maybe they wouldn't be able to play, but eventually you think they will be healthy and able to play.
"Maybe it's 50 players. Somewhere over 46 and somewhere less than 53, whatever that number is. Then you have basically depth and insurance for your team. So, you can have a player on your team that is on the 53 man roster, but he's not going to play on the team until you get to the 46, and then whatever the criteria that would get him to the 46 man roster-- is it special teams, is it injury, is it development of him because if it was just inexperience, do you feel like he could potentially grow into that role -- and then you need players on the practice squad, whoever they are."
Belichick pointed to OL Nick McDonald, who was picked up last September after being released by Green Bay, and Dolphins waiver Matt Kopa as depth players who joined the team from other sources. The value of such practice squad players is high because they're in the meetings and learning the system just like everybody else.
"You've seen them be activated as late as Saturday afternoon for a Sunday game," said Belichick. "It comes down to a question of where you want to carry your depth, in terms of what it costs -- what it costs financially, what it costs in terms of opportunity. You keep a person for depth here, does that leave you shorthanded somewhere else? Of course it does. So which players can you control? Well, you can control the ones on the 53, you can control the ones on the practice squad, not totally, but to some degree."
Not knowing what the team will need, or when the team will need it, is the very basis of what makes cuts so complicated. But maintaining some semblance of control is huge.
Take quarterbacks for example. In the past, the Patriots have kept as few as two. This season they will likely keep three in Tom Brady, Brian Hoyer, and Ryan Mallett.
Could there be any conceivable reason to hang onto four? In 2000, there was.
"Kind of a unique situation, we had really two third quarterbacks between Brady and Michael Bishop. One of them could have been on the practice squad. In any case, we could have carried one of those guys on the practice squad, but, again we had 53 players and if you're going to have the inactive group anyway . It really doesn't matter whether the guy is on the practice squad or the 53 man roster -- if he's inactive, he's not going to play in the game.
"So then the question is, as an organization, which players do you want to protect? You can protect the ones on the 53, to some degree you can't protect the ones on the practice squad. In that particular case, that's why we didn't put Brady on the practice squad -- we wanted to make sure we had him, not so much for that year, but for the following year."
Turns out that was a wise move.
Belichick is hoping his judgment is similarly sound this week. There's just no way to know until the Patriots, and every other team in the league, is knee-deep in the season.
"There are a lot of considerations that come into play. We'd like to keep more than 53. We keep 61 when you add the practice squad. There's other players we'd like to keep working with, but we're just not going to be able to do that. We have to decide, what do we do that's best for the team?"

Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

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Affleck offers passionate Brady defense when asked about Deflategate

When the topic of Deflategate was broached on HBO's Any Given Wednesday with Bill Simmons, which debuted this week, Ben Affleck became all kinds of fired up.

"What they did was suspend Tom Brady for four days for not giving them his [expletive] cellphone," Affleck said. "I would never give an organization as leak-prone as the NFL my [expletive] cellphone . . . so you can just look through my emails and listen to my voicemails?"

Affleck grew up in Cambridge, Mass. and is a passionate Patriots fan. He made no attempts to hide his fandom, and his appreciation for Brady, as he and Simmons (also a Patriots fan) discussed the football-deflation controversy that has now lasted well over a year. 

Affleck, who said he would want to cast himself as Brady if ever a Deflategate movie was made, harped on the fact that the league wanted Brady to turn over his phone. 

"Maybe Tom Brady is so [expletive] classy and such a [expletive] gentleman," Affleck said, "that he doesn’t want people to know that he may have reflected on his real opinion on some of his co-workers."

Brady is waiting for the Second Circuit to make a decision as to whether or not it will rehear his case against the NFL. Earlier this offseason, the Second Circuit reinstated Brady's four-game suspension issued by the league when a three-judge panel ruled in favor of the NFL, 2-1. 

Pro Football Talk wrote on Thursday that a decision from the Second Circuit could come at any time. If the rehearding request is denied, Brady could then take the case to the Supreme Court. Should the Second Circuit grant Brady a rehearing, his suspension would be delaed until the court reached a decision. In that case, Brady could potentially play the entire 2016 season before a decision came to pass. 

Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

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Brady posts high school essay to Facebook on living in his sisters' shadow

Tom Brady wasn't always the most famous person in his family. Growing up, his sisters were the accomplished athletes in the household. 

For his latest Throwback Thursday style Facebook post, Brady published a pair of photos of an old high school essay that he wrote in the fall of his senior year in 1994. It was titled "The way my sisters influenced me."

I found an essay I wrote in 1994... I love my big sisters! #tbt. Thanks for the good grade Mr Stark!

Posted by Tom Brady on Thursday, June 23, 2016

In it, he discusses some of the difficulties of growing up with three older sisters and no brothers. Because Maureen, Julie and Nancy Brady had achieved so much in softball, basketball and soccer, Brady -- or "Tommy," as he signed his paper -- had trouble getting noticed. 

Of course, it wouldn't be long before Brady was headed from San Mateo, California to Ann Arbor, Michigan in order to play football for the Wolverines. He probably had no trouble garnering attention by then. Still, it's funny to read about how he felt overlooked in his youth. 

He closed the essay explaining that he knew his sisters would always provide him support throughout his life, adding, "hopefully, just maybe, one day people will walk up to them and say, 'Aren't you Tommy's sister?' or 'Hey where is your brother?' Maybe . . . "

If the Brady sisters didn't get those kinds of comments by the time the baby of the family was given an 'A' for his English assignment, it probably didn't take long before they did. About seven years later, he took over as the starting quarterback of the Patriots.