Garnett reaches 25,000 points in Celtics' win over Lakers


Garnett reaches 25,000 points in Celtics' win over Lakers

BOSTON There will come a time when the game will eventually pass Kevin Garnett by.
And with each milestone he passes, that time becomes closer.
Thursday was yet another accomplishment for Garnett, who joined one of the more exclusive clubs in NBA history.
At the 8:08 mark in the second quarter of Boston's 116-95 win over the Los Angeles Lakers, Garnett scored his sixth point of the night, which punched his ticket into the 25,000 career point club. He finished with 15 points and now has 25,009.
The 25K club is one of the more exclusive fraternities in the NBA, now 16 deep with Garnett.
"I'm sure someday I'll fall back and rock in my rocking chair having a cigar, thinking about what I've done," Garnett said. "I'm sure it will make some sense to me."
Garnett's ascension to being one of the NBA's all-time great scorers is an amazing feat for a player who has spent the bulk of his career taking great pride in being one of the league's elite defenders.
But with most of his career spent in Minnesota, Garnett had little choice but to become a high-volume scorer ... and rebounder ... and assist man ... and just about every job imaginable for the Timberwolves except tossing t-shirts into the stands during time-outs.
Since arriving in Boston prior to the 2007-2008 season, Garnett has been tasked with anchoring a Celtics defense that has been among the NBA's best annually.
For the 36-year-old, that is as ideal a fit as he could have.
But in achieving this latest milestone, it speaks volumes as to how talented Garnett is as an all-around player.
Only 15 players to ever suit up in the NBA have scored more than Garnett, and yet the imprint he leaves on most games is at the defensive end of the floor.
"You know what's funny is he's a great offensive player," said Celtics coach Doc Rivers. "But that tells you he's so good defensively that you rarely hear about Kevin being a great offensive player."
As much as Garnett deserves to be praised for what he has done in the NBA as a scorer, he'll be the first to acknowledge that his success offensively involves so many other folks.
Said Garnett: "I told Doc when I came here to all the coaches and ex-players and current players and systems and organizations, this great organization that I play for, I'm more than honored, because without the systems and the coaches, and obviously players that put you in a position to score the basketball none of this would be possible."
And making it even more special was that it came with at least one family member more than usual at the game.
"You know my family, my baby, she got to be at the game tonight and see it. Thank you for snow days," Garnett said. "She got to come to the game tonight which is kind of unusual, so it was good to have her here. It was great."

Celtics hope to rebound after being outplayed by Bulls on the boards

Celtics hope to rebound after being outplayed by Bulls on the boards

Following Thursday’s 105-99 loss to the Chicago Bulls, the Boston Celtics will be on the prowl to rebound – literally – from its first defeat of the season.

Because for all that did not go right in Thursday night’s loss, the way Boston was beaten on the boards stands out emphatically.

“They got 24 more shots than us. We only turned it over (12) times,” Celtics head coach Brad Stevens told reporters after the loss. “So that’s the obvious place they’re getting their possessions, on the glass. That’s going to be the number one thing, that has been the number one thing. It’s something we’ve talked about. We have to get better at it.”


Boston was out-rebounded 55-36 on the boards which heavily factored into Chicago’s 18-5 advantage in second-chance points.

In the Celtics' 122-117 win over Brooklyn on Wednesday, Boston won the overall rebounding battle 47-44, but had just 12 offensive rebounds compared to Brooklyn's 15 offensive boards. Despite the close margin, the Nets won the battle on the offensive glass running away, outscoring the Celtics 23-13 in second-chance points.

Stevens decided to start Tyler Zeller ahead of Amir Johnson to begin the third quarter, hoping Zeller would be a better matchup on the glass than Johnson who did not grab a single rebound in the 11 minutes of court time he got in the first half.

While Zeller did do a few good things on the glass and scoring in half-court sets, it wasn’t enough to swing the momentum Chicago was steadily gaining due to its ability to control the boards.

“I wasn’t real surprised but at the same time I knew it could happen,” Zeller told reporters, referring to Stevens’ decision to have him start the second half. “They did a good job of coming out and setting the tone. They beat us up on the boards, especially the first half. It’s something we have to get better at and continue to grow at.”

And it’s not a one-player or one-position issue, either.

Usually we think of bigs when it comes to rebounding. But Boston’s guards need to step up their rebounding game as well.

The struggles thus far have to be put in the context of this being just two games, the latter being the season opener for the Bulls who were jacked up more than usual due to it being the first game for Chicago native Dwyane Wade and ex-Celtic Rajon Rondo.

“We have to focus on boxing out,” said Boston’s Jaylen Brown. “Guards have to do a better job. Guys like me, Al (Horford), Amir (Johnson), Tyler (Zeller) ... We have to do a good job of coming in the weak side and grabbing those; just focus on it, pay more attention to detail.”