McQuaid sorry about hit on Foligno

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McQuaid sorry about hit on Foligno

KANATA, Ontario Judging by his words, and his sheepish expression, Adam McQuaid felt badly about his actions in Wednesday nights 5-2 win over the Ottawa Senators at Scotiabank Place.

In the final minutes of the second period, with the Bruins holding tightly to a 2-1 lead on the road, McQuaid saw Nick Foligno squeezing past him along the sideboards with the puck, speeding into the offensive zone and perhaps readying for the game-tying chance against Tim Thomas.

So McQuaid kicked his leg out to impedeFoligno'smomentum out of the neutral zoneand ended up making knee-on-knee contract that immediately sent the Senators forward to the ice in obvious pain.

It broke up the offensive rush Foligno was about to make, but it also earned McQuaid a five-minute major and a game misconduct -- and a whole helping of guilty feelings for a Bruins defenseman that's as honest as they come.If I could take it back, I definitely would, said McQuaid, who blocked a pair of shots and registered three hits in. It was one of those things where you go, Oh, crap, right after it happened.

"The penalty was deserved. Thats not me at all. I think thats actually my first major penalty in my career outside of the fighting calls, and I dont plan on getting any more.

McQuaid has a long history with Foligno -- the two skated together in juniors -- and the personal connection made his actions hit that much closer to home for both players during the postgame breakdown."He was just trying to slow down my progress. It was a hockey play and I don't think there was any attempt to injure," said Foligno. "I've known Quaider a long time and I know he's not that type of player."One might expect McQuaid to hear from the league about a potential fine or suspension immediately after the incident transpired, but the likelihood is he won't be penalized beyond the major penalty. There is no past history with McQuaid when it comes to the world ofsupplemental discipline, and Foligno wasn't seriously injured; he only missed one shift.

If the NHL's chief disciplinarian, Brendan Shanahan, does contact McQuaid, itll be the third Bruin he's contacted in the last month. Milan Lucic was talked to, but not fined or suspended, for his hit on Sabres goalie Ryan Miller, and Brad Marchand was fined for his slew-foot last week. McQuaid's actions willprobably will be more in line with the Lucic approach rather than the Marchand route when Shanahan reviews the video.

As one would expect, Claude Julien came to McQuaid's defense after the game.

Its hits that happen within fractions of a second," said the Bruins coach. "Certainly McQuaid isnt a dirty player and it certainly wasnt intentional. How theyre going to look at it? I dont know.

It was nice to see Foligno come back and not be injured. One guy certainly didnt do it on purpose and the other guy was okay . . .

"I wont say it harmless. But things happen with competitive players that end up getting guys injured.McQuaid already paid his price with the major penalty in a tight hockey game that could have gone either way, and the Bruins can ill afford to lose him while still waiting for Zdeno Chara to return from a lower body injury.

"Everything is on track" with Bruins prospect Zboril

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"Everything is on track" with Bruins prospect Zboril

Little more than a year after he was drafted in the middle of the first round by the Boston Bruins, some are whispering that 19-year-old Jakub Zboril isn’t going to live up to advanced billing. Clearly the Czech defenseman took a step back for the Saint John Sea Dogs after being taken 13th by the Bruins in last year’s draft, and dropped to six goals and 20 points in 50 games in the QMJHL while watching second round pick Jeremy Lauzon pass him by on the prospect hype chart.

Perhaps the more concerning thing have been the whispers about an erratic work ethic and bad habits in Zboril’s game, a couple of criticisms that haven’t exactly gone away since the Bruins signed him to a contract last summer following development camp. Bruins assistant general manager Scott Bradley was asked about those concerns with the young D-man as he heads into an important training camp with Boston this fall, and didn’t seem all that concerned about his first round pick being a “bust.”

“I think his offensive production was down, and that he struggled a little bit coming out of the gate” said Bradley of Zboril, who had 13 goals and 33 points in 44 games during his first season in the Quebec Major Junior League prior to getting drafted by Boston. “But he had a strong playoff. Everybody forgets that he’s a gritty guy, and a strong player that moves the puck. The thing that stands out about him are that his numbers are down from last year.

“But everything is on track with him. He’s going to come to camp and hopefully shines, and has a good year this year…patience.

“I think it’s great if the second rounders are on par with him: the [Brandon] Carlos and the [Jeremy] Lauzons. If you look at the whole of our draft last year you can’t rule out the first eight picks that they might play [in the NHL]. We’re excited. Donnie and I were at the Memorial Cup, and Lauzon raised our eyebrows every night that he played. You’d come away with a good feeling like this kid plays hard, plays the Bruins style, moves the puck and is tough. Obviously [you had to like] what Carlo did when he was brought in [to Providence] at the end. It just bodes well for what we have coming this year. Zboril and Lauzon are probably going back to junior, but Carlo is going to get a long look.”

The young Czech D-man is still at a point where his stock can still shoot higher than it’s ever been with a good showing at training camp, and a strong season for the Sea Dogs entering into his professional hockey career. But he can’t afford to go through another down season, or that talk of him being a first round bust is only going to get louder and stronger.

Morning Skate: Stamkos destined to wind up somewhere new

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Morning Skate: Stamkos destined to wind up somewhere new

Here are the links from all around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while happy to be back in the city of Boston.

*The Buffalo Sabres don’t sound happy about the accusations against Evander Kane that cropped up during NHL Draft weekend, why would they be?

*NHL teams can now start discussing free agents, exchanging ideas with them and start the chase up to July 1.

*PHT writer James O’Brien has the biggest winners in the 2016 NHL Draft. Here’s a shocker: the Bruins aren’t among them.

*A good piece from Alex Prewitt on the importance of the land line phones on the draft floor during NHL Draft weekend.

*The Edmonton Oilers are another team that didn’t come out of draft weekend with a defenseman, and are still in search of their back end help.

*A nice piece on Philadelphia Flyers draft pick Pascal Laberge, who could have been plucked by the Bruins at No. 29 rather than Trent Frederic.

*Bruce Garrioch has his Sunday NHL notes, and says that Steven Stamkos appears destined to play somewhere other than Tampa Bay.

*For something completely different: Jonah Keri has TV critic Alan Sepinwall on his podcast, and one can only hope it’s to explain how and why he could have disliked last week’s episode of Game of Thrones.