Ortiz adds to his postseason legend

Ortiz adds to his postseason legend
October 24, 2013, 3:15 am
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BOSTON - Throughout the postseason, David Ortiz has seemingly homed in on the Fenway bullpens, launching one missile after another to his target, as if on auto-pilot.
     
In the American League Championship Series, Ortiz rocketed a line drive  to right in the eighth inning, a ball hit so hard that Tigers outfielder Torii Hunter vaulted over the bullpen wall in fast pursuit.
     
In the second inning of Wednesday's Game 1 of the World Series, it seemed as if Ortiz had struck again, also with the bases loaded. But this time, with a shot more arching than linear, St. Louis Cardinals right fielder Carlos Beltran roamed back, extended his glove into the visitor's bullpen and snatched the ball back, saving a grand slam.
     
Ortiz had to be satisfied with only a sacrifice fly.
     
In the seventh inning, Ortiz got his revenge. Facing hard-throwing St. Louis reliever Kevin Siegrist, Ortiz drilled the first pitch he saw and drove it over   the home bullpen and into the bleachers.
     
No leaving this to chance. No telling what some enterprising outfielder may be plotting.
     
"I just made sure I hit a little farther,'' said Ortiz, "so nobody could jump over and catch it.''
     
Ortiz knew little about Siegrist, whom he had never faced before. Then again, there's only so much preparation necessary for that sort of confrontation.
     
"He's got a good fastball,'' said Ortiz, "and I still can hit fastballs.”
     
It was Ortiz's fourth home this post-season, and his remarkable postseason production at times leaves his teammates in awe.
     
"He's like that daddy figure,'' said Shane Victorino, "that you go out and watch every night and say, 'How does he keep doing it?' ''
     
While the homer only padded an already significant Red Sox margin of victory in the late innings, it had some personal significance for Ortiz, as it marked his 16th postseason homer, tying him for eighth-most in history and passing one Babe Ruth (15) on the all-time list.
     
Told of the milestone, Ortiz responded: "God bless me. Going to have to talk about somebody else now.''
     
Ortiz typically shrugs off some milestones, and offers that he'll be able to appreciate those sort of achievements when he retires and has time to reflect and put his career in context.
    
"I don't think about that [stuff] now,'' he said. "If I stop right now, think people are going to care about that? No. They're going to care about me coming in tomorrow and doing my thing again. You just ride the momentum. It's a moment that you're leaving right now, and one day, you're going to stop and think about it and appreciate it and everything. But right now? No.''
     
But prodded, Ortiz acknowledged Ruth is someone special.
     
"Every number in baseball,'' he said, "it seems like it's based on what Babe Ruth did back in the day.''
     
Then, considering the accomplishment, he let out a satisfied chuckle.
     
"But now,'' he said, "they're going to have somebody else to talk about.''