Celtics won't have to worry about Bynum (knee) for now

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Celtics won't have to worry about Bynum (knee) for now

PHILADELPHIA -- Nightmare, deferred.

Boston Celtics head coach Doc Rivers will have to wait at least another week -- if at all in the preseason -- to see one of his worst fears, Andrew Bynum, on the floor.

"When you add a Bynum to your team," Rivers said, "you're a better basketball team."

Bynum, acquired by Philadelphia in a four-team trade this summer from the Los Angeles Lakers, has been out the entire preseason and soon will undergo an injection into his surgically repaired right knee.

According to Dei Lyman of CSN Philadelphia, Bynum is in the second of a three-week break from basketball activity.

It is too soon to tell if he will play in any preseason games, which includes a matchup with the C's in Boston on Oct. 21.

A source also told CSN Philadelphia that the injection, which was already in the works, acts as a "motor oil" to help lubricate the knee joints.

Last month, Bynum went to Germany and underwent Orthokine therapy, the same procedure Bynum's former teammate Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant underwent in the fall of 2011.

Former Celtic Jermaine O'Neal had the same procedure performed this past summer, which was instrumental in his decision to return to the NBA (he signed with the Phoenix Suns) for another season instead of retiring.

Philadelphia has kept Bynum from most basketball-related activities with the hope that it will speed up his recovery time so he is available for the start of the season.

While Bynum's long history of knee problems is a concern, his latest injection isn't that big a deal according to his agent, David Lee.

"Just look at it as lubrication for his knees," Lee told the Philadelphia Daily News.

Bynum will be injected with Synvisc-One, a drug used to treat knee osteoarthritis.

Lee added, "He's had them in previous years. Look at it as WD-40, for lack of a better way of explaining it. He gets them at the start of the season, and he gets them at the all-star break. It's noninvasive and has nothing to do with the treatment he received in Germany."

After a series of injuries limited him throughout most of his first six NBA seasons, he played in all but six games a year ago while establishing career highs in scoring (18.7), rebounds (11.8) and minutes played (35.2).

First Celtics practice 'a little different' but 'feels right' for Horford

First Celtics practice 'a little different' but 'feels right' for Horford

WALTHAM, Mass. – NBA players are creatures of habit so you can understand why Al Horford was just a little bit out of his element on his first practice with the Boston Celtics.
 
After nine seasons with the Atlanta Hawks, Horford hit the free agent market this summer and signed a four-year, $113 million with the Celtics.
 
Horford acknowledged that his first practice with the Celtics “was a little different” but added, “It’s definitely a weird feeling, but it feels right to be here.”

Players, coaches, national pundits, the list is seemingly endless when it comes to folks who believe Horford is an ideal fit with the Boston Celtics.
 
“He can do score in the paint, shoot 3s, defend, pass, he can do it all out there,” Amir Johnson told CSNNE.com. “He’s going to fit in well with us.”
 
But like any rookie or newcomer to a team, Horford admitted he had some moments when he was a step or two late getting to where he needed to be on the floor.
 
“We’re running through a lot of plays, a lot of concepts being thrown out,” Horford said. “It’s a matter of getting comfortable with all the sets.”
 
As much as he will work to figure things out, Horford is wise enough to know he’ll need the help of his new teammates, too.
 
“I’m going to lean on a lot of the guys,” Horford said. “I’ll definitely ask a lot of questions. Avery (Bradley) already has gotten in my ear, anything I need he’s there for me. I just want to get acclimated as fast as I can.”
 
Horford also said that head coach Brad Stevens has been extremely helpful in assisting him in speeding up his learning curve.
 
“Coach (Stevens) is very sharp, very . . .  he explains things well,” Horford said. “He explains things well. He wants practice to move along. The pace of practice, definitely a faster pace.”
 
But you won’t find Horford complaining.
 
Horford is clearly excited about starting this new chapter in his basketball career.
 
“For me it’s more of a relief, finally being here in Boston, house, being settled,” Horford said. “Now we can just focus on the season.”