Khudobin leads B's to 3-1 win over Senators

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Khudobin leads B's to 3-1 win over Senators

OTTAWA The Bruins and Senators have been on a seeming collision course since very early in the hockey season, but they played nice in their final meeting before the playoffs.

There were no fights, no truly questionable hits and little scoring in a goaltending clinic put on in Bostons 3-1 victory over the Senators at Scotiabank Place. The victory was a coming out party for Kazakhstan native Anton Khudobin, who made 44 saves in his first game donning a Black and Gold Bruins sweater.

Erik Karlsson whiffed on a wide open one-timer at an empty net in the final minutes of the third period that could have given Ottawa their point to clinch the No. 7 seed, but it didnt happen.

The loss means that theres still a possibility the Bruins could face Washington in the first round if both Ottawa and the Capitals lose in regulation during their final games of the season.

Khudobin was supported by a first period strike from Benoit Pouliot and a second period score from Greg Zanon. The Pouliot goal was a pretty give-and-go with Brian Rolston while the Zanon game-winner eluded Ben Bishops glove hand after it was launched from the left point.

Jason Spezza got the Senators on the board when his hot shot from the slot bounced off Andrew Ferences ankle, ricocheted off the post and then bounced off the Bs goaltender on its way to the back of the net.

But the story was Khudobin, who made a dizzying array of saves with every method imaginable while spelling Thomas against the Senators. He snuffed out a Daniel Alfredsson wraparound at the post, flashed a quick glove hand on his sizzling shot from the high slot and stoned Nick Foligno on a couple of bids right around the net among his highlight reel stops.

Milan Lucic added the insurance tally for his 26th goal of the season.

Braintree Municipal Golf helps out those with special needs

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Braintree Municipal Golf helps out those with special needs

The Braintree Municipal Golf Course helps people with special needs by giving them a chance to take some swings. Here's Kevin Walsh with the full report on a wonderful story.

Three things we learned from the Red Sox’ 10-9 loss to the Blue Jays

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Three things we learned from the Red Sox’ 10-9 loss to the Blue Jays

Three things we learned from the Boston Red Sox’ 10-9 loss to the Toronto Blue Jays…

1) Toronto’s offense can never be taken lightly.

Coming into the series, the Blue Jays had scored 197 runs, putting them in the middle of the pack among all Major League teams and averaging four runs per game. In the two games against Boston, they’ve scored 17 runs.

So an offense that had appeared to be dormant has been woken up thanks to some subpar Red Sox pitching.

It seems like these two teams are very similar and could be in opposite positions just as easily. The Blue Jays are only three behind in the win column (five in the loss), so Boston needs to win David Price’s Sunday start to widen the gap and cut their three-game skid.

2) Craig Kimbrel is only effective for so long.

Boston’s closer wasn’t giving excuses following Saturday’s game -- and this isn’t one either.

Saturday’s 39-pitch performance wasn’t just his season-high, but his career high in pitches.

This not only resulted in a drop in Kimbrel’s velocity, but it exposed flaws in the Red Sox’ pen. Kimbrel is truly a one-inning guy, so if Junichi Tazawa and Koji Uehara can’t get him the ball, he’s useless.

And it seems like Uehara won’t be used on back-to-back days frequently in the near future, so Boston won’t be able to use Tazawa in a seventh inning role with much consistency.

Somewhere along the way Dave Dombrowski will need to find another reliever for the back-end of the bullpen.

3) Offense can only take a team so far.

Both teams had big offensive days, in large part because pitchers from both sides made a lot of mistakes -- but they still took advantage of them.

Had the Red Sox been the home team in this contest, there’s no reason to believe they wouldn’t have won -- just based on the progression of the game and ignoring any statistical splits.

If the Red Sox are serious about making the postseason, they need pitching to pick up the slack once in a while. Because when they hit the road late in the year, games like will slip away when quality pitching is lacking.