Celtics, Lakers completely different from 2010 NBA Finals


Celtics, Lakers completely different from 2010 NBA Finals

It was only three seasons ago that the Boston Celtics and Los Angeles Lakers faced off in a heated Game 7 NBA Finals battle, another chapter in their storied rivalry.

The Lakers captured the trophy in their building, and both teams looked poised to contend again as they left the Staples Center that night.

On Thursday, two very different Celtics and Lakers team will take the court at TD Garden. After years of fighting for homecourt advantage, both clubs are fighting for the playoffs.

The Celtics (25-23) are ranked eighth in the East while the Lakers (23-26) are tenth in the West. Both teams are currently on winning streaks, but both have also struggled with consistency, establishing chemistry with new pieces, and being hit with injuries.

The most glaring difference is not only how the players are performing on the court, but who is on the court. Take a look at how the current Celtics and Lakers teams differ from the squads that fought for it all in Game 7 of the 2010 NBA Finals.

THEN: June 17, 2010

Starters: Rajon Rondo, Ray Allen, Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Rasheed Wallace

Bench: Glen Davis, Tony Allen, Nate Robinson, Brian Scalabrine

DNP: (coachs decision): Marquis Daniels, Michael Finley, Shelden Williams

Starters: Derek Fisher, Kobe Bryant, Metta World Peace, Pau Gasol, Andrew Bynum

Bench: Lamar Odom, Jordan Farmar, Sasha Vujacic, Shannon Brown, Josh Powell

DNP: (coachs decision): D.J. Mbenga, Luke Walton

Now: February 7, 2013


Still on the Celtics: Garnett, Pierce, Rondo

Still in the NBA: R. Allen (Miami Heat), T. Allen (Memphis Grizzlies), Daniels (Milwaukee Bucks), Davis (Orlando Magic), Robinson (Chicago Bulls), Wallace (New York Knicks)

Out of the NBA: Finley, Scalabrine, Williams


Still on the Lakers: Bryant, Gasol, World Peace

Still in the NBA: Brown (Phoenix Suns), Andrew Bynum (Philadelphia 76ers), Lamar Odom (Los Angeles Clippers), Luke Walton (Cleveland Cavaliers)

Out of the NBA: Farmar, Fisher, Mbenga, Powell, Vujacic

Of the six remaining Celtics and Lakers from the 2010 NBA Finals, only four of them will suit up Thursday. Gasol (plantar fascia tear) and Rondo (out for the season, torn ACL) will not.

Six of the current Celtics and Lakers were not in the NBA in 2010. Avery Bradley and Devin Ebanks were drafted just weeks after Game 7, Darius Morris joined the league in 2011, and Fab Melo, Jared Sullinger (out for the season, back) and Robert Sacre were drafted last summer.

At the close of the 2010 NBA season, Garnett had recorded over 22,200 career points. Entering Thursday's game, he is only six shy of 25,000.

Wallace started Game 7 in place of Kendrick Perkins, who injured his knee in Game 6. Perkins currently plays for the Oklahoma City Thunder.

Celtics to begin season with Marcus Smart on the shelf

Celtics to begin season with Marcus Smart on the shelf

WALTHAM, Mass. -- The Boston Celtics will be a bit shorthanded for the first few games of the season with Marcus Smart being out with a left ankle sprain injury.
The Celtics were holding out slim hope that it would heal in time for tomorrow’s game against the Brooklyn Nets.
Smart confirmed a CSNNE.com report shortly after the injury on October 19 that it would likely be at least a couple weeks before he returned to action.
Following Tuesday’s practice, one in which Smart watched from the sidelines, he gave an update on his ankle injury which occurred in the Celtics’ last preseason game, a 121-96 loss to the New York Knicks.
“A couple weeks, that’s the projection (of a return) they gave me,” Smart said. “They want to make sure we can limit this from happening again.”
Smart said the two-week timetable began from the time of his injury, which means it’s likely that he will miss the Celtics’ first four games of the season.
That’s a much rosier timetable than the left ankle sprain injury Smart suffered as a rookie which kept him sidelined for several weeks afterwards.
“It shouldn’t be too long,” Smart said. “Better safe than sorry.”
His absence will certainly have an impact on a Celtics defense that ranked among the NBA’s best a year ago, and has only gotten stronger with the addition of Al Horford.
But the Celtics have been a "next man up" team for since Stevens has been the head coach. With Smart out, that’s not going to change.
“That’ll be a great opportunity for someone else to step up in his place,” said Celtics head coach Brad Stevens.
Boston guard Isaiah Thomas echoed similar thoughts.
“When somebody’s hurt, the next man has to step up,” Thomas said. “Guys have to take advantage of these opportunities.”
And for Smart, it’ll mean displaying his leadership skills from the sideline.
He’s totally comfortable taking on that role right now.
For his teammates, it might take a little bit of getting used to. Smart has been very loquacious on the Celtics sideline since suffering the injury.
“These last four days, he has been yelling … I told him to shut up a few times,” quipped Isaiah Thomas. “That’s just him, especially when he’s not playing. He’s very vocal.”
Terry Rozier, the likely benefactor in terms of minutes played due to Smart’s injury, agreed.
“He’s been sitting right there in that seat,” said Rozier, adding, “and he hasn’t shut up yet. It’s good; you’re going to need a guy like that who is going to talk to you. It’s like a guy, he says things … it’s like he’s been in the league 10 years. He knows his stuff.”
Smart’s knowledge bank includes understanding that his current injury will probably happen again at some point. The key isn’t dealing with the injury, but how you move forward from it.
“This isn’t my first ankle sprain and I know it won’t be my last,” Smart said. “I just have to let it heal on its own and let your body do what it does.”