Knicks lights-out shooting too much for Celtics, 118-110

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Knicks lights-out shooting too much for Celtics, 118-110

NEW YORK Right corner. Left corner. Right wing. Left wing.

It didn't matter where the New York Knicks were shooting 3's from. Just about everyone of them ended up in the same place - bottom of the net.

And that more than anything else, resulted in the Boston Celtics losing 118-110, to the Knicks.

Boston came into the game as the league's top team in 3-point percentage defense with opponents shooting just 29.1 percent against them this season.

Somebody must have not told the Knicks, who blistered the Celtics in the first half on 14-for-21 shooting on 3's.

But the Celtics, as they have done time and time again, managed to make things interesting in the third quarter as they trimmed New York's lead down to as little as 10 points on multiple occasions.

The C's couldn't break through, as New York went into the fourth quarter leading, 96-84.

Boston had their chances in the fourth to make it a single-digit game, but failed repeatedly to get the necessary basket or the much-needed defensive stop.

Boston finally got the Knicks lead into single digits following a pull-up jumper by Paul Pierce (43 points) with 4:04 to play, making it a 112-104 game.

The C's run was aided by Carmelo Anthony being on the bench after picking up his fifth personal foul early in the fourth.

Pierce continued to carry the C's on the comeback trail, as he drew a foul driving to the basket. He made both free throws with 3:07 to play, cutting New York's lead to 112-106.

But the Knicks responded with what else? a 3-pointer that put them up by nine points. A lay-up by Rajon Rondo was followed by another Knicks 3-pointer which made it a 10-point game with 2:03 to play.

Boston has managed to compensate for having a man or two down before, but New York's three-guard offense hit the Celtics exactly where they were most vulnerable.

The C's were hoping to have Ray Allen (ankle) back, but he was ruled out shortly before tip-off. Boston was also without Mickael Pietrus who had swelling his right knee and was sent back to Boston before the game.

Without those two, the Celtics were without their best perimeter scorer off the bench (Allen), as well as their best perimeter defender (Petrius) at the wing position.

To the Knicks credit, they recognized this shortcoming of the Celtics and took full advantage of it with crisp ball movement and a barrage of 3-pointers from all points on the floor.

Boston tried to keep the game within striking distance by launching a few 3s of their own, which included a pair of 3s from Rajon Rondo in the first half.

But New York's seemingly non-stop diet of 3-point basket after 3-point basket, buried the Celtics in the kind of first half hole that few teams ever climb back out of and become competitive, let alone rally for the win.

First impressions: Ortiz moves past pregame ceremonies, hits game winner for Sox

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First impressions: Ortiz moves past pregame ceremonies, hits game winner for Sox

BOSTON -- First impressions from the Red Sox' 5-3 win over Toronto:

* What's left to say about David Ortiz?

Ortiz acknowledged before Friday's game that the pre-game ceremonies and the attendant fuss over his pending retirement have created a challenge for him. Sometimes, it's hard to go from being feted to trying to win a game.

Not that you would know it by Friday night.

In his first at-bat, he singled home the first run of the game. Two at-bats later, he lined a bullet that was right at Jose Bautista.

But he saved his best for the seventh when, after the Red Sox tied the game at 3-3, Ortiz promptly untied it with a laser down the line, landing in the right field seats.

One more clutch hit from Ortiz in a career full of them.

* Brock Holt's defense at third has stood out.

John Farrell is looking for someone to step up with the third base job, given that Travis Shaw is hitting under .200 since the All-Star break and Aaron Hill has had difficulty hitting righties.

Holt, meanwhile, has seized the job somewhat by default, with a .319 average in the last 24 games.

But since starting the last four games at third, Holt has also contributed with his glove.

On Friday night, Holt made a fine stop with his backhand, on the third base line, and fired to nail Devon Travis on a close play at first.

Later, he came on a slow roller to gun down Josh Donaldson out at first.

* The Red Sox have done a better job of late capitalizing on opponents' mistakes.

Last week in Baltimore, the Red Sox were handed a gift by the Orioles when a throwing error by Chris Davis resulted in five runs being scored -- all of them unearned. It took exactly two pitches for the Red Sox to pounce on the opportunity.

On Friday night, it happened again.

Trailing 3-1, the Red Sox used a throwing error by Russell Martin to score one run and put another runner in scoring position. A groundout and single by Mookie Betts tied things, and Ortiz's homer broke the tie and gave the Red Sox a lead they wouldn't relinquish.

Good teams take advantage of mistakes. Two of the last six Red Sox wins are prime examples of that maxim.

Ehrhoff signs a PTO with the B's after World Cup

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Ehrhoff signs a PTO with the B's after World Cup

The Bruins will add another veteran defenseman to their training camp group fresh off the World Cup of Hockey as German D-man Christian Ehrhoff is headed to Boston on a PTO (professional tryout agreement). CSN has confirmed that Ehrhoff has indeed agreed to a PTO with the Bruins, and he'll report to the team sometime this weekend.

The 34-year-old Ehrhoff had three assists in six World Cup games for Team Europe, and had two goals and 10 points in 48 games for the Los Angeles Kings and Chicago Blackhawks last season while clearly starting to slow down a bit. He’s clearly no longer the player that averaged 14 goals and 47 points for the Vancouver Canucks from 2009-2011, and is another left-shot defenseman to add to a team that already has Zdeno Chara and Torey Krug.

But it behooved the Bruins to bring in at least one “name” veteran D-man on a tryout basis during this training camp with so many needs for upgrades on the back end, and with a host of young players that might not be ready for prime time. This might also be a warning sign for young veteran Joe Morrow, a left shot D-man that has struggled a bit in training camp after coming off an erratic first full season at the NHL level.

Clearly the Bruins need more than Ehrhoff, however, even if he’s somehow re-energized with the Bruins after playing pretty well in the World Cup. The Kings were down enough on his game to put him through waivers last season, but he was a top-4 defenseman for the previous eight seasons for San Jose, Vancouver, Buffalo and Pittsburgh prior to getting bounced around between the Kings and Blackhawks last season.

The added bonus with taking a look at Ehrhoff is that there’s no risk associated with a PTO, and the Bruins can simply walk away with no cost if the B’s coaching staff decides he’s not a good fit for the group in Boston. On the other hand, bringing in a Kris Russell-type would cost a great deal in terms of money and term in a free agent contract, and it might not benefit the Black and Gold club in the end result.