Haggerty: Bruins just ran out of gas

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Haggerty: Bruins just ran out of gas

BOSTON -- The Bruins put on a competitive face and said they were as hungry as theyve ever been entering the postseason.

They talked of repeating as Stanley Cup champs and making the kind of NHL history that hadnt been seen since some pretty great Detroit Red Wings made their mark on the NHL in the late 1990s. But action is a little more difficult than words when it comes to repeating as Stanley Cup champs, and the Bruins found that out swiftly and consistently in dropping a seven-game series to the Washington Capitals.

Theres a reason that hockey dynasties have gone the way of the Dodo bird and the dinosaurs, and the Bruins found that out firsthand.

The final straw was a 2-1 overtime loss to the Caps at TD Garden on a Joel Ward game-winning goal that arrived after a Benoit Pouliot dump attempt was intercepted at the blue line. The Capitals caught the Bruins in a line change when the puck was reversed back into the Bruins end of the ice, and that was that.

The elimination defeat served as the last stinging reminder to the Black and Gold that heavy is the crown on the head of the Stanley Cup champs.

The 107 games played last season between the regular season and the playoffs, the short two-month offseason that followed their June 15 Cup victory in Vancouver in Game 7 of the Finals and a grueling regular season where every team threw their hardest roundhouse punches at the Bruins finally ended up taking its toll.

Theres a reason the Bruins became the seventh Stanley Cup champ in the last nine seasons to fail to get out of the first round the year following their capture of the Cup. Theres also a good reason why each of the four teams from last years conference finals are no longer alive and kicking in the postseason. One didnt qualify for the playoffs (Tampa Bay) and the other three were shocking first round casualties.

For a team like the Bruins that endured three seven game-series last year en route to the Cup, there was simply little left in the energy reserves when it came to playoff time.Once digging down deep was required the Bruins found themselves without a shovel for the first time in a long time.

It was a tough season. There were difficult periods at times. I looked around the locker room at many different points during this season and saw some very tired guys, said Tim Thomas, who showed the fatigue as much as anybody else with middling save percentage numbers during the regular season and playoffs. Thats no excuse, thats just reality.

They still found a way to finish second in the conference, get ourselves home ice for the playoffs here, and give ourselves at least an opportunity to get to game seven OT and take it to that next step.

For all intents and purposes the Bruins appeared to be destined to repeat in November and December when they were the NHLs best team and rebounded strongly from a 3-7 start to the season.

They never again attained that high level of play during the remainder of the regular season, and Claude Julien saw a hockey club that didnt have the same kind of oomph once the playoffs commenced this time around.

Were not going to stand here and nitpick at our team. But when I look at this hockey club, what it went through last year, and you look at teams that have been through that situation and how theyve struggled throughout the year, we still finished at the top of our division, we still finished second in the conference, and we had to really grind it out, said Claude Julien. It was a challenging year for our guys, and it was a challenging series as well. Washington made it tough on us, and they deserve a lot of credit for the way they played: the number of shots they blocked and how they helped their goaltender throughout.

A young goaltender played extremely well, so lets not forget to give the Capitals a lot of credit for how they handled us. And at the end of the day, when you look at it the team wasnt playing its best hockey in the series. Before this day started, you just hope that you can get through this Game Seven and hope to pick some momentum up as you move forward in the playoffs. But you had to get through this game, and we werent able to do that.

The energy reserve and unbridled enthusiasm required to pick up momentum in the playoffs just couldnt be consistently maintained by the Bruins. They showed admirable fight in spurts. The champions pride rose up during Game 3 in Washington DC when Milan Lucic and Brad Marchand stirred the emotional pot to a needed road win, and the Bruins appeared to find the necessary level for ultimate success.

But they couldnt maintain that level even in the next game in Washington DC, and they couldnt find anything close to it for 60 minute efforts throughout the series.

Lucic went seven games without a goal in his second straight no-show in the first round of the playoffs, Marchand didnt have his infectious energy on a consistent basis and David Krejci finished off a forgettable playoff performance by losing 10-of-15 face-offs while trying to step up for the injured Patrice Bergeron.

Zdeno Chara wasnt his dominant self at either end of the ice and suffered some uncharacteristic mental breakdowns throughout the series, and the bottom two Bs forward lines were outplayed by their Capitals counterparts when it mattered most in Game 7. While the Capitals were throwing themselves in front of heat-seeking missile pucks and the bottom lines were playing with fire in their hearts, the Bruins couldnt fight their way to the front of the net for loose pucks that were there throughout the seven-game set with Braden Holtby.

The whole year has been a mental challenge for our guys. Physically, I dont think its that big of an issue because guys are in great shape, but the mental part of it is just a challenge. It just seems like, even getting into these playoffs, it seemed like it was just yesterday wed gone through it. So things happen fast, said Julien. The summer was short, guys came back, and now youre asking them to re-focus for a whole season, and thats not an easy task to do.

We had a slow start, and we finally picked it up again, and midway through the season, February, we started having our struggles again. We tried to pick it up at the end of the year, which we did a little bit. But I dont think our team was in tune as well as it was at this time last year.

Instead the Bruins didnt pack the same kind of emotional punch and their core players looked like lesser versions of themselves aside from Tyler Seguin, Dennis Seidenberg and Rich Peverley. The Bruins never consistently showed the same hunger as a Washington Capitals team that sits on the precipice of being dismantled if they dont have a strong showing during the playoffs. The disparity in desperation and frenzied playoff-level focus was readily apparent throughout the series, and the uphill battle for most Bruins players was obvious.

Nobody wants to say there was relief the season was over for a Bruins team that has set high expectations for itself year in and year out.

But there also wasnt the kind of emotional pain and tangible crestfallen mood thats consistent in a dressing room when realization sets in that a season is over.

Instead Milan Lucic was left in the Bs dressing room at the end of the postgame availability reliving the grueling gauntlet as reigning Cup champs. The Bs power forward vowed to be bigger, better and badder next season after a longer offseason to recharge the batteries, and he needs to be after a bad playoff performance.

It was real tough. I dont want to make excuses, but it was real tough to get yourself mentally prepared to start that season, to get ready for the grind of the season and even the playoffs. Especially ending the way that we did with 22 games in the last 40 days of the season, you know, youre definitely feeling it after that, admitted Lucic. But like I said, you dont want to make excuses. But now with this time off we wont have any excuses for next year. Weve got to do whatever we can to get our rest and come in healthy and ready to play next season.

There will also be that helpful sting of their hockey season being done in April for the first time in five seasons. That will give the Bruins the attitude and energy needed to take down formidable foes in the playoffs.

Because the action-packed focus was missing against a Washington Capitals team that was clearly beatable.

Ultimately the better team prevailed when the Bruins couldnt rekindle the kind of fire it required to take it to the glorious next level last season, and fulfilled an NHL prophecy thats become dogma over the last decade.

Sounds like Blues won’t be trading Shattenkirk

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Sounds like Blues won’t be trading Shattenkirk

So, it looks like the Bruins will have to find a puck-moving, “transitional” defenseman elsewhere as Blues D-man Kevin Shattenkirk may be off the market for a while.

Blues President of Hockey Operations and GM Doug Armstrong jumped on with the NHL Tonight crew on NHL Network Friday afternoon and was asked point blank about the trade rumors surrounding the former BU defenseman in the wake of both Troy Brouwer and David Backes bolting in free agency.

It would appear things have changed for the St. Louis bottom line and now the Blues will start the season with Shattenkirk while monitoring how the roster fares during the season.

Considering that the Blues are coming off a good, deep playoff run, it may be that Shattenkirk doesn’t get dealt at all.

“I think the Kevin Shattenkirk thing grew on a life of its own at the draft. What I’ve said internally here is that we’re excited to have Kevin Shattenkirk as a part of our team. In the NHL now you see all the players hitting free agency and moving to [different] teams,” said Armstrong to the NHL Tonight crew. 

“Our goal is to try and get Kevin signed if we can, or start the year and him a good. We started last year with Troy Brouwer and David Backes in the same situation, we had 107 or 108 points and made it to the semifinals. I think if you’re always trying to trade players as they enter the last year of their contracts, I don’t know that you’re ever going to have a really good team if you’re running away from free agency. Free agency is part of our game, and you make those free agent decisions. 

“If you get to a part of the year and you have guys that are unrestricted and your team is no good, then you make those decisions. But if you have a good team and you have guys that are unrestricted, you just play it out.”

So, where do the Bruins turn after it was clear the Blues weren’t that interested in trading Shattenkirk by asking for both first-round picks and David Pastrnak at last weekend’s NHL draft? 

With Patrice Bergeron, David Krejci and David Backes all signed to big contracts, perhaps the Bruins explore dealing Krejci for another one of the available transition D-man on the market. Anaheim’s Cam Fowler comes to mind immediately, and Colorado’s Tyson Barrie is another player that could certainly help the Black and Gold if they’re looking to trade up for a high-caliber, top-four puck-moving type.

Still, it sure doesn’t sound like it will be Shattenkirk, 27, who will be looking for an deal in the neighborhood of seven years, $49 million from whatever team signs him to his next contract. 

Lucic heads to Edmonton with seven-year, $42M deal

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Lucic heads to Edmonton with seven-year, $42M deal

The Bruins had made a little noise about a Milan Lucic reunion last weekend at the draft.

Instead, Lucic, 28, will be reunited with former Bruins general manager Peter Chiarelli, who now runs the Edmonton Oilers. The ex-Bruins forward agreed to a seven-year, $42 million contract with Edmonton on the opening day of NHL free agency, Lucic's agent, Gerry Johansson confirmed to the Associated Press.

Lucic, traded to the Los Angeles Kings in a draft night deal last year by the B’s, had  20 goals and 35 assists in his lone season in L.A.