Bourque ready to carry on family legacy with P-Bruins

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Bourque ready to carry on family legacy with P-Bruins

PROVIDENCE Chris Bourque returns to the New England hockey scene a very different guy.

The 26-year-old Bourque was a college hockey phenom at Boston University when he bolted the Comm. Ave campus after one year to sign with the Caps and begin his professional hockey career. The 5-foot-8 playmaker was confident as a teenager that grew up as hockey royalty on the North Shore as the oldest son of a Boston Bruins Hall of Fame defenseman, and probably unaware of how difficult it would be for him to secure a full-time NHL job.

Like so many people in life, Bourque has gained wisdom as experience and time have taught him things about both himself and the game he loves so very much.

Im definitely older and more mature, for sure, said Bourque. Ive grown a lot as a player and as a person in all aspects. Hopefully that will get me to the next level when in my younger years I might not have been mature enough to handle the next level.

To get to the NHL you need to be on top of your game every night and be consistent. I think Ive learned that. I pretty much grew up in the Bruins locker room when my dad was playing here. Playing pro hockey was always my big dream and playing for the Boston Bruins was the other dream. To get a chance to do that is special for me. Ive dreamt about pulling that Bruins sweater over my head.

It seems like an almost perfect fit that Bourque comes back to the Boston area entering the prime of his hockey career, and will start his auditioning process for a job with the Bruins by starring for the Providence Bs instead.

Bourque should get his look if theres an abbreviated NHL training camp in November or December along with a handful of other Boston roster hopefuls.

But it's nose to the AHL grindstone until then, and Bourque proved last year he could handle that adeptly with 93 points for the AHL Hershey Bears. Bourque will electrify the power play, and showed in just one preseason game that his passing vision and quick decision-making will lead to buckets of points for the Bs.

But theres also the leadership component hes looking to play with skilled youngsters like Jared Knight, Carter Camper and Ryan Spooner, and the Bruins found themselves a very good player for the price of another (Zach Hamill) that had run his course in the Bs organization.

Im more excited about teaching the young players things about becoming a pro that other guys helped me out with. Now its time for me to play the other role and put them on the right path, said Bourque, who harkened back to his days as a teenager navigating through pro hockey. Being away from home for the first time was tough. I played at prep school and at BU in the Boston area, so it was all in the area.

The time away from the rink was the toughest part. Being on your own and little things like doing your own laundry, doing your dishes, cooking for yourselfthose are all new to these guys after they were living with billets in juniors. Taking care of yourself and basically becoming a man is a little eye-opening when youre doing it for the first time.

He would have competed for the open third line role in Boston with Jordan Caron, Ryan Spooner and Jared Knight if there had been a normal NHL camp, and he knows its still a winnable competition if he can show his matured game in Providence starting tonight against the Manchester Monarchs. Its AHL opening night across North America and a watershed moment for so many young players in their pro hockey debuts.

But Bourque has other things in mind while the AHL ranks as the only pro hockey game in town with the Bs locked out for the time being.

The AHL season is starting today and its something weve all been looking forward to, said Bourque. We need to focus on playing hockey games for Providence and let everything else take of itself. Hopefully a few of us get the call to Boston when the NHL gets going and challenge for a roster spot.

It will be in the back of my mind, Im sure, but itll be all about focusing on the action down here.

Bourque has been unable to win a permanent NHL gig in either Washington or Pittsburgh during stints for both Eastern Conference teams, and those were learning experiences as well. The Bruins brass many of whom played long years with Ray Bourque and have known Chris since he was newborn baby think Boston will be the place for a highly skilled player that was seemingly born to play for the Black and Gold.

Theres a soft spot for me, obviously, said Bs assistant general manager Don Sweeney. Ive know Chris since he was born. Ive watched him play on other teams and Ive seen the success that hes had. I welcomed him here to help some of our other guys be in a pressure environment and then rise to that NHL level. Because I know thats what he covets.

Hes as competitive as any of these other guys, if not more so. His hockey IQ is off the charts. Were excited to have him. Hes the only one that can tell you if hes received bona fide chances at other places, but I think hes learned that hes going to need to play different roles. He knows if hes up with Boston he wont necessarily be on the power play. He might have to kill penalties and be an energy guy, and hes in a better position to handle that. Were also in a spot with the lockout where the Bruins coaching staff can get a good look at him, maybe see that he can play some of those other roles as well.

So whats the best part about being home for Chris in the Massachusetts area where he grew up?

The perfect example was last weekend. We had an off day on Sunday and I was able to go home and watch the Patriots game with my family, said Bourque. Im not far from home, so its great for my wife and my baby to have my grandparents so close by in the area.

You can take the boy out of Boston, but you cant the Boston sports out of the boys blood no matter what you do.

Thursday, July 28: Will the Bruins end up with Jimmy Vesey?

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Thursday, July 28: Will the Bruins end up with Jimmy Vesey?

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading after a pretty amazing, on-point succession of speeches by Joe Biden, Michael Bloomberg and Barack Obama at the Democratic National Convention last night. It was quite a contrast to the absolute circus sideshow that went on in Cleveland last week.

*FOH (Friend of Haggs) Greg Wyshynksi chronicles the Jimmy Vesey Sweepstakes, and the late entry of the Chicago Blackhawks as a suitor. Wysh still feels, as I do, that the Bruins end up getting this talented player at the end of the day.

*The details of the charges levied against Evander Kane paint an ugly picture of a hockey player doing a lot of the wrong things.

*PHT writer Mike Halford says that the Carolina Hurricanes might be ready to snap their playoff drought after extending head coach Bill Peters.

*John Tavares tells the Toronto media not to count on him ever pulling over a Maple Leafs jersey amid post-Stamkos speculation.

*Well, would you look at this? The Nashville Predators are providing salary cap and contract info on their own team website. What a concept!

*The Edmonton Oilers say they will have a new captain in place by opening night, and it will be interesting to see if they go the Connor McDavid route.

*Brian Elliott is thrilled at the opportunity to be “the man” between the pipes for the Calgary Flames this season after splitting time in St. Louis.

*For something completely different: a great feature on Howard Stern, and his transformation from shock jock to master interviewer.

Joe Haggerty can be followed on Twitter: @HacksWithHaggs

Bergeron and Marchand convinced Backes to join Bruins

Bergeron and Marchand convinced Backes to join Bruins

JAMAICA PLAIN -- For those excited about the idea of an intense, hard-hitting David Backes in a Bruins uniform for the next five years, you have Patrice Bergeron and Brad Marchand to partially thank.

Backes, 32, didn’t know either of them all that well prior to this summer, aside from his experiences on ice against them. But Bergeron and Marchand called Backes multiple times while recruiting him to Boston, and it was a major factor in the former Blues captain signing a five-year, $30 million deal with the B's.

“Being an outsider, we need to have a little bit of confession here that Marchand is the kind of guy that gets under everybody’s skin. I was no different,” said the 6-foot-3, 221-pound Backes, who has 206 goals and 460 points in 727 career NHL games, all with St. Louis. “But then talking to him a little bit in the interview process prior to July 1, I hung up the phone and had to take a deep breath and say to myself, ‘That little disturber, he’s actually a pretty good guy.’ Those guys end up being the best teammates.

“A guy like Bergeron, when you play against him [he's] always in the right spot, and is never making mistakes. Those types of guys, again, are guys you want on your team, and guys you want to go to war with. They’re All-World players, Bergeron is an All-World player. But he’s also a down-to-earth guy that puts his work boots on, takes his lunch pail and plays his butt off. He’s nice to the young kids, and he’s nurturing in helping them come along. I think you’ve seen in the NHL that you need a few guys on entry-level deals, or a few guys to outperform their contracts, in order to have success in the salary-cap era. That nurturing and mentorship can really foster those kinds of performances.”

While Backes went on to mention Zdeno Chara as another highly respected, formidable opponent with whom he’ll now share a dressing room, it was interesting to note that players who currently have letters on their sweaters, like Chara and David Krejci, didn’t play a part in the recruiting process. Instead it was the next captain of the team (Bergeron) and a player (Marchand) currently in the middle of negotiations entering the last year of his contract.

“I talked to both Bergeron and Marchand twice before July 1," said Backes. "Just the way that they spoke about their team mentality, and teaming up together and sharing the load of hard minutes that need to be played, and also sharing the load of the offensive necessities that a team has . . . those things just rang true to my beliefs of a team.

“You’re all equals whether you’re the top-paid guy, or the top-minute guy, or the low-minute guy, or the guy that’s playing every other game because you’re the healthy scratch in the other games.

“We all needed to be treated equal, and do whatever we can to support the next guy. When the next guy has success, we have to be just as happy as if we scored the goal. That’s the type of thing where, when you get that from the full 20 guys on the ice, it’s so tough to be beat. Those are the teams that win championships.”

It will be interesting to see just how much involvement Backes has with the Bergeron and Marchand combination. He could very easily be a right-wing fit with those two dynamic forwards next season, or he could be a third-line center behind Bergeron and Krejci and give the Bruins elite depth down the middle of the ice.

True to his team-oriented nature, Backes said he’ll be happy to play at either position and do whatever Claude Julien feels is best.