Savard returns Thursday to host donated luxury suite

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Savard returns Thursday to host donated luxury suite

Its been eerily quiet on the Marc Savard front for too long this season as he continues to battle post-concussion syndrome symptoms, but Bruins Nation will finally hear from No. 91 Thursday night . . . and for all the right reasons.

Savard will be in Boston to attend the BruinsCanadiens game and hell begin hosting a luxury suite at the TD Garden for pediatric patients at Childrens Hospital Boston, with a focus on children suffering from the effects of head trauma from both a medical and psychological standpoint.

Savard purchased the suite for every Bruins home game for the remainder of the 2011-12 season and through the completion of the 2013-14 season. The suite will be complete with healthy food and goodie bags for each guest, as well as a visit from the Bruins mascot, Blades, and the Bruins Ice Girls.

Savard will entertain his young guests in the box on Thursday night at the Garden in his first appearance in Boston this season.
The head trauma issues obviously hits very close to home for Savard, who has played in a grand total of 32 NHL games regular season and playoffs since being blindsided by a Matt Cooke elbow on March 7, 2009 in Pittsburgh that ultimately brought about the NHLs newly adopted head shot rules.

The team agreed to shut down Savard this season, and both general manager Peter Chiarelli and coach Claude Julien have indicated that the playmaking centers career may very well be over.

"Marc Savard understands firsthand the challenges faced by children suffering from the effects of head trauma from both a medical and psychological standpoint," Beth Donegan Driscoll, Director of Child Life Services at Childrens Hospital Boston, said in a statement released by the Bruins. "The partnership with Marc Savard is an exceptional opportunity for Childrens Hospital Boston patients and their families to experience the thrill of a Bruins game at the generosity of this very special man."
The Childrens Hospital Boston Brain Injury Center specializes in the management and treatment of all types of traumatic brain injury. The Childrens Hospital Boston Brain Injury Center is helping to define the best practices in the way brain injuries are cared for, from early response through inpatient care and long-term follow-up.

First impressions: Yankees power their way past Price, Red Sox

First impressions: Yankees power their way past Price, Red Sox

NEW YORK -- First impressions from the Red Sox' 6-4 loss to the Yankees.

 

* As the postseason gets closer, David Price needs to do a better job of keeping the ball in the ballpark.

Price gave up three homers Tuesday night -- a two-run shoot to rookie sensation Gary Sanchez in the first; a solo shot to Didi Gregorius in the sixth; and another two-run belt in the seventh to Tyler Austin.

That's six homers in the last three outings and 29 for the season. It's also the sixth time this season that he's given up multiple homers in the same start, with the three on Tuesday representing a season-high.

Prior to this year, Price had never allowed more than 25 homers in a season. Last season, splitting time between the cavernous Comerica Park in Detroit and the hitter-friendly Rogers Centre, he yielded just 17.

Worse, twice Tuesday the homers came at inauspicious times. In the sixth, the Sox had just closed to within one at 3-2; in the seventh, the Sox had worked t tie the game at 4-4.

 

* For all of the offensive brilliance shown by Mookie Betts, it's easy to forget how good he's been in right field.

Anyone who plays in the same outfield with Jackie Bradley Jr. runs the risk of having his defensive play overshadowed and that's likely the case with Betts.

He's played a Gold Glove-caliber right field, showing good range and instincts -- especially for someone who never played the outfield professionally until about 2 1/2 years ago.

And while Bradley has the stronger arm, Betts has 14 assists, including one Tuesday night.

That took place on a ball in which Betts was initially fooled. With one on, Chase Headley lined a ball to right that Betts seemed to lose in the lights. He went to his knees, fighting the lights, and managed to reach back to make the catch, sprawling. He then had the presence of mind to set himself and fire a throw to first, doubling up Starlin Castro for a mind-blowing double play.

 

* Expanded rosters make a mockery of the game.

In the eighth inning, Joe Girardi and John Farrell combined to burn through six players for one plate appearance.

Righty Blake Parker was set to face Aaron Hill, but Farrell had lefty Travis Shaw announced. Girardi then countered by bringing in lefty Richard Bleier to face Shaw.

Of course, Farrell countered by having righty Chris Young hit for Shaw. Young reached on a fielder's choice, and because Young can't play third, Farrell had insert Deven Marrero at third in the bottom of the inning.

Four position players and two pitchers in one spot. That couldn't be done in any other month during the season.

So why is it allowed in September?