Wakeup Call: Is Bobby Loo headed to Washington?

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Wakeup Call: Is Bobby Loo headed to Washington?

Here's your wakeup call -- a combination of newsworthy andor interesting tidbits -- for Monday, February 4.

BASEBALL
Spring training's just around the corner and Dice-K is still job-hunting. But, apparently, the Astros and Mets are interested . .. kind of. (NBC's Hardball Talk)

Hanley Ramirez not doing what the team wants. Go figure. (Hardball Talk)

Evan Longoria's "leg is ready," and so is he. (Hardball Talk)

Torii Hunter certainly landed on his feet -- there are worse places to play than with the defending A.L. champions -- but he still sounds a bit chapped about his departure from the Angels. (Hardball Talk)

After 16 years, Kevin Millwood calls it quits. (Hardball Talk)

Not Brandon Lyon, though. (Hardball Talk)

The Orioles come to their senses. (Hardball Talk)

BOXING
Reports of Muhammad Ali's death are greatly exaggerated. (AP via nbcsports.com)

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
As are reports of Louisville's. (AP)

COLLEGE FOOTBALL
If it's the offseason, it must be police log time. First up: A freshman backup quarterback at Texas. (AP)

Next: Texas A&M defensive lineman Kirby Ennis. (AP)

Not in trouble with the cops, but with the school: Purdue wide receiver O.J. Ross. (AP)

GOLF
Lefty goes wire-to-wire at the Phoenix Open. (AP)

Your other weekend winners: Karrie Webb at the Australian Ladies Masters . . . (AP)

. . . and Stephen Gallacher at the Dubai Desert Classic. (AP)

HOCKEY
The Penguins continue their early season surge, and the Capitals their early season stumble, in Pittsburgh's 6-3 win over Washington. (AP)

But don't worry, Caps: Has Mike Gillis got a deal for you! (NBC's Pro Hockey Talk)

The miracles of modern medicine: Eight days after his appendectomy, Max Pacioretty leads the Canadiens to their fifth straight home victory. (AP)

Turns out that emotional win in Boston Thursday night was just a mirage for the Sabres. (AP)

PRO BASKETBALL
Erik Spoelstra gets to coach the East in the All-Star Game since the Heat -- thanks to Sunday's victory in Toronto -- compiled the best record in the conference as of the Feb. 3 deadline. (AP)

The Lakers make it five wins in six games -- barely -- by hanging on to beat Detroit. (AP)

Brandon Roy sure sounds like a guy who's calling it a day after this frustrating, injury-plagued season is over. (NBC's Pro Basketball Talk)

Good news for those who saw Michael Kidd-Gilchrist being carried off the court Saturday night in Houston: He was cleared to fly and traveled to Miami with the rest of the Bobcats. (CSN Houston)

PRO FOOTBALL
When all is said is done, what we'll really remember about Super Bowl XLVII is the lights going out . . . and, apparently, Beyonce's halftime show had something to do with it. (AP)

They sure had a good time with the whole thing on Twitter. (NBC's Off The Bench)

By the time the power failed, the 49ers had pretty much sealed their fate . . . (CSN Bay Area)

. . . though they came back and made a game of it once the lights returned. (CSN Bay Area)

And two of the biggest reasons why? Vernon Davis and Michael Crabtree. (Our very own Tom E. Curran via CSN Bay Area)

Not so much Randy Gene, a.k.a. The Self-Proclaimed Greatest Receiver Of All Time, as the final memory San Franciscans may have of him is an alligator-arm effort that drew some -- okay, a lot of -- scorn from Bill Romanowski. (CSN Bay Area)

Colin Kaepernick, though, blames himself. (CSN Bay Area)

Others, however, blame the referees . . . (CSN Bay Area)

. . . and Jim Harbaugh is one of them . . . (NBC's Pro Football Talk)

. . . though he seems to have forgotten that the 'Niners benefitted from some non-calls on the road to New Orleans. (Pro Football Talk)

Jim Harbaugh's sorrow took away -- a little -- from John Harbaugh's joy. (AP)

Who had the under on how long the postgame handshake would take? (Yahoo! Sports)

Still think he's not elite? (CSN Baltimore)

Hey, did you know this was Ray Lewis' last game? Yeah, I figured you might have missed it; he was kind of downplaying the whole thing. (CSN Baltimore)

Quite the homecoming for Jacoby Jones, wouldn't you say? (AP)

The whole thing was a throwback to the '70s. (Pro Football Talk)

Though some of the commercials -- particularly that one for godaddy.com -- were strictly new-millenium stuff. (the700level.com via CSN Philly)

If you're in Baltimore this week, clear your calendar for Tuesday. (CSN Baltimore)

So what did you expect him to say? (AP)

Now that it's over and the offseason has begun, look for the 49ers to try and trade Alex Smith. (Pro Football Talk)

Wait. Did anybody actually think Bill Parcells doesn't belong in the Hall of Fame? (CSN Philly)

TENNIS
Sam Querrey comes through in the deciding fifth match to lift the U.S. over Brazil and into the Davis Cup quarterfinals. (AP)

Canada's there, too, thanks to an upset of shorthanded Spain. (AP)

Poor Sloane Stephens: A week after being named to the U.S. Fed Cup, she has to pull out because of a strained abdominal muscle. (AP)

Maria Kirilenko wins the Pattaya Open for her first WTA victory since 2008. (AP)

Haggerty: For better or worse, Bruins need to make a call on Julien

Haggerty: For better or worse, Bruins need to make a call on Julien

The Bruins coach and leaders in their dressing room spoke out this weekend, and their words all basically spread the same supportive message.

Claude Julien and his longtime players aren’t ready for a change at the head coaching position for the Black and Gold and they hope the longtime bench boss is in Boston for as long as possible after 10 mostly successful years on the job.

Still, it may not go down that way this season with real pressure on B’s management, coaches and the players to end a two-year playoff drought. Things are currently going pretty badly with the Bruins in the middle of a three-game losing streak before facing the reigning Stanley Cup champion Pittsburgh Penguins on Sunday afternoon.

The heat has been dialed up as high as it’s ever been on Julien in his 10 years of employment with Boston and everybody seems to know it.

“Right now we’re all confident in Claude, and we all want to be here and play for him. If [saving Julien’s job] is the extra motivation you need for the games then so be it,” said Patrice Bergeron. “But we’re all professionals and we’re here to win hockey games. I’ve said this before that I’ve been with Claude for 10 years, and he’s the guy that I believe in and that I want to play for.”

Similarly, the Bruins captain has been with Julien for the long haul in Boston and has worked closely with the coach keeping lines of communication open in good, Cup-winning times and bad, non-playoff times. Chara bestowed Julien with every bit the endorsement that Bergeron did, and it’s clear much of the core group wants to keep the longtime coach in place.

“We don’t pay attention [to the chatter]. Claude is our coach and Claude will be our coach. We have confidence in him,” said Bruins captain Zdeno Chara. “He’s proven to be a coach that does a lot of good things for this organization. We just have to come up with some wins, battle it and we’re all in this together.”

One thing that’s a legitimate question: Is the devotion of players like Chara and Bergeron toward Julien a defining reason to keep the longtime coach?

There isn’t a sense the Bruins have tuned out their coach, as can happen in dysfunctional NHL situations, but there is a feeling that longtime B’s players with status are pretty comfortable with iron-clad no-movement clauses in their contracts and a relationship with the coach where there’s a level they may not be getting pushed toward very often.

Comfort isn’t always a good thing in an NHL dressing room and it’s felt altogether too comfortable at times in some of those no-show performances from the Black and Gold over the past couple of failed seasons. 

For his part, Julien doesn't think that was the case and intends on continuing to work his way through the struggles with a mix of youth and veteran players who clearly have enough to be a playoff team.

“If we’re going with what we said we were going with and there’s going to be some growing pains along the way, so be it,” said Julien. “I think we put ourselves in a position earlier in the year where we could all of a sudden believe that we’re a playoff team...absolutely. I still think we’re a playoff team. Whether we can do it or not we’ll find out at the end of the year, but my job is to do everything I can to get us into the playoffs and that’s what I’m going to do.

“As far as the [firing] rumors are concerned, they’re out there and I know that. But I don’t worry about it because worrying is wasting a lot of my time. And my time is spent trying to fix things here.”

It would be ridiculous and pointless to compare this season’s Bruins roster to the groups that won Cups, made it to the Finals twice and even won a President’s Trophy in 2013-14. Clearly, this particular roster isn’t as deep, or as difficult to play against, as those talent-stuffed hockey clubs, but this team also has enough high-end talent that they should edge teams like Toronto, Ottawa and Philadelphia out of a playoff spot.

This is where the theoretical move to fire Julien comes into play.

The Bruins are at a critical stage of their season where things are slipping away from them and the team is showing some of the maddening characteristics of the past two seasons.

They are unprepared to play on too many nights. They take opponents lightly on too many nights particularly in the past couple of months. A tiring Tuukka Rask isn’t able to bail the team out as much as he was in the first couple of months. Because the Bruins are being strangled by a roster of immovable players with no-trade clauses and can’t even entertain trading their blue-chip prospects Brandon Carlo and Charlie McAvoy, the trade options just aren’t there for Don Sweeney and Cam Neely right now.

It would take a brilliant, creative GM to swing a hockey deal that could pump life back into the reeling Bruins. The B’s front office hasn’t shown those qualities in the past few years running the team. Instead, they have GMs from other teams lining up and making one-sided offers to the desperate Bruins in hopes that Sweeney/Neely will buckle under the pressure to push into the playoffs this spring.

So, the only impactful card the Bruins can play is firing a coach in Julien who probably isn’t the coach of the future when the next generation of B’s prospects is ready to go. The hope is that move can light a fire under their meandering hockey club if it doesn't start reeling off some wins in a row. An argument can be made that a coach such as current assistant Bruce Cassidy could get more out of some of Boston’s younger players they’re relying heavily on this season. The former Providence Bruins coach might fit a little better into the overall philosophy that management is looking to instill.

It might just be that making a coaching change is the best midseason card that Bruins management has to play given all of the circumstances.

Still, the one thing that B’s management can’t do is keep Julien twisting in the wind and answering all the questions about his future with no clear vote of confidence from his bosses. Julien is the winningest coach in Bruins history and led them to their glorious Stanley Cup run in 2011. He’s earned a wealth of respect around the league for the professional, classy way he’s always conducted himself on and off the ice and he won’t be out of work long if/when he is relieved of his duties on Causeway Street.

So, if the Bruins intend to make the move with their coach then they need to do it sooner rather than later.

People around the NHL are watching the Bruins intently to see how they handle this situation with a world-class coach in Julien, and Neely and Sweeney continue to be radio/TV silent, despite the Bruins media requesting to speak with them on Friday morning in the throes of their losing streak.

It’s high time for Bruins management to step up and make a decision on Julien for better or for worse, and treat him the way they’d undoubtedly like to be treated if it were them suddenly in the danger zone should they miss the playoffs again this spring.  

Sunday, Jan. 22: Jimmy Vesey's rookie wall

Sunday, Jan. 22: Jimmy Vesey's rookie wall

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading, while proud of my wife and daughter for taking part in the Women’s March on Saturday.

*The day-to-day NHL grind may be getting to Jimmy Vesey a bit, and causing him to hit a bit of a rookie wall after his Harvard career.

*Alex Radulov has gone from being an NHL headache to being an impact playmaker for the Canadiens in a quick pivot for the Russian player.

*Melrose native Conor Sheary seems to have found a home for himself on the Pittsburgh Penguins skating on a line with a guy named Sidney Crosby.

*The Chicago Blackhawks are always looking to improve, and they’ve reportedly kicked the tires on Gustav Nyquist and Tomas Tatar with Detroit.

*St. Louis Blues coach Ken Hitchcock is nearing another coaching milestone in what’s been a long, distinguished career behind the bench.

*P.K. Subban is slowly approaching a return to the Nashville Predators lineup from injury, and the Preds need him as soon as possible.

*For something completely different: Greg Poppovich hits the nail on the head here, and it never ceases to amaze me that he’s such a smart, well-versed human being.