C's must walk fine line with aggressive play

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C's must walk fine line with aggressive play

MIAMI The Boston Celtics have every intention of being more aggressive in tonight's Game Two matchup with the Miami Heat.

But if you're looking for a Dexter Pittman 2.0 moment, or a Udonis Haslem retaliation, WWE-style takedown, you will be disappointed.

"We're not trying to do that," said C's coach Doc Rivers. "We don't want to, hopefully, foul."

Following the C's Game One loss, point guard Rajon Rondo talked about the need for the Celtics to be more physical tonight and at times make Heat stars LeBron James and Dwyane Wade "hit the deck."

Not surprisingly, Rondo's comments took on a life of their own.

Both Rondo and the C's were in clarification mode afterward.

"You guys take the words and you run with it," Rondo said. "But this is basketball. Nothing dirty about I hit the deck every day. You go to the hole, you're going to get fouled, you're going to hit the deck. I didn't say flagrant. I didn't say take them out, play dirty. It's basketball."

Specifically, the Celtics want to take away, by Rivers' count, the 19 uncontested or lightly contested lay-ups by the Heat.

"We're not saying we want to foul them 19 times," Rivers said. "We don't want them to get to the basket. When we say we have to take away lay-ups, we're not saying we need to take away them, r take out them. We're saying we need to slide our feet, move them off, keep them out of the paint."

But there is a balance that has to be struck between playing with the kind of force needed to compete, but not getting into a foul-inducing, hacking brand of basketball that at times was prevalent in Miami's previous playoff series against Indiana.

"It's not about getting technicals or things of that nature," said Boston's Paul Pierce. "It's about being a little bit more scrappy to loose balls; not allowing layups, that kind of physicality, boxing out, no second shots. Getting your hands dirty in the paint, getting tough baskets. That type of stuff. It's not about going chest-to-chest or getting technical fouls. That's not toughness to me at all."

Evan Turner: 'Hopefully it’s not my last game in a Celtics uniform'

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Evan Turner: 'Hopefully it’s not my last game in a Celtics uniform'

BOSTON - With 44.7 seconds remaining in Thursday's Game 6 loss to the Celtics, Evan Turner was removed.

His hope is, though, is that it's not the last time he walks off the court as a member of the Boston Celtics.

Turner, who signed a 2 year, $6,703,510 contract with Boston two offseasons ago is now headed for unrestricted free agency, and after two successful seasons in Boston in which he turned his game around, is due for a bit of a pay day.

Will Celtics President of Basketball Operations Danny Aine be the guy who gives it to him? Turner hopes so, but at this stage it's too soon to say.

"I really don't know," Turner said about his future in Boston. "I would love to come back but at the same time, lot of things, lot of variables that are going to occur and things like that that I can't control. Whenever July hits we'll talk about it."

Turner knows that Ainge's job is to do what's best for the Celtics. In that same sense, Turner has to do what's best for him, which means joining a team that checks off all the boxes. So what are those factors?

"Just fit obviously," Turner said. "I want to get a decent amount of money, you know what I'm saying? But at the same time the fit is going to be huge and the opportunity to play on a winning team. I have played on [crap] teams a couple times and it's not fun. But obviously the fit, the opportunity to play, and the opportunity to progress and win."

It just so happens that Turner was able to do all those things in Boston. Just taking a look at his last contract, it's easy to see he wasn't wanted by many other teams in the NBA. Labeling Turner a "reclamation project" might be a bit of a stretch, but not by much. Either way, Brad Stevens was able to get to him and by the end of his two year deal was one of Stevens' favorite players, and one he counted on in just about every big situation.

Whether or not Turner does return to Boston, he knows how much Stevens has done for his career. Turner can expect to cash in on a deal that will earn him north of $10 million per season this summer.

"He's done a lot. He's a smart guy. He rekindled my fire for the game. Just enjoy it," Turner said.  I think he's definitely helped us all becoming better pros and doing the little things. I think everybody in this locker room he's put in positions to succeed so definitely appreciate that and most importantly off the court he's a great friend and great guy."

But the love goes beyond Stevens. It goes through the organization to the fans and the city. Turner couldn't help but think walking off the court that it could all be just a memory in a couple months.

"It’s a thought for sure," Turner said. "I love playing for the Celtics, I love the city and everything. It’s definitely been a blessing. Hopefully it’s not my last game in a Celtics uniform. The coolest thing is to wear the uniform. I don’t take that for granted. The tradition and opportunity and the energy around it is great."

The feeling seems mutual, but as always in the end, money talks.