Yankees' pitcher injures self falling down steps

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Yankees' pitcher injures self falling down steps

From Comcast SportsNet
TAMPA, Fla. (AP) -- The New York Yankees took their first misstep of 2012 when All-Star setup man David Robertson sprained his right foot when he fell down stairs while moving boxes in his spring training home. An initial X-ray was negative, and the reliever was taken a hospital for an MRI Thursday. The accident occurred Wednesday night, and his foot started throbbing an hour or two later. He was put in a walking boot to make the foot more comfortable. Manager Joe Girardi said Robertson was limping from what he described as a mid-foot sprain that caused the pitcher to walk gingerly. "I'm concerned," Girardi said. "It hurt him to walk, (and) you assume that he's going to be down a little bit of time even if everything comes back OK. Now that doesn't mean he wouldn't have time to get ready for the season. But you've got to start over a little bit." Girardi said if Robertson were sidelined for two weeks or less, he still could be ready for the Yankees' opener at Tampa Bay on April 6. "If it's going to happen, let it happen now," he said. Robertson had been slated to make his second spring training appearance Thursday against Toronto at Dunedin. The 26-year-old was 4-0 with a 1.08 ERA in 70 games in 2011. "Last year, he did a tremendous job," Mariano Rivera said. "So we're expecting something good out of him this year, also." If Robertson isn't ready for opening day, Rafael Soriano likely would move up to New York's eighth-inning pitcher. New York has bad memories of pitchers and injured feet. Chien-Ming Wang sprained his right foot while running the bases at Houston on June 15, 2008, and missed the rest of the season. Wang struggled to a 1-6 record with a 9.64 ERA when he returned the following year. He needed shoulder surgery that sidelined him until last July, when he came back to the major leagues with the Washington Nationals. Girardi said the injury occurred when Robertson missed a step. "They were empty boxes. They weren't even heavy boxes," Girardi said. "I told him to kick them down the stairs the next time." Notes: Rivera threw 32 pitches in his second batting practice session. He likely will make his exhibition debut Sunday.

Francona, Epstein receive grand ovations at BBWAA dinner

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Francona, Epstein receive grand ovations at BBWAA dinner

BOSTON -- “I didn’t feel that love after I made a pitching change in the sixth inning,” Terry Francona said after a 45-second standing ovation from Boston fans upon receiving the MLB Manager of the Year award from the BBWAA Thursday.

It’s without question the love for Francona runs deep in the city. Why wouldn’t it? He was the leader in breaking the 86-year old curse, and wound up winning another World Series title for Boston three years later.

Actually, he was more of a co-leader, working alongside the same person who won the MLB Executive of the Year honors from the BBWAA for 2016.

Theo Epstein -- who received an ovation 17 seconds shorter than Francona, but who’s counting -- reminisced about the Red Sox ownership group that took a chance on a young kid who wasn’t necessarily the ideal candidate to take over as GM of a team, but now that’s helped him build the Chicago Cubs into a winning franchise and establish a great working environment.

This October marks 13 years since the ’04 championship, 10 years since ’07 and six years since the pair left Boston. Without question they’ve left their mark on the city and forever changed Red Sox baseball.

And while the fans showed their undying gratitude for Francona with an ovation almost as long as his acceptance speech, the Indians manager recognized the favor the current Red Sox brass has done for him.

“I’d like to thank Dave Dombrowski and the Red Sox for getting Chris Sale the hell out of the Central Division,” Francona said.