Doc: 'We'd rather stay where we're at'

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Doc: 'We'd rather stay where we're at'

SAN FRANCISCO You can add Boston Celtics coach Doc Rivers to those who breathed a collective sigh of relief when the trading deadline passed and the Celtics didn't make a single move.

"Obviously, there were conversations as always," Rivers told Comcast SportsNet shortly before the team departed for Sacramento, Calif., on Thursday afternoon. "There were more calls coming in, then were going out. Just none of them made sense. We like our team, and we'd rather stay where we're at."

Rivers spoke of the ever-growing camaraderie and resolve that the Celtics have shown through what has been at times a tough and tumultuous season.

"It's just a good group, a good group to coach," Rivers said. "And the future will say how good we are as a basketball team."

Even though the trading deadline has passed, that won't prevent the C's from continuing to search for more frontcourt help, something Rivers acknowledged was at discussed often with other teams on Thursday.

"If we could have gotten a big, we would have gotten that," Rivers said.

The sticking point for the Celtics and most NBA teams looking to make a deal, centered around how to handle first-round draft picks.

"The way everyone is projecting this draft to be so strong, so no one wanted to give up picks," Rivers said. "And all the deals from everybody had that in mind."

Danny Ainge, Boston's president of basketball operations, made it clear that any interest in the Big Four would require teams to give the C's a package that would have to include a future first-round pick.

"(Other teams) were interested in our better players; that's easier to say then names," Ainge said. "But they weren't offering what we wanted. We just like our guys."

Still, Rivers and the Celtics still have an eye towards adding size to the roster.

A number of players were waived on Thursday to create roster spots for other players acquired via trade. Among them being former Celtic big man Chris Johnson, who was waived by Portland.

Rivers said the C's would certainly keep an eye out for any big men that become available either by being waived, or through a buy-out.

"Things like that, could happen," Rivers said. "But with the buy-out, you have to compete with other teams."

The most logical player for the C's to acquire via the buy-out process, is New Orleans center Chris Kaman.

He has been on the trading block for weeks, but the NBA-owned Hornets did not reach a deal.

"I would say if there's a big that's bought out and he looked at the roster, we'd be very attractive ... there's guaranteed minutes," Rivers said.

But if a deal can't be struck to add another big man, Rivers isn't overly concerned about his team's chances just as long as they can go into the postseason in relatively good health.

"If we started the playoffs playing the rotation that we have, we're good," Rivers said. "We only play three or four players anyway, as far as your bigs. Right now, we're doing that so we're good there. But if we can add another big, that would be nice."

First impressions: Pomeranz is better, but Red Sox fall to Tigers

First impressions: Pomeranz is better, but Red Sox fall to Tigers

First impressions from the Red Sox' 4-2 loss to the Detroit Tigers:

 

1) The same problem remains for Joe Kelly

As a starter, no one doubted Kelly's fastball, and the velocity with which he threw it. But the problem was, Kelly's fastball was often quite straight, and most major league hitters can hit a fastball without movement, no matter how hard it's thrown.

In his first appearance as a reliever for the Red Sox, the same problem reared its head.

Kelly started off Justin Upton with a 99 mph fastball. After an 89 mph slider, Kelly next threw a 101 mph fastball.

But Upton drove it on a line to the triangle for a triple, and two batters later, trotted home on a soft flare to center by James McCann.

Velocity is one thing and can produce some swings-and-misses. But ultimately, Kelly is going to need more than straight gas to get hitters out.

 

2) Drew Pomeranz was miles better in his second start

Pomeranz failed to get an out in the fourth inning of his Red Sox debut and was charged with five runs.

So when Pomeranz -- who allowed just one hit through the first three innings Monday night -- allowed a leadoff single to Miguel Cabrera to start the fourth, there was uneasy sense of deja vu at Fenway.

But Pomeranz quickly erased Cabrera on a double play and through five innings had allowed just three hits and a walk.

He got into some trouble in the sixth when he allowed a one-out, two-run homer to Jose Iglesias, erasing what had been a 1-0 Red Sox lead.

But Pomeranz was far sharper than his first outing, threw his curveball for more strikes and kept the Tigers mostly off-balance. His line (6 IP; 4 H; 2 ER; 2 BB; 7 K) will be more than good enough on most nights.

Just not Monday night.

 

3) They may lead MLB in runs scored, but there are still nights when the Red Sox offense can frustrate

It happened last Friday when they loaded the bases with no out against the Twins - and failed to score in a 2-1 loss.

It was more of the same Monday night when the Sox loaded the bases in the ninth -- and managed just one run.

The problems weren't limited to the ninth, of course. The Sox put the leadoff man on in both the seventh and eighth innings -- and didn't score.

For the game, the Sox left 11 men on and were just 2-for-10 with runners in scoring position.