B's owner Jacobs throws support behind Thomas

650732.jpg

B's owner Jacobs throws support behind Thomas

OTTAWA The only country that hadnt been heard from on the Tim ThomasWhite House situation was the most important one when it comes to all the comings and going of the Boston Bruins, and now hes been heard from as well. Bruins principal owner Jeremy Jacobs stopped for a few moments to speak with reporters after the NHL Board of Governors Meetings at the Fairmont Chateau Laurier, and threw his full weight behind his star goaltender.

There was some uneasiness and disappointment in Thomas decision in the immediate aftermath of his decision to skip the White House ceremony with President Barack Obama due to the goalies political beliefs. Jacobs seemed fully over it nearly a week later, and toed the same party line as just about everyone else in the Bruins organization: as long as Thomas is stopping pucks better than any other player on the planet his personal politics wont be an issue.

Tim is a great hockey player. Hes done his job very well for us and Im totally behind him as a great hockey player, said Jacobs. I dont necessarily agree with his political view, but that isnt what he does for me. Ive got to say this: while I dont agree with it he certainly has the right to express himself as every American does. He does a good job.

The NHLs Chairman of the Board of Governors was further asked if Thomas absence cast any sort of pall over a day celebrating the collective team accomplishment, and unflinchingly rejected that notion as well.

You guys in the media say things to me that I dont like. But I definitely believe you have the right to say them, said Jacobs. I fight for that and I fight for his right to do what he wants to do. He expressed it. Thats all. Its over unless you guys in the media want to perpetuate it.

It didnt sound anything like the actions of an irate owner ready to ship away their goaltender in a fit of pique, or somebody in a place of power attempting to grease the skids for a player on the way out. Instead Jacobs was standing behind the player who is perhaps singlehandedly responsible for bringing the Stanley Cup back to Boston, and in doing so probably won himself even a few more supporters back in Black and Gold country.

First impressions from Red Sox' 8-3 win over Rockies

red_sox_ortiz_betts_052416.jpg

First impressions from Red Sox' 8-3 win over Rockies

First impressions from the Red Sox' 8-3 win over the Colorado Rockies:

 

The Red Sox continue to use Fenway as their own little offensive playground.

Since April 20, the Red Sox are averaging exactly eight runs per game at home. That's just over a month of the covering 18 games.

They've also collected 10 or more hits in 16 of those 18 games, utilizing every bit of the field.

For the last two seasons, Fenway stopped being a tough place to play for opponents. But at home this year, the Sox have outscored opponents by 67 runs.

 

All of a sudden, the Red Sox are a triples team and Fenway is a triples haven.

A triple by Christian Vazquez - of all people -- gave the Red Sox a league-high 13 triples this season.

Fenway has a reputation for being a doubles park, but the ballpark has been home to 12 triples in 26 games - five by visiting teams and seven by the Red Sox. That translates into almost one every two games.

 

David Price was solid, but not spectacular.

The positives: Price got through the seventh inning for the fifth time this season. He walked just one and fanned six in seven innings.

He was hit hard a few times, with a homer into the visitor's bullpen allowed to Charlie Blackmon and a triple to the triangle for Carlos Gonzalez.

Consider it another step forward for Price, but it fell far short of dominant.

 

Koji Uehara's deception is heightened against teams that don't see him much.

Uehara allowed a leadoff single to D.J. LeMahieu, but then fanned three in a row, finishing each hitter off with his trademark split-finger fastball.

That pitch can be tough to recognize for hitters who see it a few times per season. For those in the National League who are largely unfamiliar with Uehara's splitter, it's apparently some sort of Kryptonite.