Celtics not interested in Wallace

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Celtics not interested in Wallace

BOSTON Kind of like his time with the Boston Celtics, the talk of a possible Rasheed Wallace return seems to be coming to an end quicker than expected.

A league source told CSNNE.com Friday morning that the Boston Celtics have no interest in bringing the 37-year-old veteran back to the team.

Wallace retired following the 2010 season which ended with the C's losing to the Los Angeles Lakers in the NBA Finals. Boston reached a buyout with him on the remaining years of his contract, which made him an unrestricted free agent.

The C's would have a number of concerns about adding him now, with none bigger than his conditioning.

"It was bad when he played. How is it going to be now?" the source said.

Danny Ainge, Boston's president of basketball operations, declined to comment on Wallace's potential return to the NBA.

Ainge did tell CSNNE.com that he will continue to keep an eye out for potential additions to the roster, but isn't in a hurry to make any significant changes.

"If there's one player that's going to come in and make a difference, that we can get for a minimum contract, we'll look into that, for sure," Ainge said.

The C's can't make trades with players signed or drafted until March 1. Instead, Ainge is more concerned with the team's growth from within.

Specifically, he wants to see more consistent play out of the team's core group which consists of Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Ray Allen and Rajon Rondo.

"Our team's success is going to be determined by the play of our four all-stars," Ainge said. "I always believe that. KG and Paul need to play at a certain level. Rajon and Ray have been playing at a high level. That's going to be the determining factor."

Ainge added, "I'm seriously not panicked. I want to see our team play as well as we're capable of playing, and we haven't. I'm not going to focus as much on the record, as what I see on the court. I have a lot of faith in Paul, Ray and KG. And obviously Rondo, who has consistently been our best player.

"I've just seen the pride; I've seen the way they go about their business. Paul had zero training camp, and is basically working his way back into shape in games, trying to do what he can to help our team. As he gets healthier and we get closer to being at full strength, I like our team and our chances at success."

First impressions: Pomeranz is better, but Red Sox fall to Tigers

First impressions: Pomeranz is better, but Red Sox fall to Tigers

First impressions from the Red Sox' 4-2 loss to the Detroit Tigers:

 

1) The same problem remains for Joe Kelly

As a starter, no one doubted Kelly's fastball, and the velocity with which he threw it. But the problem was, Kelly's fastball was often quite straight, and most major league hitters can hit a fastball without movement, no matter how hard it's thrown.

In his first appearance as a reliever for the Red Sox, the same problem reared its head.

Kelly started off Justin Upton with a 99 mph fastball. After an 89 mph slider, Kelly next threw a 101 mph fastball.

But Upton drove it on a line to the triangle for a triple, and two batters later, trotted home on a soft flare to center by James McCann.

Velocity is one thing and can produce some swings-and-misses. But ultimately, Kelly is going to need more than straight gas to get hitters out.

 

2) Drew Pomeranz was miles better in his second start

Pomeranz failed to get an out in the fourth inning of his Red Sox debut and was charged with five runs.

So when Pomeranz -- who allowed just one hit through the first three innings Monday night -- allowed a leadoff single to Miguel Cabrera to start the fourth, there was uneasy sense of deja vu at Fenway.

But Pomeranz quickly erased Cabrera on a double play and through five innings had allowed just three hits and a walk.

He got into some trouble in the sixth when he allowed a one-out, two-run homer to Jose Iglesias, erasing what had been a 1-0 Red Sox lead.

But Pomeranz was far sharper than his first outing, threw his curveball for more strikes and kept the Tigers mostly off-balance. His line (6 IP; 4 H; 2 ER; 2 BB; 7 K) will be more than good enough on most nights.

Just not Monday night.

 

3) They may lead MLB in runs scored, but there are still nights when the Red Sox offense can frustrate

It happened last Friday when they loaded the bases with no out against the Twins - and failed to score in a 2-1 loss.

It was more of the same Monday night when the Sox loaded the bases in the ninth -- and managed just one run.

The problems weren't limited to the ninth, of course. The Sox put the leadoff man on in both the seventh and eighth innings -- and didn't score.

For the game, the Sox left 11 men on and were just 2-for-10 with runners in scoring position.