Hanson ready to bring Slap Shot legacy to Bruins

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Hanson ready to bring Slap Shot legacy to Bruins

NORTH SMITHFIELD, R.I. Christian Hanson said it was a no-brainer to sign with the Bruins this summer.

The son of one of the infamous Hanson Brothers from Slap Shot movie fame donning Black and Gold, and splitting time between the AHL Providence Bruins and the NHL parent club in Boston certainly looks and feels like a marriage made in hockey heaven.

The 6-foot-4, 230-pound Hanson isnt a foil-wearing brawler like his cinematic dad, David -- a role that he still reprises in rinks all over the world. But hes a big-bodied center capable of playing third and fourth line roles.

Hansons game is winning face-offs, screening goaltenders, playing a tangible physical role and providing occasional offense while paying attention to the two-way game. In other words hes the type of player that Claude Julien will take notice of, and hes the exact kind of forward that will be useful should injuries gnaw away at the NHL roster once the regular season begins.

His best season game in 2009-10 when he played 69 games between the Maple Leafs and the Marlies, and finished with 14 goals and 38 points, and theres no reason to think he cant reproduce that in ProvidenceBoston.

Hanson was just glad to be back on the ice this past weekend for the start of P-Bruins camp after wrist surgery put him out of commission last February.

Its good to be back out there and get my feet and hands underneath me," he said. "Getting into the high temp is something you cant really recreate while skating over the summer. I can contribute a bit offensively, but hopefully everybody sees that Im a guy that goes hard on every shift. I wear my heart on my sleeve and Ill do anything to win. Thats what I feel like the Bruins are all about.

Hanson said signing with the Bruins was a natural fit for him after spending the last few years playing against them while racking up 42 NHL games in the Toronto Maple Leafs organization. Hanson wants to fit right in with the organizational philosophy, and his words show he holds a clear understanding of what wearing a Bs sweater is all about.

Theyre an organization that fits my kind of game, said Hanson. You look at their forte and how they play hockey, and theyre a hard-working, honest, blue collar type of team. Thats my game.

It works. They won the Stanley Cup two years ago and theyre contenders every year. You look at the type of players they have: Milan Lucic is the ideal power forward. I think hes the best in the game. They have multiple players that go out there and make you say Holy Cow . . . those guys want to win. Thats what you need to have out there.

As for Bs fans that want to celebrate Hansons family legacy by dressing up as the Hanson Brothers or wearing their trademark eyewear, the center said to bring it on with a wide smile.

He never gets tired of answering questions about his dad, and never stops being proud of him either.

I 100 percent love it, Its one of the greatest things, said Hanson when asked about the Slap Shot legacy. I am so proud of him and what hes done. Right now hes in Vancouver doing a six-games-in-seven-nights tour for charity and theyre playing against local policemen and firefighters for charity.

The movie was made in 1977 and theyve been touring consistently since 1995. Theyve raised tens of millions of dollars over the years. For him to be able to do something he loves while benefiting so many people out there, I couldnt be more proud of him.

So dont forget to put on the foil for the inevitable Hanson Brothers Night that will happen in Providence this season, and watch for the knowing smirk on Christians face while hes playing amidst the Hanson hoopla out on the ice.

Patriots players got a refresher on NFL social media policy because of Brown

Patriots players got a refresher on NFL social media policy because of Brown

FOXBORO -- Antonio Brown's live stream of coach Mike Tomlin's postgame speech on Sunday had a ripple effect that traveled all the way to New England: Just in case Patriots players weren't familiar with the league's social-media policy, they were reminded of it this week. 

"We were reminded of that," receiver Chris Hogan said. "I’m not sure what the timing is, but obviously, I don’t think we’ll see guys doing that in the locker room."

Players are prohibited from using social media in the locker room until media outlets have been given an opportunity to talk to players following games. Brown's Facebook Live video, which garnered national attention almost as soon as it went online, was shot well before the visitor's locker room at Arrowhead Stadium opened following Pittsburgh's win over Kansas City.

"We have a team policy on that," special teams captain Matthew Slater said. "Strictly enforced. We go from there."

Of course part of the reason the video became as widely disseminated as it did was because it caught Tomlin calling the Patriots "a--holes."

"I have a lot of respect for Coach Tomlin," Slater said when asked about Tomlin's speech. "I appreciate the way he prepares his team. I’ve had a good working relationship with him over the years, and it will continue to be that way."

Both Slater and Hogan insisted that their focus will be trained solely on preparing for what Tomlin and his players will do when they arrive to Gillette Stadium Sunday night -- not what they say leading up to kickoff.

"You come in here, you're automatically bought into what we preach here, what coach [Bill] Belichick preaches," Hogan said. "It's football. We're 100 percent football here. It's not about anything outside. Between the media or whatever it is outside of football, whatever we're doing. When we come here, it's 100 percent football. That's all we're focused on is the opponent we're playing that week."

Bradley (Achilles) 'felt good' during return to Celtics lineup

Bradley (Achilles) 'felt good' during return to Celtics lineup

WALTHAM, Mass. – As the final horn blew in Boston’s 108-98 win over Charlotte on Monday night, the game was a win-win kind of night for Avery Bradley.

The Celtics (26-15) continue rolling over opponents at the TD Garden, and he played a relatively pain-free 33 minutes in the win.

It was Bradley’s first game back after missing the previous four with a strained right Achilles injury.

And the fact that he was back on the practice floor on Tuesday (be it a light practice, mind you), bodes well for his injury being a thing of the past now.

“I felt good. It wasn’t sore at all in the game,” Bradley said. “I felt I was moving good. After the game I was a little sore and this morning, but otherwise I felt good.”

Despite Boston being 4-1 this season when Bradley doesn’t play, he has immense value to this Celtics team at both ends of the floor.

Offensively he has been Boston’s second-leading scorer most of this season and currently averages a career-high 17.7 points per game along with 6.9 rebounds which is also a career high.

And defensively, Bradley is coming off a season in which he was named to the NBA’s all-Defensive First Team for the first time.

Any questions or concerns about the Achilles affecting his play defensively were put to rest Monday night when he put the defensive clamps on Nicolas Batum who missed nine of his 11 shots from the field while primarily being guarded by Bradley.

Now his offense, that’s another story.

Bradley failed to reach double digits scoring for the first time this season as he missed seven of his nine shots on Monday to finish with just five points.

But part of that had to do with Bradley passing up shots he normally takes, as well as him missing some he normally knocks down.

Considering his lay-off and the rhythm his teammates have been in shooting the ball in his absence, Bradley wisely decided to get his defensive bearings on track and gradually bring his offensive game around. 

“I have to get my (shooting) rhythm back,” said Bradley who is making a career-best 40.9 percent of his 3-pointers this season. “I’m fine. I’m looking forward to tomorrow’s game.”