15 things to know about Terrence Williams

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15 things to know about Terrence Williams

A week after leaving the Guangdong Southern Tigers of China, forward Terrence Williams has signed a 10-day contract with the Boston Celtics. Williams, 25, entered the NBA in 2009 and has been looking to establish himself in the league since then. Get to know Williams with these 15 factoids.

1. The 6-6 wingman is from a close-knit circle of Seattle-area basketball players, which includes current Celtics Avery Bradley and Jason Terry.

2. Williams attended Rainier Beach High School, the same school as former Celtic Nate Robinson, Jamal Crawford, and Doug Christie.

3. A standout at the University of Louisville, Williams averaged 12.5 points, 8.6 rebounds, and 5.0 assists his senior year. He was featured on the cover of the Sports Illustrated 2009 NCAA Tournament preview issue.

4. The Nets selected Williams with the 11th overall pick in the 2009 NBA Draft. His name was called after Brandon Jennings and before Gerald Henderson.

5. On October 28, 2009, Williams posted a 15-point, 10-rebound double-double in his NBA debut. He played 31 minutes off the bench against the Minnesota Timberwolves.

6. Williams' second season with the Nets was rocky. He was inactive for games and was also sent to the NBA Development League's Springfield Armor.

7. Williams was involved in a three-team trade between the New Jersey Nets, Houston Rockets, and Los Angeles Lakers in 2010 that ended up having ties to the Celtics. In December of 2010, the Nets traded Williams to the Rockets. As part of the the same deal, the Lakers sent a 2011 first round draft pick to the Nets. Six months later, the Nets used that pick to select JaJuan Johnson 27th overall in the 2011 NBA Draft, and then traded him to the Boston Celtics along with a future second round pick in exchange for MarShon Brooks.

8. The Celtics will be Williams' fifth NBA team. He has been a member of the Nets, Rockets, Sacramento Kings, and Detroit Pistons (chronologically). Williams has averaged 7.6 points, 3.9 rebounds, and 2.5 assists in 20.2 minutes during his NBA career.

9. This season Williams played 29 games for the Guangdong Southern Tigers of China. He averaged 17.9 points, 3.4 rebounds, and 4.1 assists in 27.0 minutes.

10. Williams competed in 140 games (4,510 minutes played) during his four years at Louisville. Since being drafted in 2009, he has played in 129 games (2,604 minutes) in the NBA.

11. Celtics guard Courtney Lee has already suited up with Williams. Lee and Williams were teammates with both the Nets and the Rockets.

12. While in college, Williams listed LeBron James as his favorite NBA player and the Miami Heat as his favorite NBA team on his Louisville player page. (If he could update that today, he probably would.)

13. Williams is featured in the online series "Poor Hungry Driven" about his life. He tattooed the abbreviation "PHD" on his arm (can you find it?).

14. Remember the phrase "wordaapp" Nate Robinson helped make popular while on the Celtics? Williams played a big part in it.

15. Social media savvy, Williams is on Twitter @TheRealTWill and Facebook.

Celtics' team plane receives bomb threat

Celtics' team plane receives bomb threat

BOSTON -- There was a bomb threat to the Boston Celtics’ team plane to Oklahoma City on Saturday afternoon, but no one was injured.

The incident will be investigated by NBA security which will work in conjunction with the FBI on this matter which was one of several hoaxes called into airports across the country on Saturday.

News of the bomb threat was first known when Celtics forward Jae Crowder posted an Instagram photo showing players departing the plane with the caption, “BOMB THREAT ON US”.

Celtics officials declined to comment on the matter and instead referred all bomb threat-related questions to the league office.

Messages to the league office were not immediately returned.

Celtics' ball movement among NBA's best, with or without Thomas

Celtics' ball movement among NBA's best, with or without Thomas

BOSTON – When it comes to winning basketball, keep it moving – the ball that is – has become a staple of the Celtics this season. 
 
And lately they’ve had to do it without Isaiah Thomas, the team’s leading scorer at 26 points per game as well as their top assists guy (6.2) who will miss hish third game in a row Sunday in Oklahoma City because of a right groin injury.
 
The Celtics have split their first two games without Thomas, with the most recent being a 101-94 home loss to Toronto on Friday.
 
When it comes to this team and ball movement, fans are just as divided when it pertains to whether the Celtics move the ball better without the high-scoring Thomas in the lineup. 
 
Regardless of what fans think they know about this team and how they move the ball, the numbers paint a very clear picture that this team’s ball movement is among the best in the NBA, with or without Thomas in the lineup. 

And that will be important on Sunday against an Oklahoma City team that doesn’t rely on the ball swinging from one side of the floor to the other, nearly as much as the Celtics. 
 
The Thunder, led by MVP candidate Russell Westbrook, are dead-last in the NBA when it comes to passes made per game (267.1). 
 
Meanwhile, the Celtics are at the opposite end of the passing game spectrum, averaging 331.7 passes per game, which is second in the NBA (Philadelphia, 354.3).
 
And in the two games without Thomas, Boston has averaged 347.0 passes per game, which ranks second in the NBA in that period of time. 
 
In addition to missing his points and assists, the Celtics must also find ways to make plays in filling the void left by a player who has the ball in his hands a lot of the time. 
 
Thomas’ usage percentage (percentage of plays used by a player while he’s on the floor) of 32.9 percent ranks seventh in the NBA, ahead of notable stars such as San Antonio’s Kawhi Leonard (30.9 percent), Portland’s Damian Lillard (30.8 percent), New York’s Carmelo Anthony (29.5 percent), as well as Cleveland’s LeBron James (29 percent) and Golden State’s back-to-back NBA MVP Stephen Curry (28.2 percent).
 
So, considering how involved Thomas has been in the team’s offense, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the numbers in terms of passing and ball movement are better without him than they are when he’s on the floor playing. 
 
What should be surprising is that the gap statistically without him, isn’t greater. 
 
Boston has been a top five team when it comes to assists this season, currently third in the league with 24.7 assists per game. In the past two games without Thomas, the Celtics’ assists numbers have risen to 26.5 per game, but that only ranks fifth in the league in that span.
 
When it comes to potential assists and secondary assists (a.k.a. the “hockey” assist), Boston’s numbers have improved slightly without Thomas as well, but in each category Boston is ranked second in the league. 
 
And that ranking is with, and without Thomas in the lineup. 
 
While it’s not clear if Thomas knows just how close the numbers in terms of ball movement are with and without him playing, he is acutely aware that there are some who believe they are a better team in terms of keeping the ball moving without him.
 
“I can’t control that,” Thomas told reporters on Friday. “At this point, I laugh about it. I know what I mean to my teammates. I know what I mean to this organization, to Brad Stevens.”