Behind Rondo's miraculous return

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Behind Rondo's miraculous return

By Justin Aucoin
WickedGoodSports.com

By now be you a basketball fan or not youve probably heard about Rajon Rondo dislocating his elbow after professional tool and sidekick Dwayne Wade pulled Rondo down to the parquet.

Just seeing that video gives us a cold chill up the spine. The still frame is maybe even worse.

Photo from Sports of Boston

Shudders

There was talk that Rondo wouldnt return for the rest of the series, let alone return to the game.

And yet...

What a stud.

Regardless of sport, this is the type of player Boston loves tough, competitive and gives it his all every shift. Its why Shawn Thornton is so beloved and why Teddy Bruschi was also shown much love in New England. And its a reason why Rondo is also a fan favorite.

There still remains a huge cloud around how Rondo could return and be so effective after Wade went all MMA submission hold on him. Luckily WickedGoodSports is full of former CIA agents. Heres what our crackpot team found.

First off, the Celtics medical staff brought Rondo into a secret laboratory deep within the bowels of the Boston Garden.

Then they called in the leading scientist in bionic and cybernetic technology, who they just happened to have on hand that night.

The medical staff and Dr. Inspector Gadget worked tirelessly and quickly to create an artificial arm and hand worthy of a three point throwing champ.

They woke Rondo and let him try out his new and improved arm.

He returned.

He conquered.

He is:

And hes not done yet

Highlights: Devin Booker puts up 70 points but Celtics get the win

Highlights: Devin Booker puts up 70 points but Celtics get the win

Highlights from the TD Garden as Devin Booker had a historic performance where he scored 70 points, but it wasn't enough to get the win over the Celtics.

Thomas on Suns: 'We’re worried about the playoffs; they’re worried about the lottery'

Thomas on Suns: 'We’re worried about the playoffs; they’re worried about the lottery'

BOSTON – Stacking wins on top of wins is the mindset of the Boston Celtics right now, so the players who did speak to the media following Friday’s 130-120 win over Phoenix drove that point home emphatically.

But inside the locker room, it was unusually quiet, the kind of silence you expect following a loss.

Considering how the Celtics’ defense was absolutely thrashed by Devin Booker’s franchise record 70 points, there’s no question at a minimum the Celtics’ pride overall was stung.

And when Suns coach Earl Watson began calling time-outs and having his team commit fouls at the end of the game, there’s no question it rubbed a few Celtics the wrong way.

“I don’t think anybody has ever seen that; continuing to call time-outs, continuing to foul when we are up 15. But I mean, it was obvious what they were trying to do. They were trying to get him (Booker) the most points possible. Hat off to to him (Booker. He played a hell of a game.”

Following the game, Watson defended his late-game decision making.

“Calling time-outs at the end kept the game close,” he said. “It’s basketball; I’m not coming to any arena to be liked. If people don’t like us while we build … so what? Do something about it.”

The Suns (22-51) never came any closer than 10 points, which was the final score margin.

Al Horford acknowledged that there was some aggravation following the game.

“You can be frustrated when somebody is doing that to you,” he said. “It’s not to one guy, it’s to the team so I think we’re probably more aggravated at ourselves, at least personally I feel that way. I probably could have done a little better, maybe done some different things to prevent it. We got to give him credit, 70 points, I don’t care it’s 70, he got 70. It’s impressive.”

But there will be some inside the Celtics locker room and among their fan base, who were bothered by the Suns’ late-game actions which seemed more focused on Booker getting numbers than anything else.

When asked about being disrespected by the Suns’ late-game strategy, Thomas wanted no part of that conversation.

“It is what it is,” Thomas said. “We won the game. We’re worried about the playoffs; they’re worried about the lottery.”

 Boom!