Canadiens say Bruins don't play dirty

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Canadiens say Bruins don't play dirty

The Vancouver Sun used an image of Brad Marchand as a rat in today's paper that can now be found on their website. It's clear how that part of North America feels about Marchand and the Bruins. But is that the sentiment in other cities?

Sure, the Bruins are tough and unmerciful when it comes to doling out physical punishment on the ice. But how does one determine then if the Bruins have stepped over the line between "physical" and "dirty" territory?

How about asking the Bruins sworn hockey enemies since the dawn of NHL history?

With the Montreal Canadiens in town, CSNNE.com asked a group of Habs players whether they felt that the Bruins were considered an honest and clean team, or if the accusations of dirty play were in fact accurate.

(Warning: The answers may shock and surprise you. Readers may actually find themselves growing to like Canadiens players.)

Canadiens defenseman and vocal leader Josh Gorges looked shocked when asked if he considered the Bruins a dirty team.

I dont think the Bruins are a team where you saw coming in 'Ive got to have my head up here because theyre going to do something dirty,' " said Gorges. Its a physical team. They play hard. They hit. Do they cross a line? I dont know. I think they play physical. Hockey is a physical game. Do they get suspensions? Of course they have, but you could say the same thing about 29 other teams in the league.

Take Marchand's speed bag" incident from last years Finals, when he repeatedly punched Vancouver's Daniel Sedin. Marchand was given penalties for the string of undefended punches to the Canucks superstar, but that isnt something Gorges finds dirty in his book of hockey.

If you get a punch in the face after a whistle I dont think thats being dirty. Thats part of hockey. Hes going to get a penalty and maybe you throw one back and get a penalty too. I dont think thats dirty hockey. I think its part of the aggression of playing hockey and thats what makes our sport great -- the physicality part of it. I love that part of the game.

Surely Bruins Public Enemy No. 1 P.K. Subban would be licking at his chops to throw both Marchand and the rest of the Bruins under the bus after the run-ins theyve had over the last two years.

Right . . . right?

The Habs defenseman said he respects the Bs for the way they play the game despite their frequent skirmishes during the season and postseason.

You dont ever want to see players get suspended. Marchand is a great player and a big part of their team, said Subban. We need to focus on whoever is in the lineup. Whether its Marchand or Benoit Pouliot on that first line we just need to be ready to play.

The Bruins are in your face. You know what I mean? Theyve had a lot of success over the years. Theyre Stanley Cup champions. Theyre playing some good hockey this year. Whatever theyre doing, theyre doing something right. Whenever you play them you know theyll get in your face, theyll finish their checks and theyre gonna work hard. For our team coming into this building its going to be the work ethic thats going to let us have success here, and nothing else.

Habs defenseman Hal Gill is in a unique position, having played for both Montreal and Boston. The veteran blueliner said the Bruins merely plays the kind of game they've played for 40 years without crossing the line that would be considered cheap or dirty.

Theyre a physical team and they like to intimidate and come in with force. Its not about who's tougher. Its about going to the dirty areas and getting the job done. The Bruins have always been a big and imposing team. Theyre big and theyre strong, said Gill. They toe that line. Thats part of their modus operandi.

Form their lips to Vancouver's ears. The Habs opinions prior to their Thursday clash with the Bruins speak volumes.

Julien sidesteps job security question with "shock journalism" comment

Julien sidesteps job security question with "shock journalism" comment

BOSTON -- With three crushing losses in a row at a time when results are really all that matters, the Boston Bruins are reeling at the wrong time during the regular season. The B’s tried their best to win a game 0-0 with strong defense against a sleepy Chicago Blackhawks bunch on Friday night, but ultimately coughed up a Marian Hossa goal in the final minutes for a 1-0 regulation loss at TD Garden.

The defeat continued a swirl downward for the Black and Gold over the last week, and was a second straight shutout loss on home ice for the first time in almost 15 years. The losing stretch has also kicked up the chatter that Claude Julien is in trouble as head coach of the Bruins, and the hockey club’s underperformance up and down the lineup is ultimately going to cost the NHL’s longest tenured bench boss his job.

The Ottawa Senators have passed the Bruins in the Atlantic Division, and it’s only a matter of time before the Toronto Maple Leafs move by them as well with both Toronto and Ottawa holding six games in hand on Boston. Combine all of this with the B’s having missed the playoffs in each of the previous two seasons leading into this one, and it shouldn’t be at all surprising that Julien is squarely on the coaching hot seat.

The B’s bench boss was asked about his job security after the Chicago loss, and clearly didn’t appreciate the tough, but appropriate question.

“Well, I’m not into shock-journalism,” said Julien in a prideful tone. “So I’ll stay away from that question if you don’t mind.”

The Bruins posted their Saturday schedule shortly after Julien and the B’s players had addressed the media following the loss, and sure enough the embattled coach is scheduled to address the media post-practice as part of the regular practice day routine. So it doesn’t seem that a move with Julien is imminent this weekend despite another loss, but both the coach and the players know something is going to happen to shake things up with this team if they continue to struggle.

“Right now it’s a results based situation, so if you’re going to keep losing games then probably something’s going to happen,” said Torey Krug. “But right now we’re just pretty down emotionally after this game, so I don’t want to look at the big picture. I just [want to] focus on what’s going on in this room, and hopefully we can come back with a good effort the next game.”

A good effort might help Julien’s standing with the Bruins in the short term, but it’s impossible to imagine the B’s bench boss making it through the rest of the Bruins regular season given all of things working against him right now.