What's Green worth?

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What's Green worth?

While Jeff Green's contract with the Celtics is still officially unofficial, Danny Ainge reiterated yesterday in Vegas, that the C's and Green have agreed on a four year deal worth 36M.

It's a contract that many in the basketball world feel is absurd for a relatively-unproven, soon-to-be-26-year-old who missed all of last season after heart surgery.

And I agree.

On one hand, I understand why the Celtics made signing Green a priority. It's the same reason they traded for him in the first place: Because they desperately needed another small forward and Green was the best available and most versatile option.

He also fits in well with the changing face of this team. You can already see him running back and forth with Rajon Rondo and Avery Bradley, while the out-of-breathe opposition thinks to themselves: "Holy crap. What the hell happened to the Celtics?"

That's the best case scenario. And you know that's what Danny Ainge and the Celtics are banking on. They believe that Green was put in an awful position two seasons ago. That he was never comfortable within Boston's system. They believe that his time shadowing the team last season will help the chemistry, and that a fresh start will lead Green to realize a level of potential that many deny even exists.

But anyway you cut it, 36M is a lot to gamble on potential. It's only fitting that Ainge made the announcement in Las Vegas.

Speaking of which, David Falk (Green's agent), was in Las Vegas as well. And according to this story in the Herald he had a message for all those who believe Green's unworthy of the new deal:

I had a (team personnel executive) that I met with last week who had told me that if we took a dime less under 13 million dollars a year for Jeff Green he should fire us, Falk said.

He continued: The truth is I think Jeffs market value was several million dollars more (over the course of the four years) than what he signed for . . . he accepted a deal that I think is very fair, but I dont think is as much as he could have gotten.

Hmm . . . it's up to you how much you're willing to believe the words of an agent. Especially when he's talking about one of his own clients. But who knows? With the ridiculous deals and moronic GMs that exist in this league, maybe it's possible that someone out there was actually willing to give Green 13M a year.

But here's the point: It doesn't matter now.

Regardless of whether andor why he accepted less money to play for the Celtics, Green still has to prove that he's even worth what he "settled" for. No one in Boston will have sympathy for him turning down 13 million if he plays like a guy who deserves six.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

How the 1956 draft changed the Celtics franchise

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How the 1956 draft changed the Celtics franchise

We take a look at how the 1956 Boston Celtics draft landed them three All-Stars and changed the franchise forever.

Avery Bradley elected to NBA All-Defensive First Team

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Avery Bradley elected to NBA All-Defensive First Team

BOSTON -- It seems that while Avery Bradley comes back every season with something new that he’s added to his game offensively, his defense has always been solid.

But this past year, Bradley, 25, was more committed to being not just a great on-the-ball defender, but also to expanding his game at that end of the floor to be a better help defender, too.

Bradley’s efforts didn't go unnoticed. The NBA announced Wednesday that he was among the players named to the NBA’s All-Defensive First Team.

It was Bradley's first time being named to the first team. His only other all-league recognition defensively came in 2013, when he was named to the league's second unit.

Bradley's play certainly was pivotal in his selection. But it didn't hurt that Portland's C.J. McCollum praised Bradley via social media as the best perimeter defender in the NBA.

"I don't think it's close," tweeted McCollum. 

San Antonio’s Kawhi Leonard was the lone unanimous choice on the first team. In addition to Leonard and Bradley, the first team also included Golden State’s Draymond Green, Los Angeles Clippers big man DeAndre Jordan, and Jordan’s teammate Chris Paul.

Of the first-team players, Bradley was third in total points (149), which included 62 first-team votes and 25 second-team votes. The only players with more first-team votes were Leonard (130) and Green (123).

Players were awarded two points for a first-team vote and one point for a second-team vote.

The All-NBA Defensive Second team included Paul Millsap of Atlanta, Paul George of Indiana, Hassan Whiteside of Miami, ex-Celtic and current Memphis Grizzlies guard Tony Allen and Chicago’s Jimmy Butler.

Bradley wasn’t the only Celtic to receive some all-Defensive love from voters. Jae Crowder had a total of 47 points, which included 3 first-team votes. His 47 points were the third-highest among players not named to the first or second team.  Also, Celtics guard Marcus Smart received seven points which included 2 first-team votes.