Five thoughts from the first period of Game 3

Five thoughts from the first period of Game 3
June 17, 2013, 9:30 pm
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The Blackhawks' Corey Crawford denies Daniel Paille in the first period.

(AP Photo)

BOSTON – Here are five thoughts from the first period with the Bruins and Chicago Blackhawks locked in a scoreless tie after the first 20 minutes of Game 3 of the Stanley Cup Final Monday night at TD Garden:

1) Two shots, two hits and one minor penalty for roughing up Andrew Shaw for Shawn Thornton in 2:43 of ice time. That is a guy that clearly wants to play, and is trying to show it every time he’s on the ice.

2) According to Hockey Night in Canada’s Glenn Healy, Zdeno Chara needed a few stitches to the back of his head after he collided with Milan Lucic in pregame warm-ups. He was in the B’s lineup and appeared no worse for the wear, but he did also appear to be having some skate issues as the period was going on that forced him to make multiple trips to the dressing room. At one point Chara finished a penalty-killing shift, and then swung his long legs behind the bench so the Bruins equipment guys could adjust his skates.

3) The Chicago Blackhawks are 0-for-2 on the power play, and the Bruins penalty kill has snuffed out 24 consecutive power plays dating back to the New York Rangers series in the second round of the playoffs.

4) The Bruins won 17-of-22 face-offs in the period, and Patrice Bergeron won 10-of-11 as the Black and Gold continue to dominate in the face-off dot. Even Mr. Selke himself, Jonathan Toews, has lost 4-of-6 draws in the opening 20 minutes, and that’s allowed the Bruins to help control the pace of the game.

5) Brad Marchand and the Bruins had a series of wonderful offensive chances, but couldn’t finish any of them. He had perhaps the best one coming off a successful PK where Zdeno Chara found him for a long, bouncing stretch pass, but Marchand lost the puck when he went to his backhand attempt. He then went to the bench and splintered his stick over the boards in frustration. He did the same thing in Chicago when an uncalled slash ruined a breakaway chance for him. Speaking of non-calls, there were more than a few of those in the opening 20 minutes that the Bruins could have easily earned.