How about them Heatles?!

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How about them Heatles?!

They lost by not one, not two, not three, but 19 POINTS last night in Indiana, and in the process, provided the Heat Haters with ammunition for days. Or at least two, at which point Miami will re-take the court and either right their shaky ship or slam into an iceberg.

Right now, it certainly feels like theyre heading towards the latter, but we all know better than to assume that much. The way things go, Miami's just as likely to re-group and win a title as they are to choke away another post season. And as fans, the best thing we can do is borrow a mind eraser from one of those million Men In Black 3 ads, take it to the head and move on with clear, unbiased conscience.

However, there was one aspect of Miamis Game 3 debacle that especially as it relates to the Celtics is worth a closer look.

The third quarter altercation between Dwyane Wade and Erik Spoelstra.

If you didn't catch it, here's the video. In it, you'll see Wade and Spo on the sidelines, face-to-face in a heated conversation. After a few seconds, Wade dismissively nudges Spoelstra aside and walks away with his recently trademarked sourpuss. At this point, Spoelstra shoots out one more verbal dagger, which clearly hits home, and leads Wade to circle back around to get in his coach's face. Thankfully (for the Heat), team grandfather Juwan Howard intercepts Wade, and the Captain settles on bitching out his coach from a far.

And that's a wrap. It was a beautiful thing. Just another step in Wade's transformation from the only likable piece of Miami's super team to the main source anger and hatred. Congrats, Dwyane!

Anyway, I said I'd bring this back to the Celtics, so here we go: At this point, it's obviously too early and altogether ridiculous to speculate about a CelticsHeat Eastern Conference Finals. It seemed so easy before the second round got under way, but now that we're in the thick of things you know, both teams have other stuff to worry about.

BUT, we're human. Even if both the C's and especially the Heat have their hands full, you can't help let your mind wander to that would-be ECF. I think it's still the most likely match-up. Deep down, I think it's still the outcome that we all want to see.

Miami vs. Boston.

One last hurrah. And if we ever get there, here's one undeniable advantage in the Celtics corner: The relationship with their coach.

As we're well aware, the Celtics would do anything for Doc Rivers. They'd take a charge. Run through a wall. Would they kill a man? YES. Anything. And when the game, the season, contracts, careers and legacies are the line regardless of any sort of drama that may be swirling around the locker room the Celtics believe in their coach.

And while one ugly incident doesnt say everything about the relationship between Dwyane Wade and Erik Spoelstra, or Spoelstra and the rest of the team, it does say a lot.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Former Celtics teammates praise Garnett's passion and intensity

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Former Celtics teammates praise Garnett's passion and intensity

WALTHAM, Mass. – Like so many players who have spent part of their NBA journey having Kevin Garnett barking in their ear words of encouragement or just telling them to get the hell out his (bleepin’) way, you can count Avery Bradley among those who will miss the man affectionately known as ‘Big Ticket.’

Garnett recently announced his retirement after 21 NBA seasons, leaving behind a legacy that includes an NBA title won with the Boston Celtics in 2008.

Among the current Celtics, Bradley is the only current member of the team who played with Garnett in Boston.

When Bradley got the news about Garnett’s retirement, he said he sat down and wrote Garnett a letter.

“To let him know how much I appreciate him, how special he is to me,” said Bradley who added that his relationship with Garnett was impactful both on and off the court. “Kevin’s just an amazing person.”

Leon Powe, a member of the Celtics’ championship team in 2008 with Garnett, echoed similar praise about his former teammate.

“As a teammate, as a player, KG meant the world to me,” Powe told CSNNE.com. “Intensity … he brought everything you would want to the game, to the practice field, he was just non-stop energy.”

And when you saw it time after time after time with him, pretty soon it became contagious.

“The intensity just motivated every guy on the team, including me,” Powe said. “It made you want to go out and lay it out on the line for him and the team. You see how passionate he is. You see he’s one of the greats. And when you see one of the greats of the NBA going hard like that all the time, you’re like ‘Man, why can’t I do that? It trickled down to me and every young guy on the team.

Powe added, “He brought that every single day, night, morning, it didn’t matter. He brought that intensity. That’s all you could ask for.”

And Garnett’s impact was about more than changing a franchise’s fortunes in terms of wins and losses.

He also proved to be instrumental in helping re-shape the culture into one in which success was once again defined by winning at the highest levels.

“KG has had as big an impact as anybody I’ve been around in an organization,” said Danny Ainge, Boston’s president of basketball operations. “The thing that stands out the most to me about KG is his team-first mentality. He never wanted it to be about KG, individual success to trump team success. He lived that in his day-to-day practice. That’s something I’ll remember about him.”