As KG's World Turns

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As KG's World Turns

So, we here go: The latest on the Kevin Garnett Retirement Watch is that the Celtics aren't concerned with getting an answer before tomorrows draft.

Sure, KG's presence is only the determining factor in how the team approaches both its immediate and long term future, but what the hell . . .

Dont worry, Kevin. Take your time.

"It's not like we have the No. 1 pick," Doc Rivers said yesterday. "When you're in the 20s, you just wait and see what comes to you. I think this is a great draft. Where we're picking, we'll be able to get two very good players."

OK, I get that to an extent. Either way, youre not finding anyone at 21 or 22 to fill KGs shoes. Not now, and probably not ever.

But here's my issue: Doesnt the potential absence of Kevin Garnett affect what you might do with those picks?

Let's be honest: Whether or not Danny ends up trading 21 andor 22, you know he's going to talk to everyone. He'll explore every option. And there's no question that if KG retires, it creates a whole slew of other options. Tons of uncharted avenues. Lotta ins. Lotta outs. A lot more strands to keep in old Danny's head.

For instance, if KG comes back, there's no chance that the Celtics would or could ever consider trading Paul Pierce. Out of the question. If KG retires? They'd be crazy not to explore the possibility. And what better time to explore than tomorrow, when there will be a million parts flying back and forth, when teams are both ready and willing to shake things up and the Celtics just happen to own two first round picks.

Bottom line: By not knowing what Garnett will do by tomorrow, it will severely handcuff Danny Ainge on a night when he could start legitimately laying the groundwork for the post-KG Celtics.

So, why aren't they concerned with knowing what he'll do?

Because they already know. That's the only logical explanation.

That regardless of whether there's an official announcement before tomorrow, the Celtics and everything they've said publicly supports this are ready to operate under the assumption that Garnett will be back for an 18th NBA season.

Obviously, that's just my opinion.

But if I'm wrong, then the Celtics are very wrong.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Bradley (Achilles) 'felt good' during return to Celtics lineup

Bradley (Achilles) 'felt good' during return to Celtics lineup

WALTHAM, Mass. – As the final horn blew in Boston’s 108-98 win over Charlotte on Monday night, the game was a win-win kind of night for Avery Bradley.

The Celtics (26-15) continue rolling over opponents at the TD Garden, and he played a relatively pain-free 33 minutes in the win.

It was Bradley’s first game back after missing the previous four with a strained right Achilles injury.

And the fact that he was back on the practice floor on Tuesday (be it a light practice, mind you), bodes well for his injury being a thing of the past now.

“I felt good. It wasn’t sore at all in the game,” Bradley said. “I felt I was moving good. After the game I was a little sore and this morning, but otherwise I felt good.”

Despite Boston being 4-1 this season when Bradley doesn’t play, he has immense value to this Celtics team at both ends of the floor.

Offensively he has been Boston’s second-leading scorer most of this season and currently averages a career-high 17.7 points per game along with 6.9 rebounds which is also a career high.

And defensively, Bradley is coming off a season in which he was named to the NBA’s all-Defensive First Team for the first time.

Any questions or concerns about the Achilles affecting his play defensively were put to rest Monday night when he put the defensive clamps on Nicolas Batum who missed nine of his 11 shots from the field while primarily being guarded by Bradley.

Now his offense, that’s another story.

Bradley failed to reach double digits scoring for the first time this season as he missed seven of his nine shots on Monday to finish with just five points.

But part of that had to do with Bradley passing up shots he normally takes, as well as him missing some he normally knocks down.

Considering his lay-off and the rhythm his teammates have been in shooting the ball in his absence, Bradley wisely decided to get his defensive bearings on track and gradually bring his offensive game around. 

“I have to get my (shooting) rhythm back,” said Bradley who is making a career-best 40.9 percent of his 3-pointers this season. “I’m fine. I’m looking forward to tomorrow’s game.”