And then there was Brady

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And then there was Brady

This morning, Matt Light finally delivered the message that we've been expecting all spring

He's retiring.

As they say, he's walking away from the game while he still can, and leaves behind an undeniable legacy. He was Tom Brady's Blind Side. A cornerstone of the Patriots dynasty.

And while it's obviously a little sad to see Light hang them up, you can't help but be happy for the guy. Some players struggle with this kind of decision, but Light is very clearly at peace. He's really looking forward to his life after football.

If you didn't read his farewell message in this week's Monday Morning Quarterback, I highly recommend doing it now. (It's about halfway down the page).

Here's a quick excerpt:

"I didn't grow up wanting to play football. Never thought a college would pay for me to join their team. The draft was just a reason to throw a party and I'd never seen a pro football game in person until I played in one. Yet, this unbelievable journey has provided my family and I with more than we could ever ask for and the ability to help those around us. That is the biggest victory of my career and why I will forever be grateful to the Patriots organization and the NFL."
First of all, I think I know why it took so long for Light to announce his retirement he was writing this letter. (Or maybe I'm just saying that to compensate for insecurities about a professional football player being a gooder writer than I am). Second, just an unbelievably message from Light. Honest. Genuine. I feel like I understand him better at this moment, than I do any athlete in this city. Light completely reveals himself here (in a non-trench coat kind of way), and somehow comes across even more likable than he already was.

However, there's one slightly weird and unfortunate consequence to Light's retirement.

Tom Brady's now the only player left from Super Bowl XXXVI.

I know, I know. Kevin Faulk's still around. But he has as good a chance to make the team as you do. It's only a matter of time until he holds a press conference of his own.

Which leaves Brady as the lone wolf from that original ring, and as one of only four players to win any kind of ring in New England. (Other 3: Dan Koppen, Vince Wilfork and Deion Branch, who's no guarantee to make the team either).

In a way, it makes sense that there are so few champions left at Gillette. It's been seven years since the Pats won it all, and the length of the average NFL career is about 15 minutes. And at the same time, it's only fitting that Brady and Belichick are the only two dominant figures that remain from the night the Pats shocked the world in New Orleans.

Still, it's just crazy to think back on all that's happened and ultimately changed in the 10 years since. It makes me feel very old.

Not as old as Matt Light feels after 11 years of playing left tackle in the NFL, but here's to getting out before it's too late.

On that note, I'd like to announce my retirement from CSNNE.com.

Press conference coming tomorrow.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Julien sidesteps job security question with "shock journalism" comment

Julien sidesteps job security question with "shock journalism" comment

BOSTON -- With three crushing losses in a row at a time when results are really all that matters, the Boston Bruins are reeling at the wrong time during the regular season. The B’s tried their best to win a game 0-0 with strong defense against a sleepy Chicago Blackhawks bunch on Friday night, but ultimately coughed up a Marian Hossa goal in the final minutes for a 1-0 regulation loss at TD Garden.

The defeat continued a swirl downward for the Black and Gold over the last week, and was a second straight shutout loss on home ice for the first time in almost 15 years. The losing stretch has also kicked up the chatter that Claude Julien is in trouble as head coach of the Bruins, and the hockey club’s underperformance up and down the lineup is ultimately going to cost the NHL’s longest tenured bench boss his job.

The Ottawa Senators have passed the Bruins in the Atlantic Division, and it’s only a matter of time before the Toronto Maple Leafs move by them as well with both Toronto and Ottawa holding six games in hand on Boston. Combine all of this with the B’s having missed the playoffs in each of the previous two seasons leading into this one, and it shouldn’t be at all surprising that Julien is squarely on the coaching hot seat.

The B’s bench boss was asked about his job security after the Chicago loss, and clearly didn’t appreciate the tough, but appropriate question.

“Well, I’m not into shock-journalism,” said Julien in a prideful tone. “So I’ll stay away from that question if you don’t mind.”

The Bruins posted their Saturday schedule shortly after Julien and the B’s players had addressed the media following the loss, and sure enough the embattled coach is scheduled to address the media post-practice as part of the regular practice day routine. So it doesn’t seem that a move with Julien is imminent this weekend despite another loss, but both the coach and the players know something is going to happen to shake things up with this team if they continue to struggle.

“Right now it’s a results based situation, so if you’re going to keep losing games then probably something’s going to happen,” said Torey Krug. “But right now we’re just pretty down emotionally after this game, so I don’t want to look at the big picture. I just [want to] focus on what’s going on in this room, and hopefully we can come back with a good effort the next game.”

A good effort might help Julien’s standing with the Bruins in the short term, but it’s impossible to imagine the B’s bench boss making it through the rest of the Bruins regular season given all of things working against him right now.