Jefferson: 'It's always good to come back'

Jefferson: 'It's always good to come back'

BOSTON -- On March 28, 2007, the Boston Celtics beat the Orlando Magic in double overtime at TD Garden for the 22nd victory of their 24-win season. Captain Paul Pierce led the team with 32 points, seven rebounds, and five assists while up-and-coming big man Al Jefferson posted a double-double with 23 points and 13 rebounds. Rookie Rajon Rondo added six points, five rebounds, and five assists.

Fast forward to March 28, 2012.

The Celtics beat the Utah Jazz, 94-82, in regulation on the parquet. Captain Paul Pierce scored 20 points and six rebounds while the now-All Star point guard, Rajon Rondo, dished 14 assists along with six points and four rebounds. On the opposing end, Jefferson, currently in his eighth season and third NBA team, posted a double-double with 18 points and 12 rebounds.

The trio were the only members from the 2007 Celtics squad on the court together five years later.

As Jefferson made his return to Boston, he still found a sense of familiarity in the place he called home for the first three seasons of his career.

It seems like many years ago, many, many years ago, but its only been, what, five, six years ago, he said after the game. Every time I come back, its always good to come back and play on this court.

Jefferson was the centerpiece of the multi-player deal which sent Kevin Garnett from the Minnesota Timberwolves to the Celtics in the summer of 2007. The Cs went on to win a title that season. Jefferson, on the other hand, spent three seasons on losing Timberwolves teams before being traded to the Jazz in 2010.

On Wednesday night, Jefferson and Garnett were called for double technical fouls against one another. But there are no feelings of bitterness on Jeffersons end. Double techs or not, he respects the future Hall of Famer he was sent to Minnesota for.

That was Kevin being Kevin, Jefferson said. Hes been here long enough to know how he operates. Its just him. But I got mad respect for Kevin, great player. He made a way for me, being drafted out of high school, thats all I have to say about that.

He continued about the trade, It was an honor. Thats something Ill tell my grandkids one day, that I got traded for one of the best players to ever play the game. Thats the way I look at that.

Jefferson was not only impacted by the player he was traded for, but also the ones still in Boston. Entering the NBA as a teenager following his senior year of high school, Jefferson tried to soak up everything he could learn from Pierce. The veteran leader of a young squad, Pierce pulled off moves his teammates would need years to perfect.

Playing with Paul Pierce was an honor because I watched him growing up, said Jefferson. I always thought he had -- Joe Johnson had that same kind of game. He doesnt move up or speed up for anybody. Paul plays his pace.

Everybody always asks me, Whered you get that ball fake from? I got it from Paul Pierce. I used to always watch how he set up that ball fake and thats where I stole it from him. So it was always an honor playing with him.

In addition to Pierces proven experience, Jefferson also saw something in the Celtics young point guard. He played just one season with Rondo, but it was enough time for Jefferson to realize Rondo would make a name for himself.

Rondo, when he was a rookie, you saw it, he said. You knew that he was going to be something special, just like I did in Kevin Love. Now, seeing him do what he has done, I guess Im not really surprised by it because I saw it. He was in a great opportunity and he turned out to be a very, very, very special player. Im glad I had a chance to experience that and have that little time with him.

Jefferson crosses paths with his former teammates who have since left the Celtics as he travels throughout the league. And regardless of how many of them are still playing in Boston, returning to the city where he started his NBA career makes him appreciate his place in the NBA.

Everybody is pretty much gone except for Paul, Rondo, and (head coach) Doc (Rivers), he said. But thats how it goes. It seems like every time I play a game, I see somebody I used to play with. But at the end of the day, its a blessing to still be in this league. It might not be with the same team, but at least youre still in the league.

Haggerty: Bruins would be foolish to deal away Carlo right now

Haggerty: Bruins would be foolish to deal away Carlo right now

There’s been smoke for weeks signaling trade talks between the Boston Bruins and the Colorado Avalanche, and things are reportedly heating up with the Bruins potentially reaching a tipping point with their subpar play on the ice. According to Bleacher Report columnist Adrian Dater, things may be progressing between the two teams because the Bruins are beginning to entertain the idea of trading away 20-year-old top pairing rookie defenseman Brandon Carlo.

Bruins Director of Player Personnel John Ferguson Jrwas expected to be out in Colorado scouting the Avalanche/Blackhawks game on Tuesday night, and perhaps getting a long look at players like Gabriel Landeskog, Matt Duchene and Tyson Barrie among others.

The expectation is that 24-year-old Landeskog is in the middle of these trade discussions, and that he would be one of the players targeted by a Bruins team that could use more size on the wing, and more players that can put the puck in the net. Certainly Landeskog has done that in his brief NHL career after being a No. 2 overall pick, and has four 20-goal seasons on his resume prior to a disappointing, injury-plagued current season in Colorado.

The word around the league was that talks fizzled between the Bruins and Avs previously when Joe Sakic asked about the availability of the Colorado Springs native Carlo, and those discussions hit the same crunching roadblock that Winnipeg did in discussions with Boston about Jacob Trouba.

Perhaps that has changed in the last 24 hours after Cam Neely and Don Sweeney watched their Bruins completely no-show against the worst team in the Eastern Conference, the New York Islanders, on Monday afternoon. Now one would expect that Bruins management is getting desperate feeling that a third “Did Not Qualify” for the Stanley Cup playoffs could be in their future if they don’t make a bold, swift move to shake up their dazed hockey club.

But let’s not pull any punches here. The entire Bruins management group should be fired on the spot if they trade a 20-year-old, top pairing shutdown defenseman on an entry level contract like Carlo unless they are getting a bona fide superstar in return. Carlo, Charlie McAvoy and David Pastrnak should all be young, untouchable assets for a Bruins organization that is years away from legitimately holding a chance at a Stanley Cup.

Landeskog is not a bona fide superstar. He’s a good player that’s topped out at 26 goals and 65 points in the NHL, but he’s also the Captain on a horrendous, underachieving Avalanche team over the last three years.

If the price were right for Landeskog it would make all the sense in the world for the Bruins to deal him, but it’s a giant honking red flag that Colorado is looking to unload a player like him that’s signed for a reasonable $5.5 million price tag over the next four seasons. Teams don’t trade young players like that with term unless there’s more to the story, and that’s something the Bruins would do well to consider before giving up a player that could be a top-4 shutdown defenseman in Boston for the next 10 years.

Teams like the Bruins that are in reloading mode also shouldn’t be trading 20-year-old players for 24-year-old players that have already cashed in on their second contract. That’s exactly how the Bruins can get right back into salary cap trouble, and do it with a team that’s producing far less than the Peter Chiarelli groups that were at least still making the playoffs.  

Certainly the Bruins have other young D-men like Charlie McAvoy, Jakub Zboril and Jeremy Lauzon coming down the pipeline, but none of those defensemen are in the mold of a true shutdown D like the 6-foot-5 Carlo. With Zdeno Chara in the final few years of his career with the Black and Gold, the B’s are going to need Carlo to slide into that defensive stopper role given his size, strength, wing span and willingness to do the dirty work the D-zone.

That goes beyond the simple fact that rebuilding the back end with ALL of those young stud D-men is the best way to actually build the Bruins back up into a legitimate Eastern Conference power. 

It would be a giant mistake for the Bruins to ship away a player like Carlo with the hope Landeskog can put Boston over the hump for the playoffs this season, and perhaps ease some of the intense pressure currently weighing on Sweeney and Neely. That kind of desperate move smacks of doing it for all of the wrong reasons, and that’s one way to ensure that the Bruins will never escape the web of mediocrity that they’re currently caught in.