Allen: 'Definitely won't rule myself out for Monday'

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Allen: 'Definitely won't rule myself out for Monday'

WASHINGTON A left ankle injury suffered in the second quarter of Boston's 100-94 win over Washington was able to do what the Wizards defense couldn't - slow Ray Allen down.

Allen, who has had multiple ankle injuries throughout his career, was unable to play in the second half and isn't sure if he'll suit up for Monday's game against Orlando.

"I definitely won't rule myself out," Allen said. "Tomorrow's a new day. I always like to think I'm in the lineup, no matter what. I work my body it has done great things, miraculous things for me over the past. That's why I take care of it. Tomorrow, sleep, get rest and heal up for tomorrow."

Ankle injuries are not foreign to Allen. Prior to arriving in Boston, Allen had surgery on both ankles during the 2006-2007 season.

Since then, he has had nothing more than an occasional ankle sprain.

"Having surgeries on my ankles in the past, I've been blessed that they've been good," Allen said. "That's why managing, taking care of my body is important."

Without Allen, look for the Celtics to go with Mickael Pietrus who continues to provide a lift at both ends of the floor for Boston off the bench.

On Sunday, Pietrus finished with 14 points on 5-for-8 shooting from the field. He was also 2-for-4 from 3-point range, the kind of performance they needed after a six-point performance in Boston's 79-71 loss to Phoenix on Friday.

In that game, C's coach Doc Rivers thought Pietrus at times wasn't as aggressive as they need him to be.

That wasn't a problem against the Wizards, with Pietrus scoring not only from the perimeter but also looking to take advantage of Washington's "small ball" lineup that matched him up at times with a smaller player.

Rivers said Pietrus' play was among the many positive performances the C's can take from Sunday's win.

"When you have Ray Allen and (Rajon) Rondo off the floor (because of injuries)," Rivers said, "you're searching and I thought our guys did a great job."

Bennett on Goodell: 'Where is he? He's like Waldo right now'

Bennett on Goodell: 'Where is he? He's like Waldo right now'

FOXBORO -- Leave it to Martellus Bennett, the children's book author, to make a cartoon reference when asked about the lingering effects of Deflategate. 

Could hear the "Where's Roger?" chants that rang throughout Gillette Stadium on Sunday night, a reporter wondered? Bennett deflected at first. 

"Who's Roger," he asked? 

PATRIOTS 36, STEELERS 17

Then it was pointed out to him that the chants were directed to NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, who opted to attend the NFC title game in Atlanta -- his second trip to the Georgia Dome in as many weeks -- instead of the AFC title game between the Patriots and Steelers. 

"Oh yeah," Bennett said, his memory apparently jogged. "Where is he? He's like Waldo right now. He didn't want to come here."

Tom Brady was asked about the chants as well. He had to have heard them, a reporter noted. 

"I didn't hear that chant," Brady insisted. "I did hear them singing to Bon Jovi, though, that was pretty cool."

Awaiting the Patriots in Houston will be the Atlanta Falcons, obviously, but one side plot will be the potential for a face-to-face for Goodell and the Patriots.

In the past, Goodell has handed the Lombardi Trophy to the Super Bowl winner following the game -- a tradition one would expect would continue this year regardless of who wins. The commissioner has also awarded the game's MVP award to the honoree on the morning after the game. Following the Super Bowl two seasons ago, Brady and Goodell shared a stage as Brady accepted the MVP hardware.