Allen emphasizes conditioning early

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Allen emphasizes conditioning early

WALTHAM -- Ray Allen is used to being the first one at the arenas on game days, and that mentality did not waiver this extended offseason.

Allen has become accustomed to starting training camp in late September, so when that time rolled around and the NBA was still in the middle of its lockout, he found his own way to prepare for the season.

I was getting up every morning going to the gym and begging people to let me in the gym and shoot, he said after practice on Sunday. I was shooting in different gyms in my neighborhood, going to the health club in my neighborhood every day.

In spite of all the hours Allen clocked in the gym, shots he put up, and miles he ran, it doesnt compare to the strain placed on his body when he is playing the game. Hes feeling it early on in training camp, but he doesnt mind it in the beginning stages.

I could run all day long on the treadmill or run outside or do different things, but basketball is such a different dynamic for anybodys body being in that position and then having other guys leaning on you throughout the whole time and getting to your spot and being able to shoot and score, he said. You could do it but you do feel fatigue. It wears on you over time, so I like to put myself in that situation to try to let those muscles feel it and get that fatigue and then kind of fight through it, and thats how I get over it.

Allen, 36, has been through enough training camps to understand the benefit of conditioning early on in the season. He wants his entire team to make it a priority in these first weeks.

"The last couple of weeks has been a disadvantage to the players and we put ourselves in this situation, so all we have to do now is handle the situation, making sure guys that are here are on the floor, putting themselves in the best position to get in the best shape they can possibly get in, he said. One of the things Ive known most of my career is that early in the season, you tend to miss shots, you get tired, mentally you make mistakes in the fourth quarter, so whatever we can do to improve our conditioning early. Its important for all of us.

One factor that Allen believes will benefit the Celtics during this condensed season head coach Doc Rivers, who saw the effects of the previous NBA lockout. With so many veteran players on the team, Allen says Rivers will be able to manage their playing time to keep them ready for the postseason.

I think more important is just having a coach thats been around and understands it because you know how not to push your guys and you know what to expect, he said. You remember how guys bodies felt the last time, and we talked to guys about that. I think we have one stretch in April, March we have so many games, we kind of know what its going to be like in advance. So whatever you can do now to build up that equity early so you know going into that, you know your bodies good and you didnt do anything stupid schedule-wise with games.

While Allen is happy to be back on the court getting ready for the season, there are a few people who could miss him being around the local gyms for those early morning workouts.

I ended up turning into a strength coach at some point. Im working some of my wifes friends out, he said. I got to the point where they probably looked around the corner and said, Is Ray here? OK good, I can work out.

Bradley locked in during return to Celtics lineup vs. Hornets

Bradley locked in during return to Celtics lineup vs. Hornets

BOSTON – When you look at Avery Bradley’s growth this season, seeing the tremendous strides he has made offensively is clear.

But at the heart of Bradley’s game remains a desire to dominate a matchup as a defender, something that was alive and well on Monday as he made his return to the floor after missing the four previous games with an Achilles strain.

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Bradley’s defense would prove instrumental in Boston’s 108-98 win over the Charlotte Hornets on Monday.

He was 2-for-9 from the field and played nearly 33 minutes against Hornets which is just a couple minutes under his season average of court time.

Usually he’s responsible for providing a boost at both ends of the floor.

But considering his long lay-off, it was clear early on that he was locked in defensively more so than looking to get back on track shooting the ball.

“You take any type of games off in this league, your rhythm and all that you gotta get it back,” said Boston’s Jae Crowder.

Even though his shots weren’t falling, Bradley was on top of his game defensively while guarding 6-foot-8 Nicolas Batum who is six inches taller but never was a factor on Monday.

Batum finished with eight points on 2-for-11 shooting from the field.

Celtics head coach Brad Stevens liked what he got out of Bradley in his return to action.

“I thought he (Bradley) was great,” Stevens told CSNNE.com. “He did everything we needed him to do. We knew there would be a little bit of rust (shooting the ball), but that’s part of you playing your way back into it.”

As far as Bradley’s stifling defense on Batum, Stevens said, “You have to do that against Batum. I thought Avery did a really good job of that. It’s a hard matchup no matter what way you go. Batum, giving up inches to him. He (Bradley) was there on the catch all night.”

And as Bradley gradually gets back into a flow, he’ll regain the form offensively that made him one of the NBA’s better two-way players this season.