Digging the Draft


Digging the Draft

The excitement. The drama. The picks. The trades. The genius. The idiocy. The uncomfortable interviews. The hilarious entourages. The gut-wrenching Green Room. The suits designed by Stevie Wonder on LSD. My God, the UPSIDE!

Ladies and gents, its the NBA Draft. And if youre a sports fan, theres nothing like it.

Its not drawn out over four Chris Berman-burdened days like in the NFL. Its not jam-packed with hundreds of high schoolers who will never make it or wont be heard from for years like in baseball and hockey. Its one night, two rounds, 60 players all looking to make an immediate impact. All ready to realize a lifelong dream, and change the course of their lives and this game as we know it.

OK, maybe thats an overstatement, but who cares? Especially since for the first time in a long time, Celtics fans dont have to live vicariously through the excitement of others.

Lets face it: Its been a while since weve had reason to get excited about the draft here in Boston. That's what happens when you have great teams, with few needs and crappy draft positions; when the immediate future of your franchise is already set in stone.

But this year is different. Regardless of what happens with Kevin Garnett, the future of the Celtics is cloudier than it's been since Draft Day 2007. Sure, the page hasn't entirely turned on this era of excellence (although KG could change that), but it's getting close. Throw in Boston's two first rounds picks and a draft class that's deeper than Michael Sweetney's belly button, and we're all expecting the Celtics to make some noise.

How, and with whom? Your guess is as good as mine. You've heard the same names, watched the same highlights and scoured the same mock drafts: Royce White. Jared Sullinger. Andrew Nicholson. Terrence Jones. Fab Melo. Quincy Miller. Jared Cunningham. Tyler Zeller (Oooh! I like that kid, says every Celtics fan over 45). Acie Earl. Joe Forte. They're all on the Celtics radar. They all might help in some way, shape or form. Then again, they all might be off the board by the time Celtics pick. In a way, that takes some of the wind out of our sails. But on the other hand, it just adds to excitement.

That as much as you and I and everyone outside of the Celtics war room will spend the next eight hours trying to makes sense of what might happen, we just don't know. And on top of that, the Celtics don't know either. They can fall in love with as many players as they want. They can make promises or not make promises or build a high-speed bus to cruise Royce White around the country. No matter who the Celtics want, if one of 17 teams Houston, NO and Portland all have multiple picks before Boston want him first than the C's are SOL. It's a scary proposition, but creates so much anticipation. It will leave us at home, on the couch, remote in hand, slamming on the fast-forward button, just begging for a way to make it all happen faster.

And then there are trades. We haven't even talked about trades! With the Celtics there will always be trades, or at least rumors of trades. When you consider Danny's pension for wheeling and dealing, and Doc's proven reluctance to rely on younger players, there's nothing close to a guarantee that the Celtics stay where they are in the draft. Adrian Wojnarowski is already reporting that Boston's aggressively trying to move up into the lottery and turn the potential for two quality young players into one big time baller. And the reports won't stop there. We'll be hearing rumors right up until the moment David Stern creeps up to the podium for the 22nd time.

It's going to be chaos.

It's going be awesome.

Despite months of preparation, and weeks of speculation, for two-plus hours we'll watch the Celtics future unfold, unscripted and in real time. No doubt the results will leave us talking to tomorrow, and will be felt for years to come.

It's the NBA Draft. It's time to get excited.

Rich can be reached at rlevine@comcastsportsnet.com. Follow Rich on Twitter at http:twitter.comrich_levine

Celtics nearly blow fourth quarter lead, hold on to beat Nets, 122-117


Celtics nearly blow fourth quarter lead, hold on to beat Nets, 122-117

BOSTON –  The Boston Celtics are not used to being the hunted, or holding a comfortable lead over teams they should beat easily.

That inexperience nearly cost them their season opener against Brooklyn which rallied back from a 23-point deficit to within a field goal of tying the game in the final seconds of play.

But the Celtics managed to hold on for a 122-117 win.

For most of the game, it went according to the script many would have expected to see played out on the TD Garden floor.

Brooklyn put up a good fight, Boston got it together in the second half and the game is over.

Not so fast, says the Nets.

Head coach Brad Stevens tried to rest his starters in the fourth, but the Celtics’ second unit simply didn’t get it done as they nearly squandered a commanding fourth quarter lead.

It was somewhat fitting that they were on the floor to finish off the pesky Nets considering they were the main reasons why Brooklyn was in such a deep fourth quarter hole.

With the win, the Celtics are now 44-27 all-time in season openers and 32-13 at home.

Making the win even sweeter was the fact that because it was so decisive, it allowed head coach Brad Stevens to rest most of his core players who will return to the floor Thursday night to play the Chicago Bulls.

Celtics all-star guard Isaiah Thomas was in double-double range most of the second half before finishing with 25 points, nine assists and six rebounds.

Boston also got a strong night from Jae Crowder who had 21 points on 9-for-15 shooting to go with four rebounds and two assists.

And while the numbers weren’t all that impressive, Al Horford delivered the kind of performance that speaks to his ability to impact the game positively for Boston in a multitude of ways.

He finished with 11 points on 5-for-8 shooting to go with five rebounds and six assists in just 25 minutes of action.

Depth was a strength of the Boston Celtics last season, and it seems to be an even bigger weapon for them now.

Celtics head coach Brad Stevens went 10-deep in the first half with each Celtic who stepped on the floor in the first two quarters scoring at least two points.

The Nets came in as heavy underdogs, a team that many anticipate will be among the worst in the NBA this season.

“We can’t worry about that stuff,” Brooklyn’s Trevor Booker told CSNNE.com prior to Wednesday’s game. “The big thing for us is to go out and compete, give ourselves a chance to be successful.”

Brooklyn did just that for most of the Wednesday’s game, but Boston’s talent and depth proved to be too much.

Crowder got things poppin’ at the start of the game by making his first four shots from the field.

But the Nets didn’t buckle, but instead got a multitude of players chipping in with a bucket here or defensive stop there to keep the game from getting out of hand.

Brooklyn’s Jeremy Lin, a former star at nearby Harvard, was among the Nets players keeping the game relatively close. He finished with 18 points.

But the second half was once again dominated early on by Crowder who scored in a variety of ways which included stealing an in-bounds pass and banking in a mid-range jumper in the third quarter.

That play was part of a 26-16 run by Boston to close out the third quarter which ended with the Celtics ahead 97-81.

Brooklyn continued to play scrappy basketball in the fourth, but the Celtics had built up too big a cushion for the Nets to present any kind of real threat to Boston’s control.

Halftime stars, studs and duds: Celtics in control, but Nets within striking distance


Halftime stars, studs and duds: Celtics in control, but Nets within striking distance

BOSTON – The Boston Celtics were in control most of the first half, but the Brooklyn Nets managed to stay within striking distance most of the first half which ended with the Celtics ahead, 64-58.

It was a high-scoring first half, the kind that one of the league’s top defenses shouldn’t experience.

But it is the first game of the season and the Celtics clearly have some kinks defensively to work out.

The Celtics led by as many as 13 points in the first half with contributions coming from several players in the starting unit as well as off the bench.

Boston has spent a good chunk of the preseason preaching the importance of good ball movement.

It was indeed on full display as Boston had 19 assists in the first half on 23 made baskets.

As for the Nets, Bogan Bogdanovic kept Brooklyn within striking distance most of the first half as he tallied 10 points through the first two quarters of play. Brooklyn also got a nice lift from Justin Hamilton who had 14 first-half points off the Brooklyn bench.

Here are our halftime Stars, Studs and Duds



Isaiah Thomas

Thomas was a more assertive player in the second quarter and it paid off for the him and the Celtics. He finished the half with a team-high 11 points in addition to doling out a game-high seven assists.

Jae Crowder

Boston displayed some crisp ball movement in the first half, and Crowder seemed to benefit from this more than any other Celtic. Through two quarters of play, Crowder has a team-high 10 points which included him making his first four shots from the floor.



Sean Kilpatrick

The Nets only have five players on their roster from last season’s disastrous 21-win club, and Kilpatrick showed why he’s one of the few holdovers. At the half, he had nine points off the bench to go with three rebounds.



Brook Lopez

He’s supposed to be the Nets’ best player, but you would not have known this by his play in the first half, The 7-foot Lopez was a non-factor through the first two quarters of lay, missing four of his five field goal attempts to go into the half with just three points.