Haggerty: Bruins out to right last year's wrongs

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Haggerty: Bruins out to right last year's wrongs

RALEIGH, NC The Bruins just keep blazing through the checklist and righting some of the wrongs from last season.

The biggest and most overarching hockey penance for Boston involves making everybody forget their stupefying, disappointing first-round loss to the Washington Capitals. But there are smaller, easier missions to be accomplished in the short term, and one of them was knocking around the Carolina Hurricanes after the young, hungry 'Canes club slapped them around last season.

Carolina swept them in a four-game regular season last year, outscored them 14-5 in those four games and gave the Bruins as much trouble as any team in the NHL has over the last few years. So the Bruins went out Monday night with a purpose and scored a pair of goals in the first seven minutes of the game to make a clear, dominant opening statement.

The Hurricanes made a comeback in the middle of the game, of course, but the Bruins opened and closed with authority to take the 5-3 victory at PNC Arena that elevated them to 4-0-1 on the season.

We still remembered what happened last year, said Nathan Horton. They took all four games from us. They really play us hard and we knew that coming in. We knew it was going to be a tight game going in and thats exactly what it was.

We played well and the big thing is that we got the win. In the end that was all that mattered.

The Bruins certainly hit some valleys within the 60 minutes in Carolina. Shawn Thornton and the fourth line couldnt get the puck out of the zone at the end of the second period, and that turned into a Jeff Skinner goal when he got the puck with a clear angle toward the net.

Less than a minute later, the Hurricanes scored again when Dougie Hamilton had already sped up the ice on an anticipated offensive rush, and Chris Kelly was left to lug the puck out of the D-zone with Alex Semin bearing down on him. That turned into an Eric Staal bomb from the slot that tied up the game after Kelly turned the puck over near the blue line, and things looked dicey.

Thats when Claude Julien reminded his skaters they still had 20 minutes to exact their revenge on Carolina, and they looked properly motivated while outshooting the Hurricanes by a 17-8 margin in the final 20 minutes.

If anything those two goals we gave up at the end of the second, we got caught standing still or the defense got caught moving the wrong way, said Julien. I went in and said Guys, the last time I checked weve got a 3-3 hockey game so you cant afford to hang your heads and drag it into the third. Weve got to go win a 20 minute third period. The guys did a good job of answering that call.

It eventually took a Hamilton cross-ice beauty of a pass to David Krejci during a wild scramble in front of the net in the final three minutes of regulation to bring the Bruins their fourth victory in five games. Tyler Seguin's empty net score for the puck prodigys first goal of the season was simply icing on the cake.

The game contained much more positive than negative for the Bs despite the tight score: the Bruins scored a pair of power play goals, their PK unit continued to dominate and kicked in a shorthanded goal, Horton scored on a breathtaking rush from the neutral zone that trumpeted just how solid hes been to start the season, and Boston got a resounding yes on the question of whether Anton Khudobin will be capable stepping up as the clubs backup goaltender.

They came back there at the end of the second and we were still tied, said Horton. We knew we could win, so we kept pushing and it came right down to the goals at the end.

If you told us that we would be all even going into the final period against them we would have taken that.

With Carolina licking their wounds after a physical defeat at the hands of a Bruins team that has yet to be beaten in regulation, the Bruins now move on to new peaks to scale.

Whats the new challenge for the Black and Gold?

Its about proving they can handle the back-to-back game situations that will arrive fast and furiously during the abbreviated season, and coming to play against a New Jersey Devils team that has not yet lost a game in regulation this season. The Devils had the luxury of sitting around in Boston last night waiting for the Bruins as the B's resided in NASCAR country for their game in Carolina.

Now Boston is the hunted rather than the hunter.

Thats because the Bruins dominated the Devils in four games last season despite New Jersey making it all the way to the Stanley Cup Finals. Talented layers like David Clarkson and Ilya Kovalchuk will be looking to reverse that trend on the Black and Gold without their captain, Zach Parise. Unlike the Philadelphia Flyers, the Washington Capitals and the Florida Panthers, the Bruins are off to an excellent start this season while taking full advantage of the familiarity and large number of players coming back from Europe that gave them an early advantage on the competition.

Now the challenge is on for the Bruins to keep the Black and Gold train moving as Monday night kicked off a stretch of playing four games in six days. On the bright side, they were 9-4 in the second game of back-to-back situations last season and outscored their opponents by nearly 30 goals.

We learned from last year. We had a pretty bad start. This year we were ready to go and we know its important to get points in a short season, said David Krejci, who smoked the game-winning shot with 1:50 left to go in the third period. Weve got nine out of ten points and thats pretty good. But we need to keep it going.

Its time to prove they can pile up points when the season starts transforming into a compacted grind rather than the leisurely pace they experienced over the first week-plus of the season.

Just mark that one down as more goal on a season full of prove it moments for the Black and Gold as they make the slow, laborious march back up to the NHL mountaintop.

Wednesday, Jan. 18: Landeskog wants to stay in Colorado

Wednesday, Jan. 18: Landeskog wants to stay in Colorado

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while thoroughly enjoying Nick Offerman co-hosting on the Today Show this morning.

*Gabriel Landeskog knows his name has been mentioned in trade rumors with teams like the Bruins, but he wants to stay with the Colorado Avalanche.

*The New York Rangers are facing a goalie crisis for the first time in 11 years as Henrik Lundqvist is beginning to show signs of hockey mortality.

*PHT writer James O’Brien has the New York Islanders seeking to speak with fired Florida coach Gerard Gallant about their new opening after firing Jack Capuano.

*Ondrej Pavelec has been brought back from the AHL to Winnipeg to rescue the Jets from their goaltending situation, and he wants to stay for as long as he can.

*Rene Bourque has reached the 700 game mark in his NHL career with the Colorado Avalanche, and he hopes to keep it going.

*Young star Jack Eichel’s hunger for greatness could certainly lend itself to a leadership role with the Buffalo Sabres

*For something completely different: Hollywood is thinking of rebooting “White Men Can’t Jump” and this is simply the worst idea ever. I’d rather watch a movie with Woody and Snipes 25 years later than a lame reboot.

 


 

Haggerty: Bruins would be foolish to trade Brandon Carlo

Haggerty: Bruins would be foolish to trade Brandon Carlo

There’s been smoke for weeks signaling trade talks between the Boston Bruins and the Colorado Avalanche, and things are reportedly heating up with the Bruins potentially reaching a tipping point with their subpar play on the ice. According to Bleacher Report columnist Adrian Dater, things may be progressing between the two teams because the Bruins are beginning to entertain the idea of trading away 20-year-old top pairing rookie defenseman Brandon Carlo.

Bruins Director of Player Personnel John Ferguson Jr. was expected to be out in Colorado scouting the Avalanche/Blackhawks game on Tuesday night, and perhaps getting a long look at players like Gabriel Landeskog, Matt Duchene and Tyson Barrie among others.

The expectation is that 24-year-old Landeskog is in the middle of these trade discussions, and that he would be one of the players targeted by a Bruins team that could use more size on the wing, and more players that can put the puck in the net. Certainly Landeskog has done that in his brief NHL career after being a No. 2 overall pick, and has four 20-goal seasons on his resume prior to a disappointing, injury-plagued current season in Colorado.

The word around the league was that talks fizzled between the Bruins and Avs previously when Joe Sakic asked about the availability of the Colorado Springs native Carlo, and those discussions hit the same crunching roadblock that Winnipeg did in discussions with Boston about Jacob Trouba.

Perhaps that has changed in the last 24 hours after Cam Neely and Don Sweeney watched their Bruins completely no-show against the worst team in the Eastern Conference, the New York Islanders, on Monday afternoon. Now one would expect that Bruins management is getting desperate feeling that a third “Did Not Qualify” for the Stanley Cup playoffs could be in their future if they don’t make a bold, swift move to shake up their dazed hockey club.

But let’s not pull any punches here. The entire Bruins management group should be fired on the spot if they trade a 20-year-old, top pairing shutdown defenseman on an entry level contract like Carlo unless they are getting a bona fide superstar in return. Carlo, Charlie McAvoy and David Pastrnak should all be young, untouchable assets for a Bruins organization that is years away from legitimately holding a chance at a Stanley Cup.

Landeskog is not a bona fide superstar. He’s a good player that’s topped out at 26 goals and 65 points in the NHL, but he’s also the Captain on a horrendous, underachieving Avalanche team over the last three years.

If the price were right for Landeskog it would make all the sense in the world for the Bruins to deal him, but it’s a giant honking red flag that Colorado is looking to unload a player like him that’s signed for a reasonable $5.5 million price tag over the next four seasons. Teams don’t trade young players like that with term unless there’s more to the story, and that’s something the Bruins would do well to consider before giving up a player that could be a top-4 shutdown defenseman in Boston for the next 10 years.

Teams like the Bruins that are in reloading mode also shouldn’t be trading 20-year-old players for 24-year-old players that have already cashed in on their second contract. That’s exactly how the Bruins can get right back into salary cap trouble, and do it with a team that’s producing far less than the Peter Chiarelli groups that were at least still making the playoffs.  

Certainly the Bruins have other young D-men like Charlie McAvoy, Jakub Zboril and Jeremy Lauzon coming down the pipeline, but none of those defensemen are in the mold of a true shutdown D like the 6-foot-5 Carlo. With Zdeno Chara in the final few years of his career with the Black and Gold, the B’s are going to need Carlo to slide into that defensive stopper role given his size, strength, wing span and willingness to do the dirty work the D-zone.

That goes beyond the simple fact that rebuilding the back end with ALL of those young stud D-men is the best way to actually build the Bruins back up into a legitimate Eastern Conference power. 

It would be a giant mistake for the Bruins to ship away a player like Carlo with the hope Landeskog can put Boston over the hump for the playoffs this season, and perhaps ease some of the intense pressure currently weighing on Sweeney and Neely. That kind of desperate move smacks of doing it for all of the wrong reasons, and that’s one way to ensure that the Bruins will never escape the web of mediocrity that they’re currently caught in.