Corvo wants to stay out of the press box

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Corvo wants to stay out of the press box

BOSTON -- Joe Corvo doesn't like the press box.

Why would he? He's not a reporter. He's a defenseman.

Problem for him is, he's a defenseman on a Boston Bruins team that added two more defensemen at the trade deadline. So now, there's competition.

Before Thursday, Corvo had been on the losing end of that competition for six straight games. He watched from the exact place where no hockey player wants to be: the press box.

But Corvo returned to the Bruins lineup on Thursday night against a desperate Washington Capitals team, mainly because Dennis Seidenberg was scratched with an infected wound.

"It felt good," said Corvo after Thursday night's 3-2 shootout loss to the Capitals. "Nobody likes to not contribute to the team.

"It felt good to be a part of the team again, in a game situation."

Corvo played 20 minutes in his first game back, and was not on the ice for any goal. Offensively, it's not great, but it's not the worst thing. But defensively, it's something that he's been trying to do more of. He's trying to become a more defensive player.

"I'm just trying to battler harder, just boxing guys out," said Corvo. "Just, battles in the corner, one-on-one. I'm just trying to get better at that."

Corvo is what you'd like to call a "puck-moving" defenseman, otherwise known as an offensive defenseman. Defense isn't his best quality, which is why he watched the previous six games on the same floor as the reporters.

But it was up in that press box, where Corvo believes his mindset changed.

"I think the game shrinks down for ya," he said. "You tend to focus a lot more on each shift, and actually, I guess end up playing a little better, a little tighter.

"That's what I felt on Thursday night. I felt like my head was in the game the whole time, because you don't want to give anybody a reason to take you out of the lineup, when you get a chance."

And you could tell. Corvo was bearing down on one-on-one battles as wingers attempted to go wide on him. His focus was to stay with the play. Don't get beat. Keep it simple.

"I didn't see any glaring mistakes that would point the finger in his direction," said Bruins coach Claude Julien after the loss. "To me, he's still a decent puck-moving defenseman. So I certainly wouldn't qualify him as a bad player tonight."

Maybe it was execution. Or maybe it was just hunger. Either way, with Adam McQuaid's injury status uncertain as of Thursday night, it seems that Corvo could get several more shots to prove he belongs on the ice, not in the press box.

"You just show up and do your job every day," said Corvo. "I don't know what else I can say. You prepare to be in the lineup every day. I don't come to the rink, warm up, and think that I'm not playing. You have to prepare yourself, in case something happens last-minute. So, just keep doing the same things, and see what happens."

Trump wishes Kraft good luck, says Brady called to congratulate him

Trump wishes Kraft good luck, says Brady called to congratulate him

President-elect Donald Trump made sure to thank a few of his supporters from New England -- particularly those at 1 Patriot Place -- during a speech on the eve of his inauguration to the nation's highest office. 

Patriots chairman and CEO Robert Kraft, coach Bill Belichick and quarterback Tom Brady all earned shout-outs from Trump. Kraft was one of many Trump donors present for a dinner at Washington, DC's Union Station, where he was singled out by the soon-to-be-president. 

"In the audience we have somebody that's under no pressure whatsoever because he's got a great quarterback named Tom Brady and a great coach named Belichick: Bob Kraft," Trump said. "Good luck, Bob.

"Your friend Tom Brady just called. He feels good. He called to congratulate us. He feels good. Good luck. You're going to do great."

Trump gave one extra nod to Belichick, who he says taught him to out-work his competition. 

"I out-worked everybody," Trump said. "I think I out-worked anyone who ever ran for office. I learned that from Belichick."