Bruins not giving up on finding puck-moving defensemen

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Bruins not giving up on finding puck-moving defensemen

If this weeks development camp for the Bruins brought one thing to light, its the never-ending search for the mythic puck-moving defenseman.

The Bruins have a well-chronicled history of searching for a puck-moving partner to pair with Zdeno Charas tower of defensive power, but they havent found their permanent Mr. Right since Peter Chiarelli took over the Bs reins six seasons ago.

First there was Dennis Wideman, who had a 50-point season in Boston before subpar skating skills and ill-timed turnovers sent him on his way.

Matt Hunwick developed within the Bruins system, but ultimately didnt have the skills necessary to be that defenseman.

Steve Kampfer similarly rose up through Bostons ranks, but didnt prove to be answer while coming down with injuries at the worst possible times.

There was, of course, Tomas Kaberle as well. The Bruins won a Cup with Kaberle after he arrived from Toronto, but he essentially became a third pairing defenseman during the playoffs that quarterbacked the worst power play in history to ever actually win a Cup.

Obviously weve tried to develop a puck-mover a little bit in the last few years, or bring in a player of that ilk," said Bruins assistant GM Don Sweeney. "People would comment that Kaberle wasnt a great fit, but he helped us win a Stanley Cup. I dont care what anybody says. He played with Adam McQuaid and he helped out McQuaid in terms of transitioning the puck and making sure we werent in our own end. Those were key ingredients.

Everything about Kaberles usefulness is ultimately debatable, but nobody can argue with Sweeneys point that the Bruins won it all despite the flaws of the current Montreal Canadiens blueliner.

Finally last season Joe Corvo was a one-and-out after playing like he was actively trying to relocate into Claude Juliens dog house. The Bruins attempted to protect Corvo by keeping him away from the oppositions best offensive players, but once again he couldnt offset his defensive foibles with enough offensive production.

After seeing gun-for-hire defensemen and traded assets ultimately crash and burn as Bostons puck-moving defenseman, it appears they are finally turning inward as an organization for solutions.

And theyre not doing it with just one candidate.

Nineteen year-old Dougie Hamilton holds the inside track for the sixth defenseman spot on the Bruins heading into next year, and his 95 point season (regular season and playoffs combined) at the junior hockey level show offensive proficiency. While Hamilton is a more well-rounded defensemen than puck-movingpower play specialist, Sweeney believes he might grow into an elite offensive defenseman.

You look at what Doug Hamilton may or may not be able to bring and what he was able to do at the junior level. You hope that his offensive skills translate and that hes gonna be a puck mover, said Sweeney. Is he a prototypical guy . . . sometimes you describe those guys as being small and skilled wise? No, those guys are big and skilled now. Its the best of both worlds in that regard.

Torey Krug's another potential candidate . . . you know, he came in and moved the puck in the couple of games that he played very effectively. Im sure the guys in Providence would say the same thing about David Warsofsky. Clearly were trying to make sure that we have that part of it covered because we feel like its a need. If we can do something better at the NHL level, then we need to go out and develop it.

Thats exactly what theyre doing: David Warsofsky and Torey Krug will both be in Bruins training camp as young defensemen with puck-moving skills and fast-paced skating on their resume. They are in the latest in a line of candidates to fill Bostons vacancy for a PMD (puck-moving defenseman) and Krug showed some promise in a pair of dress rehearsal games with the Bruins at the end of last season.

Then theres 18-year-old Charlestown, Mass native Matt Grzelcyk, who showed perhaps the best skating wheels of any player in the entire Bruins Development Camp this week after the Bruins secured his rights in the third round of the draft. Grizz showed the aggressive willingness to jump up into the play offensively against players older, bigger and stronger than him in first development camp, and fearlessly flashed 360 degree spin moves when looking for a little offensive separation.

The future Boston University star is likely four or five years away from playing in a Bruins uniform if things go well in Jack Parkers hockey program. But Grzelcyk is a future PMD the Bruins will keep tabs on over his collegiate career while they also try out a few new candidates for the position in the meantime.

It certainly beats the alternative.

It is expensive to acquire that puck-moving defenseman as it would be to sign a player; Dennis Widemans contract is what it is, said Sweeney. Ideally, youd like to develop that, and you would be homegrown in every position. We look for the puck-moving defenseman, of course.

Youre not going to be able to force that. Even looking at this years draft, you know, would you go up and trade for a player? That player might not be there, and might not be ready for two or three years.

So instead the first new wave of puck-moving defensemen candidates will include Krug, Warsofsky and Hamilton this coming season. Eventually one would expect the law of averages will begin working on their favor, and one of Bostons undersized, skilled choices will develop into a Bryan Rafalski-type blueliner.

But until then the search for the elusive, mythic PMD rages on for the Bruins and they'll will keep on trying until they find what they're looking for.

Marchand: 'No place I'd rather play' than Boston

Marchand: 'No place I'd rather play' than Boston

The Bruins made it official on Monday -- mere minutes after the news had broken -- as they clearly couldn’t wait to announce an eight year, $49 million contract extension for Brad Marchand. who is finishing up his Team Canada gig at the World Cup of Hockey.

PROFILE: Joe Haggerty's preseason look at Brad Marchand

The deal averages $6.125 million per season, broken up between actual salary and signing bonus money. The Bruins were most definitely given a hometown discount by an elite player who snapped home a career-high 37 goals and 60 points last season, the most goals scored by a Bruins player since Glenn Murray in 2002-03. And everybody knows goal scorers get paid in the NHL, even if Marchand won’t be expected to score quite that many every year.

Marchand, 28, has also been the second-leading scorer in the entire World Cup of Hockey tournament, behind only Sidney Crosby, and continues to raise his profile in the NHL world beyond his customary agitator role. The “Nose Face Killah” could have waited for until free agency if he'd wanted to pick up every last nickel on the table, but it’s very clear he’s invested in the team that drafted and developed him, and with which he won a Cup five years ago.

"This is an extremely exciting day for me and my family," said Marchand, who now has a full no-move clause for the first five years of his next contract. "I would like to thank the Jacobs family, [president] Cam Neely, [general manager] Don Sweeney, [coach] Claude Julien, the coaching staff, my teammates and our fans for their continued support and belief in me. I have been a Bruin since the start of my pro career and there is no place I would rather play. I look forward to doing everything I can to help our team achieve success and bring the Stanley Cup back to Boston."

Marchand has been among the team’s leading scorers since joining the league in 2010-11, has been the NHL’s most dangerous penalty killer over the last five years, and pairs with Patrice Bergeron to anchor the top line. He’s also become much more of a leader in the last few seasons as other character veterans have been peeled away from the core group, and a hometown discount proves it one of the most meaningful ways possible.

It was clear Marchand was invested in the Bruins when he helped recruit free agent David Backes with phone calls this summer, and he was also present for the recruiting pitch to Jimmy Vesey at Warrior Ice Arena last month.

The Bruins players at training camp were happy to hear No. 63 was going to be in Boston for the long haul.

“Marchy is Marchy. I think everybody kind of knows what that means,” said Kevan Miller. “He’s been great for our organization and great for the fans and for this city. He’s been all in since Day One, and he’s been a guy that I looked up to.”

While the Bruins have confirmed the contract, Sweeney won't weigh in until later today. But one would expect there will be an appreciation for the skill of the player, and Marchand’s commitment to the organization after accepting less than he could have gotten on the open market.

Monday, Sept. 26: So what happens if Canada loses World Cup final?

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Monday, Sept. 26: So what happens if Canada loses World Cup final?

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while finding it hard to believe that it’s game day for the Boston Bruins. Summer is officially O-V-A.
 
-- The Montreal media is starting to get on board with this tougher, grittier version of the Habs, along with a healthy Carey Price.
 
-- Pierre McGuire sits in with Ottawa’s TSN sports radio station and talks Team Europe in the World Cup, as well as a number of other things.

-- FOH (Friend of Haggs) Mike Zeisberger is already openly wondering what would happen in Canada if they lose to Team Europe in the best-of-three final to the World Cup.

-- FOH (Friend of Haggs) Puck Daddy Greg Wyshynski asks Brad Marchand if a part of him has thought about playing with Sidney Crosby on the Penguins if he hits free agency. Bells, alarms and whistles should be going off on Causeway Street to give No. 63 whatever he wants at this point. In case you missed it, I talked about the danger of Crosby trying to woo his Nova Scotian buddy to Pittsburgh last week.
 
-- PHT writer James O’Brien says it sounds like the St. Louis Blues are going to play a more aggressive brand of hockey this season.
 
-- For something completely different: Forbes Magazine says Pete Carroll, not Bill Belichick, should be considered the NFL’s foremost cheater.