Wilcox to host golf outing in support of Lupus foundation

Wilcox to host golf outing in support of Lupus foundation
July 31, 2012, 9:07 pm
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Missing most of last season after heart surgery in the spring was a major jolt emotionally for Chris Wilcox.

But it pales in comparison to the Celtics forward has endured in his personal life -- the kind of pain that he's trying to prevent others from having to experience.

His latest effort will kick into high gear on Friday with the Fourth Annual Chris Wilcox Golf Charity Outing at the Myrtle Beach (S.C.) National Golf Club.

There will also be a silent auction that will include autographed items from many, including Celtics all-stars Kevin Garnett and Rajon Rondo.

The proceeds will benefit the Lupus Foundation of America.

This particular disease hits home for Wilcox, who inked a one-year deal to return to Boston earlier this month.

"It's been something that's been in my family a long time," Wilcox told CSNNE.com in a phone interview.

Wilcox lost an aunt to the disease about 20 years ago.

Since then, a number of family members that includes his sister Tehesia, have tested positive for the autoimmune disease that does not have a cure.

Those with the disease have an immune system that can not differentiate between healthy tissues in the body and germs or bacteria. So the antibodies that the body produces to fend off harmful microorganisms, are also attacking healthy tissues, which leads to discomfort, inflammation and a series of potential complications to other vital organs such as the kidneys and lungs.

"I try to do whatever I can to slow it down," said Wilcox, who said his tests for the disease came back negative. "I have cousins that have it as well."

The Lupus Foundation of America estimates that 1.5 million people and 5 million worldwide, have some form of Lupus.

And while it can affect both men and women of all ages, 90 percent of those with the disease are women according to the Lupus Foundation of America with most ranging between 15-44 years of age. In addition, studies have found that certain ethnic groups (people of African, Asian, HispanicLatino, Native American, Native Hawaiian, or Pacific Island descent) have a greater risk of developing the disease.

"It's definitely something that's close to me," Wilcox said. "But there are so many other families dealing with it, too. I'm just trying to do whatever I can to help so hopefully we can find a cure or at least find a way to slow it down."

For more information, you can check out Chris Wilcox's website at www.chriswilcox54.com or the home page for the Lupus Foundation of America.