Lucic takes issue with being called 'cattle'

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Lucic takes issue with being called 'cattle'

FRAMINGHAM This might not exactly be a news flash, but NHL players apparently arent wild about being branded as cattle by NHL executives. That goes double during a time of labor strife.

In an interview with Island Sports News, Detroit Red Wings senior vice-president Jimmy Devellano made the following comments that earned him a 250,000 fine from the NHL.

I will tell you this: The owners can basically be viewed as the Ranch, and the players, and me included, are the cattle, Devellano said. The owners own the Ranch and allow the players to eat there. That's the way its always been and that's the way it will be forever. And the owners simply aren't going to let a union push them around. It's not going to happen."

The cattle comment begs the question as to when the last time anybody saw 20,000 excited people show up at a farm to watch a bunch of cows graze, but we digress.

Milan Lucic was polite, but rightfully put off, when he heard Devellano had singled him out, saying the he should be grateful hes making 6 million a year on his new contract. The Bs power forward, of course, agreed to a three-year, 18 million contract in the hours leading up to the Sept. 15 lockout date, and that clearly struck a chord with the well-respected Wings exec.

Devellano pointed to Lucic as the perfect example of an NHL player that should roll over and let the owners dictate whatever terms they like in CBA negotiations out of sheer appreciation for their contracts.

Yes, the owners are billionaires. Good on them, they deserve it, but they also make their employees millionaires. Not a bad trade off for a guy like Lucic getting what, 6 million dollars a year? said Devellano. I mean good on him too, but he should be grateful. Understand though that these players want for nothing . . . it's first class this, first class that, meal allowances, travel money on the road, the whole shebang. Offer sheets don't hurt the players one bit."

CSNNE.com caught up with Lucic on Monday morning making a visit to the Mary E. Stapleton Elementary School in Framingham for a question and answer session with the students sponsored by NMTW Community Credit Union. The Bs power forward had heard about Devellanos comments, and still couldnt quite understand why he had been singled out in a wide-ranging conversation with the candid Devellano.

"I guess I must be Grade A prime beef. I think were pretty good cattle if youre looking at it that way," Lucic said with a laugh. You definitely as a person dont like to be called cattle. Youd think people would treat you better than as just an animal. Obviously hes got his name on the Cup a lot of times. Im not going to say anything to disrespect him. But he said what he said and I kind of laughed at it. It is what it is.

He singled me out and I dont know where or why he even singled me out. For me from an athletes perspective you look at Devellano and what hes done in his hockey career, and respect what hes done for the game.

There were some eyebrows raised at the 6 million per year price tag on Lucics contract, and perhaps thats why Devellano went there with him. But Lucic is one of only three players that have accumulated 25 goals and 100 PIMs over each of the last two years, and hes still yet to hit his hockey prime at 24 years old.

After the school visit this morning Lucic was headed off to lunch with Celebrities for Charity Exec Cleon Daskalakis before an afternoon school visit in Lowell.

No word on if Lucic was going to skip eating a hamburger to retain solidarity with the rest of the cattle.

Former Bruins star Ray Bourque 'in unfamiliar territory'

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Former Bruins star Ray Bourque 'in unfamiliar territory'

ANDOVER, Mass. — Former Boston Bruins star Ray Bourque, who's facing a drunken driving charge, says he accepts the responsibility of his actions.

Bourque was charged Friday night with operating under the influence of alcohol and following too closely. He posted bail and was released.

"For the first time in my life, I find myself in unfamiliar territory," Bourque said in a statement released Sunday. "I am not happy about the situation I put myself into."

Andover Police Chief Patrick Keefe said the 55-year-old Bourque was arrested about 11:30 p.m. after his Mercedes-Benz rear-ended a minivan in a construction zone in the city. No injuries were reported.

Bourque is to be arraigned in Lawrence District Court. Police haven't provided a date.

According to The Boston Globe, Bourque currently owns Tresca, a restaurant on Boston's North End.

'Everything is on track' with Bruins prospect Zboril

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'Everything is on track' with Bruins prospect Zboril

Little more than a year after he was drafted in the middle of the first round by the Boston Bruins, some are whispering that 19-year-old Jakub Zboril isn’t going to live up to advanced billing. Clearly the Czech defenseman took a step back for the Saint John Sea Dogs after being taken 13th by the Bruins in last year’s draft, and dropped to six goals and 20 points in 50 games in the QMJHL while watching second round pick Jeremy Lauzon pass him by on the prospect hype chart.

Perhaps the more concerning thing have been the whispers about an erratic work ethic and bad habits in Zboril’s game, a couple of criticisms that haven’t exactly gone away since the Bruins signed him to a contract last summer following development camp. Bruins assistant general manager Scott Bradley was asked about those concerns with the young D-man as he heads into an important training camp with Boston this fall, and didn’t seem all that concerned about his first round pick being a “bust.”

“I think his offensive production was down, and that he struggled a little bit coming out of the gate” said Bradley of Zboril, who had 13 goals and 33 points in 44 games during his first season in the Quebec Major Junior League prior to getting drafted by Boston. “But he had a strong playoff. Everybody forgets that he’s a gritty guy, and a strong player that moves the puck. The thing that stands out about him are that his numbers are down from last year.

“But everything is on track with him. He’s going to come to camp and hopefully shines, and has a good year this year…patience.

“I think it’s great if the second rounders are on par with him: the [Brandon] Carlos and the [Jeremy] Lauzons. If you look at the whole of our draft last year you can’t rule out the first eight picks that they might play [in the NHL]. We’re excited. Donnie and I were at the Memorial Cup, and Lauzon raised our eyebrows every night that he played. You’d come away with a good feeling like this kid plays hard, plays the Bruins style, moves the puck and is tough. Obviously [you had to like] what Carlo did when he was brought in [to Providence] at the end. It just bodes well for what we have coming this year. Zboril and Lauzon are probably going back to junior, but Carlo is going to get a long look.”

The young Czech D-man is still at a point where his stock can still shoot higher than it’s ever been with a good showing at training camp, and a strong season for the Sea Dogs entering into his professional hockey career. But he can’t afford to go through another down season, or that talk of him being a first round bust is only going to get louder and stronger.