Blakely's Celtics-Heat preview

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Blakely's Celtics-Heat preview

MIAMI With very little frontcourt depth, the Boston Celtics can't afford to have too many of their bigs get into early foul trouble. That's easier said than done, especially when talking about backup center Greg Stiemsma.

Just like he has been racking up the blocked shots lately, he's also picking up a considerable number of personal fouls as well.

He has played 10 or more minutes in six of the Celtics' last seven games. In those six games, he has averaged committing five personal fouls per game.

Rivers isn't overly concerned about his only big man off the bench, being a foul magnet of sorts lately.

But if he's going to use the six that he has, Rivers would like him to use them wisely.

"Some of the fouls he's picking up, the ones that I want him to stay away from is the frustration fouls," Rivers said. "He gets frustrated, like he's getting fouled or not fouling and they call it on him. I think he's right, but he's also a rookie and that's just the way it goes."

Said Stiemsma: "Earlier in my career, it might have been a little different of a story. I might not have been able to handle it as well. It's part of the game. You know, I've yet to see a referee change a call yet. Once its made, gotta deal with it and go from there."

Stiemsma's ability to impact the game will be a factor in tonight's game between Boston and Miami. We'll take a look at some other keys that may come into play as Boston tries to beat Miami for the second time in 10 days.

WHAT TO LOOK FOR You can bet one of the first things the Heat will try and do is get LeBron James to get his teammates involved. Of all the problems Boston presented in their 91-72 win over Miami on April 1, it was James' inability to establish scorers around him that put the Boston beat-down in motion. So it's important that Paul Pierce do a good job of not allowing James to find teammates for open or slightly contested shots. But James said he's not coming into tonight's game looking to establish any one particular style of play. "I just kind of let it flow," James said. "Throughout the course of the game, just see if guys have it going, or if I have it going, then I just play it by ear."

MATCHUP TO WATCH - Avery Bradley vs. Dwyane Wade: You could tell this game really means a lot to Wade, who took Sunday night off against Detroit to rest (wink, wink) a sore ankle. As for Bradley, he has to be prepared for a lot of hard screens set to free up Wade. But to his credit, Bradley's ability to move without the ball and get into position to score off cuts will make Wade work hard on defense which if you're the Celtics, you hope will take away some of his offensive fire power. Needless to say, Wade has been impressed with Bradley's emergence. "One thing about Boston, they have a lot of triggers going on," Wade said. "As a defender, you're looking at (Rajon) Rondo with the ball, you're looking at all the triggers the have and he's one of the best cutters. He finds a way to cut, when the triggers are going on. So you're doing what you're taught to do - pay attention to the ball - and he's going the other way. So you just try and be aware of it."

PLAYER TO WATCH: Rajon Rondo has had 17 straight games with 10 or more assist, and the last time he saw Miami on April 1 he had a triple-double. Look for the Heat to try and get the ball as much out Rondo's hands as possible, which would force Paul Pierce into being more of a facilitator as opposed to the C's primary scorer.

STAT TO TRACK: One of the biggest problems Miami has had following the all-star break, has been poor rebounding. Prior to the break, the Heat ranked 10th in bench rebounding, with 43 per game. Since returning from the break, they rank 26th with 39.6 per game. If the Celtics can keep this trend going, it'll provide a huge boost to their chances of beating Miami for the second time in the span of 10 days.

Patriots release veteran wide receiver Nate Washington

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Patriots release veteran wide receiver Nate Washington

FOXBORO -- The Patriots cut down on their numbers at the receiver position on Wednesday by releasing veteran Nate Washington, Tom E. Curran has reported.

Washington, who will turn 33 later this month, was signed in the offseason to a one-year deal with $60,000 guaranteed. His presence on the roster provided the Patriots with some veteran depth as an outside receiver, but when he vomitted at the end of the team's first training camp practice and then missed several practices thereafter, he had difficulty making up for lost time. 

Washington did whatever he could in order to stay involved. Oftentimes he walked in and out of the huddle with teammates even though he would not be involved in the play, and during one practice he ran routes alone on an adjacent field while the Patriots offense went through plays nearby.

The former Steelers, Titans and Texans receiver was eager to prove he had more to give at this late stage of his career. Last season in Houston, in an offense similar to the one in New England, he caught 47 passes for 658 yards and four touchdowns. Prior to last season, during which he played 14 games, Washington had not missed a regular-season game since before the start of the 2006 season. 

With Washington no longer a factor in the wide-receiver picture in New England, the Patriots have one less competitor for what appears as though it will be just one or two open roster spots at the position. 

At the top of the depth chart Julian Edelman, Danny Amendola, Chris Hogan and Malcolm Mitchell are essentially locks to be included on the final 53-man roster. (Amendola is on the physically unable to perform list at the moment but is progressing toward a return.) Matthew Slater can also be included on that list, though his contributions will come primarily as a special teamer.

That means Keshawn Martin, Aaron Dobson, Chris Harper, DeAndre Carter and Devin Lucien could be competing for just one roster spot.

Washington's release gives that situation a little more clarity, but the overall picture is still a hazy one that may sort itself out over the course of the next two weeks. 

Bryan Stork, starting center in 2014 Super Bowl, released by Patriots

Bryan Stork, starting center in 2014 Super Bowl, released by Patriots

The first mildly-surprising release of training camp is in the books as the Patriots have parted ways with third-year center Bryan Stork, Tom E. Curran has confirmed. 

Ian Rapoport of NFL Media was the first to report the news. 

Stork was involved in one of the most hotly-contested battles of camp, vying for the starting center role along with 2015 undrafted free agent David Andrews. The pair split reps through the spring and into the summer, but Stork suffered what was reported as a concussion, missed a week of practice, and lost ground to Andrews that was never made up. Andrews started each of the team's first two preseason games, and he was consistently the first center on the practice field even after Stork's return. 

Andrews started and played every snap for the Patriots through the first nine games of last season, helping the team go 9-0 in that stretch. When Stork was activated off of the short-term injured reserve list, he re-gained the center job and Andrews a reserve role. 

Stork made an almost immediate impact with the Patriots after he was drafted out of Florida State in the fourth round in 2014. He made his first start in Week 4 and started 11 games in total. He also started in the Divisional Round against the Ravens that season and in Super Bowl XLIX. 

Stork's release was likely a result of a handful of factors, including Andrews' rise, his own injury history, and perhaps a certain level of on-the-field unpredictability he displayed at times. Stork was removed from two Patriots practices this preseason -- one during OTAs and one during training camp -- for fighting. He also drew an unnecessary roughness penalty during last season's AFC title game. 

The Patriots will move forward under unretired offensive line coach Dante Scarnecchia with Andrews, Josh Kline and sixth-round rookie Ted Karras as the players who have taken center snaps in training camp practices. 

Brady: Preseason reps help you adapt to the speed of the game

Brady: Preseason reps help you adapt to the speed of the game

FOXBORO -- It's clear that Tom Brady wants to play at some point this preseason. What's a little less clear is what he thinks he stands to gain from preseason game reps in August when he won't be playing meaningful snaps until October. 

After explaining why he missed Thursday's preseason game with the Bears, which he was scheduled to start, Brady was asked on Tuesday if he feels as though he needs game reps before matching up with the Browns in Week 5.

"I don’t think any of them hurt," he said. "I think just do the best you can do. We’re preparing a lot of guys to get ready to play. I fit into that, but so do a lot of other guys. I’m just taking the advice of coach [Bill Belichick], and whatever he wants to do. I’m going to do everything I can to be ready to go when I am called upon. That’s what my responsibility is so that’s what I’m preparing to do."

If the only benefit of having Brady play against the Panthers in the third preseason game amounts to, "Well, couldn't hurt..." then it would come as some surprise if Belichick opted to play Brady anyway. Because it could hurt. It could hurt quite a bit should something flukey happen and Brady ends up worse off than he was after his recent run-in with a pair of scissors. 

Former assistant to the Patriots coaching staff Mike Lombardi, told WEEI recently that Brady needs to work in a preseason game before serving his four-game suspension. Why? 

"The speed of the game changes," Lombardi said. "You have practices against the Bears, but it’s kind of simulated and controlled. I think Tom wants to get the flow of the game . . . Because it’s the third preseason game, Jimmy [Garoppolo] is probably going to play as much into the third quarter as possible, and then you don’t want to put Tom out there with a lot of other guys that perhaps won’t make the team. The second game was kind of a game where he should have played a little bit to get his feet wet. He’s not going to play the fourth game against the New York Giants. That’s going to be Jacoby Brissett’s game. 

"I think [the Bears game] was the time, and that’s why [Brady] was going to play. Obviously something happened with the injury and that’s why he didn’t play . . . I know Tom needs to play in the preseason. He’s not just going to go waltz onto the field and feel the game is going to come right to him."

It feels as though Brady, after 16 years in the NFL, would be able to adapt to the speed of the game relatively quickly with or without preseason reps. But Brady expressed an opinion similar to that of Lombardi when asked about the difference between preseason snaps and practice snaps. He's seen plenty of the latter against the Bears, Saints and his own teammates.

"Well, I think you’re getting hit so just the space awareness, guys around you and ball security and things like that," Brady said. "For whatever, the last 30 practices, quarterbacks aren’t touched. Just standing there in the pocket, holding the ball knowing that they’re coming to get the ball and knock it out of your hands, hitting the ground, those types of things and so forth are important.

"You just have to feel things out, and the game is really the only place to get it because it’s regular speed. You don’t know what’s coming. We prepare, but we don’t obviously get to walk through the looks that we’re going to get. When you get out there you just have to make good decisions and go play quarterback the way that I’ve always tried to do."

Maybe it's to adapt to the pace of the game. Maybe it's to be faced with the real threat of contact. Maybe it's just because he can't stand not to be on the field when the Patriots are playing. Either way, Brady obviously hopes that he'll play on Friday night in Carolina. 

The question now is are the benefits great enough that Belichick will allow him to?