Report: Brown "not available" at deadline


Report: Brown "not available" at deadline

BUFFALO Those dreaming of Dustin Brown filling in along the Bruins depleted right wing should hope to never wake up.

CBC rink side reporter Elliotte Friedman doused cold water all over TSN reports that Los Angeles Kings winger and Captain Dustin Brown was available on the trade market now that the Kings have acquired Jeff Carter.

According to Friedmans tweet: Trade deadline craziness: Lombardi telling inquiring GMs that Dustin Brown is not available. Can't wait until this is over.

The physical, rugged Brown would fit into Bostons style of play with his hard-hitting ways and hed bring a needed offensive touch with Nathan Horton indefinitely sidelined with a concussion.

The 27-year-old Brown is on his way to topping the 20-goal plateau for the fifth straight season and has scored as many as 33 goals in a season for the Kings.

Hed also fit into Bostons salary cap structure with an affordable 3.175 million cap hit for the next two years, but the price is the thing in this years trade market. Given the inflated prices in a sellers market it would take much more than Bostons first round pick to land Brown, and Boston doesnt have that type of player currency.

There are few intriguing prospects at the AHL level for Boston like Joe Colborne last season, they have no second or fourth round picks and Peter Chiarelli is loathe trading Tuukka Rask or Dougie Hamilton.

That leaves David Krejci or Milan Lucic as tradable assets designed to lure in a player of Browns ilk, and Chiarelli should once, twice and many times before blowing up part of the Stanley Cup-winning team.

I just dont see Peter blowing it up, said one source. I see a tired team right now, but this is also a team that won the Stanley Cup. It would have to take something awfully dramatic to significantly alter that teams structure.

It doesnt seem to matter at this point anyway as LA Dean Lombardi has yanked Brown from the trade market if he were ever actually attainable in the first place.

Bruins need to "find a way to start playing with a lead"

Bruins need to "find a way to start playing with a lead"

BOSTON -- There’s only so long that a team can hope to thrive, or even survive, in the NHL if they’re constantly chasing the game on the scoreboard, and chasing the puck after digging themselves a hole. The Bruins have been that team in the first couple of weeks during the regular season, and made it five times in five games that they’ve given up the game’s first goal in an eventual 4-2 loss to the Montreal Canadiens at TD Garden.

It’s a pattern that is long past getting old to Bruins head coach Claude Julien, who can’t seem to play the front-runner this season despite three comebacks that have allowed for a 3-2-0 record overall this season.

“I hope it’s not a habit. It’s certainly not what we’re looking for, but there’s no doubt. I think it’s pretty obvious that with the amount of games we’ve played, five games, we haven’t scored first,” said Julien. “We talked about that this morning, trying to get that first goal, and it hasn’t happened yet.”

The start to the game wasn’t really the problem on Saturday night as it’s been a couple of times this season. Instead the Bruins enjoyed a handful of quality scoring chances in the opening 20 minutes against the Habs, but couldn’t come through and finish off those plays when it might have meant an early lead.

Instead it lead to what Julien termed a “terrible” second period that was flat, full of mistakes and ended with the B’s trailing Montreal by a couple of goals. The Bruins scratched and clawed their way to making it a one-goal game in the third period, but that was as close as the Black and Gold would get in losing their ninth straight home game to the arch-rival Canadiens.

“It’s kind of been a story about how things are going for us this far, we’ve got to find a way to start playing with a lead. If you don’t capitalize on your chances, you see what happens when you come out [flat] in the second period,” said Torey Krug, who finished a game-worst minus-3 in the loss for the Bruins. “We had another poor second period and you know it’s kind of… you got to make sure that we put our hand on that and it doesn’t become a thing for the team this year. You see that when you don’t capitalize on chances early, that’s what’s going to happen.”

It’s been a positive development that the Bruins have shown the willingness and backbone to fight back into games after early deficits, and they showed that quality once again on Saturday night by scoring a couple of goals in the third period to keep things close. But the Bruins would be best served if they can start lighting the lamp a little earlier in these games, and see how the other half lives by playing with a comfortable lead every once in a while.