Celtics won't have to worry about Bynum (knee) for now

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Celtics won't have to worry about Bynum (knee) for now

PHILADELPHIA -- Nightmare, deferred.

Boston Celtics head coach Doc Rivers will have to wait at least another week -- if at all in the preseason -- to see one of his worst fears, Andrew Bynum, on the floor.

"When you add a Bynum to your team," Rivers said, "you're a better basketball team."

Bynum, acquired by Philadelphia in a four-team trade this summer from the Los Angeles Lakers, has been out the entire preseason and soon will undergo an injection into his surgically repaired right knee.

According to Dei Lyman of CSN Philadelphia, Bynum is in the second of a three-week break from basketball activity.

It is too soon to tell if he will play in any preseason games, which includes a matchup with the C's in Boston on Oct. 21.

A source also told CSN Philadelphia that the injection, which was already in the works, acts as a "motor oil" to help lubricate the knee joints.

Last month, Bynum went to Germany and underwent Orthokine therapy, the same procedure Bynum's former teammate Los Angeles Lakers star Kobe Bryant underwent in the fall of 2011.

Former Celtic Jermaine O'Neal had the same procedure performed this past summer, which was instrumental in his decision to return to the NBA (he signed with the Phoenix Suns) for another season instead of retiring.

Philadelphia has kept Bynum from most basketball-related activities with the hope that it will speed up his recovery time so he is available for the start of the season.

While Bynum's long history of knee problems is a concern, his latest injection isn't that big a deal according to his agent, David Lee.

"Just look at it as lubrication for his knees," Lee told the Philadelphia Daily News.

Bynum will be injected with Synvisc-One, a drug used to treat knee osteoarthritis.

Lee added, "He's had them in previous years. Look at it as WD-40, for lack of a better way of explaining it. He gets them at the start of the season, and he gets them at the all-star break. It's noninvasive and has nothing to do with the treatment he received in Germany."

After a series of injuries limited him throughout most of his first six NBA seasons, he played in all but six games a year ago while establishing career highs in scoring (18.7), rebounds (11.8) and minutes played (35.2).

Ainge: Groin injury will 'probably' keep Thomas from playing Friday

Ainge: Groin injury will 'probably' keep Thomas from playing Friday

There’s still no concrete answer on how long Isaiah Thomas’ right groin injury will keep him sidelined, but the 5-foot-9 guard probably will not play against Toronto on Friday.
 
Danny Ainge, Boston’s president of basketball operations, addressed Thomas’ availability on 98.5 the Sports Hub's Toucher & Rich show Thursday morning.
 
“It’s day to day,” said Ainge, who added that Thomas had an injection into his thigh muscle. “He is a warrior; he loves to play. He’ll be back faster than most players would be back after an injury. At the same time, we have to be really careful with Isaiah over the long haul and make sure he doesn’t come back and injure it.”
 
Thomas did not play in Boston’s 117-87 win at Orlando on Wednesday night, his first missed game since the 2014-15 season.
 
He is ranked among the NBA’s top-10 scorers with a career-high 26.0 points-per-game average, in addition to leading the Celtics in assists (6.2) per game.
 
Thomas has been effective while playing through an assortment of injuries during his time with Boston. But a groin injury isn't something that can just be played through,  which is why the Celtics are wisely shutting him down now.
 
“We’ll try and get him as much rest as we can and get him back on the court when he’s ready,” Ainge said.