Canceled games mean Celtics' savings

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Canceled games mean Celtics' savings

With Friday's all-too-predictable announcement by the NBA that all games through November are canceled, it means players are finally going to feel the financial impact of the lockout.

Players are paid bi-weekly during the season, with the first check coming around Nov. 15, and the last one being in May.

From the outset, players knew that fighting for the best deal possible would come at a cost.

And while no one is going to feel sympathy for multimillionaires missing out on a few paychecks, that doesn't diminish the reality that the players in their desire to get what they believe is the best deal possible, are leaving a lot of money on the table that they're unlikely to ever recoup.

The Celtics are no different in that regard, than any other franchise.

While the C's only have a handful of players under contract for this upcoming season, they're all well paid which means each canceled game comes at a hefty price for them all.

But how much?

At CSNNE.com, we've taken a look at just how big a financial hit the C's under contract -- there are six of them, a tally that does not include Jeff Green, who is a restricted free agent -- will take now that the all games in November have been wiped out.

When it comes to figuring out per-game salary, each game represents 190th of the season which includes eight preseason games and a full 82-game schedule.

For the Celtics, that amounts to a total of 22 lost games lost (eight preseason, 14 regular season).

To put in perspective how big a loss this is, those 22 games missed account for 24.4 percent of their entire season (preseason and regular season games combined).

We all know that the Boston Celtics have had one of the league's highest payrolls ever since Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen were traded to Boston in 2008.

But how much is this lockout REALLY costing them?

While the money they're losing out on is significant, don't expect to see KG, Rondo or Allen at a grocery store near you whipping out coupons anytime soon.

And if you're wondering why the owners have been so willing to see games missed, consider this: with no preseason games or games in November, the C's will save nearly 16 million in salaries, a number that would be substantially higher when you consider they would have a roster with at least seven more players.

Player 2011-2012 salary Salarygame missed The lockout cost so far ...

Kevin Garnett 21.247M 236,078 5.2M
Paul Pierce 15.333M 170,370 3.748M
Rajon Rondo 10.045M 111,616 2.455M
Ray Allen 10M 111,111 2.444M
Jermaine O'Neal 6.226M 69,180 1.521M
Avery Bradley 1.524M 16,938 372,416
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total 64.375 M 715,293 15.7 M

Bradley still hurting, will miss Celtics game vs. Trail Blazers

Bradley still hurting, will miss Celtics game vs. Trail Blazers

WALTHAM, Mass. – The right Achilles’ strain that has kept Avery Bradley out of five of the Celtics’ past six games, will continue to keep the 6-foot-2 guard sidelined.
 
Celtics coach Brad Stevens said Bradley will not play Saturday against the Portland Trail Blazers.
 
Stevens added that no additional tests have been taken and the Achilles’ itself is structurally fine.
 
“He’s got a lot of soreness around it, and that’s one of those things you have to be ultra-careful with,” said Stevens, who later added that Bradley would not practice with the team today. “When he [Bradley] came back, he said he felt a lot better, and then he played and the next day he practiced. We didn’t do anything live but he did a lot of cutting and did not feel near as good. That’s why he didn’t play Wednesday.”
 
The absence of Bradley was clearly felt in a 117-106 loss to the New York Knicks on Wednesday, a game in which Knicks guard Derrick Rose – the man Bradley would have likely spent defending most of the game – scored 30 points.
 
This season, all-NBA first team defender is  the Celtics’ No. 2 scorer at 17 points per game along with averaging a team-best 6.9 rebounds.
 
In addition, Bradley is shooting a career-best 40.9 percent from 3-point range, as well as dishing out 2.4 assists per game, which also represents a career-high for the 26-year-old.


 

Celtics rookie Jaylen Brown still undecided on All-Star dunk contest

Celtics rookie Jaylen Brown still undecided on All-Star dunk contest

WALTHAM, Mass. – To dunk or not to dunk with the best in the NBA?
 
That is the question Celtics rookie forward Jaylen Brown is grappling with these days.
 
The 6-foot-7 Brown confirmed that he has been invited to be part of the league’s Slam Dunk competition at All-Star weekend, but hasn’t made up his mind as to whether he will participate.
 
Brown said he’ll likely make a decision about it sometime this weekend.
 
While he certainly understands that is indeed an honor for any player to be asked to participate in All-Star weekend, Brown said his trepidation about being part of the slam dunk competition has a lot to do with its potential impact on his body and how that may affect his ability to recharge over the weekend and get ready to finish out his rookie season strong.
 
If he decided to enter the contest, he would be facing some really stiff competition from last year’s winner Zach LaVine of the Minnesota Timberwolves and Orlando’s Aaron Gordon, whose battle last season put their slam dunk competition among the best ever.
 
Facing tough competition is not something that concerns Brown.
 
“I’m not worried about anybody or anything,” Brown said. “I think I have a lot to offer. Just like your rookie year, your body and everything … it’s a lot. All those dunks, they look cool but it takes a toll on your body for sure. I want to put myself in the best position to help the team.”
 
While his focus has been on the Celtics, Brown acknowledged he has been getting a few tips on the competition from teammate Gerald Green, who is also a former Slam Dunk champion.
 
“[Gerald] Green has been coaching me up, giving me a lot of good ideas I wouldn’t have thought on my own,” Brown said. “If I do decide to do it, it’ll be some stuff [nobody] has seen before.”