Bruins close out Cup party with White House visit


Bruins close out Cup party with White House visit

WASHINGTON, D.C. Aside from Tim Thomas decision to use the afternoon as a political bully pulpit, the Bruins had a presidentially good time during a Monday afternoon visit to the White House as reigning Stanley Cup champs. The players, coaches, management, ownership and training staff aside from Thomas as the lone absentee from this years team and Michael Ryder due to commitments with the Dallas Stars took in a 45-minute private tour of the presidential home on Pennsylvania Ave. before standing on the stage as the guests of presidential honor in the East Wing.

There have been so many good memories from winning the Cup, but a chance to come to the White House is definitely up there, said Patrice Bergeron. I never thought Id be able to do that. Now Im here. Were all here and we all met the President together just like we all won the Cup together. It was special being able to do that today.

President Barack Obama spoke for a few minutes and covered all the bases with a speech tailored around the Black and Gold just one day before his State of the Union Address: he cracked a joke about the Bs drinking exploits after racking up the gigantic bill tab from Foxwoods last summer, dropped a Brad Marchand nickname into the proceedings with the under-utilized Little Ball of Hate and made reference to the thorough domination of the Boston sports scene.

Last year, this team endured a long season, and an even longer playoff. They are the first team in NHLhistory to win three full seven-game series," said Obama amid a throng of photographers, reporters and onlookers including Boston Mayor Tom Menino and Massachusetts Senator John Kerry in the East Wing audience. "They had some pretty long playoff beards to show for it. I appreciate them looking a little more clean-cut as they come here today.

"Brad Marchand went into the season on the fourth line, but the Little Ball of Hate shrugged off the rookie jitters -- what's up with that nickname, man?" Obama asked before turning to a red-faced Marchand being nudged on by Zdeno Chara, "and scored five goals in the last five games of the final series.

A couple of other greatest hits from the Obama speech that included references to Marchand, Nathan Horton, Thomas, Mark Recchi and Zdeno Chara:

Nathan Horton went down hard in Game 3 of the Finals but that didnt stop him from doing everything he could to help them win. He even brought some Boston water all the way to Vancouver and poured it on the ice before the decisive Game 7 . . . so Beantown delivered.

There is no better image of the Bruins dominance than the tallest player in NHL history. Ill let you guess which one that is. Zdeno Chara hoisted the Cup high above the ice in Vancouver and Im sure thats the highest that the Stanley Cup has ever been. This Stanley Cup was won as much by defense as it was by offense and Tim Thomas posted two shutouts in the Stanley Cup Finals. He set an all-time record for saves in the postseason and he also had the honor of being only the second American to ever be recognized as the Stanley Cup playoffs MVP.

They overcame injuries and they overcame long odds. The wise old man of the team Mark Recchi summed up the season by saying, We played together, we drank together." Obama couldnt resist asking Well, how much did you drink? before going back to the Rex quote "we lost together and we never wavered.

Obama also gave some love for the Boston Bruins Foundation that raised over 7 million in its charitable endeavors over the years since its inception, and got some well-rounded applause.

It was nearly a perfect turn for the Bruins on an off-day in the nations capital between a Sunday shootout win over the Flyers and a Tuesday night tilt against the Washington Capitals finishing out the pre-All-Star break portion of the schedule. Marchand was genuinely flattered at the attention he received from the Commander in Chief, and many of the Bruins from the Slovakian captain to the Quebecois heart and soul leader of the team appreciated how unique the White House experience turned out to be.

That doesnt happen everyday . . . to have the President single you out. Its a cool thing to have happened, said Marchand. I definitely didnt expect it, but it was very enjoyable and something Ill always remember. They all saw Obama looking around for me and Zee was pretty quick to give me a shove toward him.

It was a little embarrassing at the time, but it was cool. The boys have been all over me because I got a little red-faced especially being there in the front row. Its all in good fun.

Aside from Marchand again providing some comic relief to the formal setting, the January stop at the White House with the Cup in tow also finally, officially closes the book on last years accomplishments. Several times the Bruins have said this is the last time theyll be in the same room with the Cup unless they win it again.

But this is truly the case after visiting with Obama.


Theyre sure of it.

This actually is the conclusion of our Stanley Cup celebration. While this is great, its also the end, said Chiarelli. We all see the history in this place. I really liked the President. He seems very down to earth. He talked to a bunch of us in the receiving line and he seems like a guy that genuinely loves sports. He just seems like a good guy.

With another once-in-a-lifetime experience now behind them after spending the day relaxing with Obama in the presidents house, the Bruins will move on to the business of being humble hockey players again on Tuesday.

Butler imitates Brown with post-interception dance: 'Nothing personal'


Butler imitates Brown with post-interception dance: 'Nothing personal'

Malcolm Butler didn't mean any disrespect. After all, imitation is the sincerest form of flattery. 


When the Patriots corner picked off a Landry Jones pass in the first quarter -- one that was intended for receiver Antonio Brown -- Butler stood up in the end zone, faced the Heinz Field crowd, stuck one arm in the air But and gyrated like someone had attached jumper cables to his facemask. 

He was doing his best to mimick one of Brown's well-known touchdown dances.

"Me and Brown had conversation before," Butler said, "and it was a joke to him once I showed him how I do it. Much love for that guy. Nothing personal."

For Butler, it was the highlight of what was a productive afternoon. The third-year corner was asked to shadow Brown for much of the day, and he held Brown to five catches on nine targets for 94 yards. He also broke up a pair of passes intended for Brown's teammates.

“Stopping Antonio Brown, that’s impossible," Butler said. "You can’t stop him. You can only slow him down. I just went out there and tried to compete today . . . Great players are going to make plays but you have to match their intensity.”
Even on the longest throw from backup quarterback Landry Jones to Brown, a 51-yarder, it appeared as though Butler played the coverage called correctly. 

Butler lined up across from Brown and trailed him underneath as Brown worked his way from the left side of the field to the right. Butler was looking for some help over the top in that scenario, seemingly, but because Brown ran across the formation, it was hard for the back end of the defense to figure out who would be helping Butler. 

Coach Bill Belichick admitted as much after the game. 

"He was on [Brown] a lot the way we set it up," Belichick said. "Look, they've got great players. They're tough to cover. They hit us on a couple over routes, in cut where they kind of ran away from the coverage that we had. 

"The plays were well designed. Good scheme, good thorws and obviously good routes by Brown. They got us on a couple, but I thought we competed hard. We battled all the way. We battled on third down. We battled in the red area. They made some. We made some, but they're good. They have a lot of good players."

And Brown, in particular, is about as close as it gets to unstoppable in the NFL. Butler found that out in Week 1 of last year when he matched up with Brown in his first game as a starter, giving up 9 catches for 133 yards to the All-Pro wideout. 

Though Sunday might not have been perfect for Butler, it was better than that day about 14 months ago. And at times, it was worth dancing about. 

SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL: Seahawks, Cardinals miss OT FGs, tie 6-6


SUNDAY NIGHT FOOTBALL: Seahawks, Cardinals miss OT FGs, tie 6-6

GLENDALE, Ariz. (AP) Seattle's Stephen Hauschka and Arizona's Chandler Catanzaro missed short field goals that would have won the game in overtime and the Seahawks and Cardinals settled for a 6-6 tie Sunday night.

Hauschka's 27-yard field goal was wide left with seven seconds left after Catanzaro's 24-yarder bounced off the left upright.

The tie was the Cardinals' first since Dec. 7, 1986, a 10-10 draw at Philadelphia when the franchise was based in St. Louis. It was the first for the Seattle since entering the NFL in 1976.

Click here for the complete story