Will Bill Parcells end up coaching the Saints?

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Will Bill Parcells end up coaching the Saints?

From Comcast SportsNet
NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- Decisions are still pending on a possible appeal of Sean Payton's suspension or an interim coach should his season-long punishment be upheld, a person familiar with the situation said. The person says Payton, general manager Mickey Loomis and their staffs were in meetings at the team's suburban headquarters Thursday and focused primarily on preparations for next month's NFL draft. The person spoke to The Associated Press Thursday on condition of anonymity because the Saints have not announced their plans. "Everyone is working hard, in draft meetings, et cetera ... trying to get better," the person said. Payton's suspension in connection with the Saints' bounty scandal is slated to begin on Sunday, and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell has said he has until Monday to appeal. Payton has sought advice on the matter from his friend and retired coach Bill Parcells, who has told several media outlets he'd consider taking the Saints' interim coaching job if Payton, his protege, asked him to take over. "I had plenty of opportunities to do things with different teams, and I've turned them all down," Parcells, who turns 71 in August, told the New York Daily News. "But this one is special. This guy is like family to me. And if I could help him, I would." Payton began working with Parcells in 2003, when he was hired as an offensive assistant with the Dallas Cowboys. The two have been close ever since and Payton, throughout his six seasons as New Orleans' head coach, has continued consulting his mentor on numerous matters, including how to handle preparations for the 2010 Super Bowl. However, the Saints must clear up several matters before they can choose an interim coach. They must not only decide whether to appeal, but would have to see if an appeal resulted in a reduced punishment. If Payton's punishment is upheld, the Saints could then proceed with finding an interim coach either from their own staff or outside the organization. If the Saints choose the latter approach and Parcells becomes a top candidate, the club would still have to interview a minority candidate under the NFL's "Rooney Rule." "I don't know how this is going to play out," Parcells, who was a Hall of Fame finalist this year, told the newspaper. "I really don't know anything about the situation. There's a lot of things going on here, and I would suspect it's going to take a while to all sort out." There are also three strong candidates among Saints assistants to take over as interim coach: offensive coordinator Pete Carmichael, defensive coordinator Steve Spagnuolo and offensive line coach Aaron Kromer. Payton expressed confidence in the abilities of his own assistants to compensate for his absence, but also has voiced some misgivings about saddling those coaches with additional responsibilities. "We feel like we've got a number of good candidates" on the staff, Payton said earlier this week at NFL meetings in Florida. "The trick then is what it does to affect their roles that they currently have." The appeal process itself, should Payton choose that route, is not expected to give him much additional time to work. Goodell has said he would expedite that process, indicating that it is highly unlikely Payton would be able to keep working through the draft in late April if he files an unsuccessful appeal. That is why Payton is spending long hours with Loomis, other coaches and scouts reviewing draft prospects this week. Payton said he has also laid out plans for the offseason training program and the beginning of training camp, up until the Saints play Arizona in the Hall of Fame game Aug. 5 in Canton, Ohio. If this is indeed Payton's final week of work in 2012, Loomis will be able to oversee the draft and handle other roster moves up until the season starts. Then he is slated to serve his eight-game suspension for failing to put a stop to the bounty system in a timely way. Assistant head coach Joe Vitt, who also coaches linebackers, is facing a six-game suspension. The NFL's investigation in New Orleans found that Payton initially lied to league investigators about the existence of a bounty and instructed his defensive assistants to do the same. Payton twice apologized for his role in an enterprise that offered payouts for knocking out opponents, saying he takes "full responsibility" for a system that operated for three years under his watch. The NFL has said as many as 27 players also could be sanctioned for their role in the scandal.

Amid signs his job might be in trouble, Julien says: 'I'm not quitting on this team'

Amid signs his job might be in trouble, Julien says: 'I'm not quitting on this team'

BRIGHTON, Mass – Roughly 12 hours after embattled Bruins coach Claude Julien bristled at a question about his job security and labeled it “shock journalism” in the heat of the moment after a tight loss to the Blackhawks, the B’s bench boss delivered a classy, heartfelt response to the same question.

Julien was asked about it in French by a reporter from the Montreal Gazette, but answered in English because of the “loyalty he feels to the people in Boston.”

In essence, Julien basically said he should be relieved of his duties if he’s deemed to be behind what ails the Black and Gold, but he’s going to keep working to fix things until that day comes.

It was exactly the kind of response you would expect from a coach who's taken the B’s to the mountaintop in his 10 years running the team and will always be respected and loved in Boston long after his coaching days are done.

“How do I deal with all of the rumors and all that is going on? I didn’t feel like [Friday night] was the appropriate time for me to answer that after a game where you’re emotions are pretty high. I wasn’t getting into that, but to be honest with you my job is to coach the hockey club,” said Julien. “Am I worried about my job? No, I’m not. Because it’s not my job to worry about it. My job is to fix things, and my job is to coach this team and do everything I can. If I become one of the reasons that we’re not doing well, then management has to make that decision.

“It’s not my decision to make. I’m not quitting on this team. I’m not quitting on anybody. I’m not quitting on management. I’m ready and willing to go through the hard times, and I said that at the end of last year. If it’s deemed my fault, then I shouldn’t be here, and that’s all I can say.”

While the Bruins roster is clearly less than perfect and has a larger dose of youthful players than in years past, Julien also freely admitted that they should be held to a higher standard after proving many nights that they should be a playoff team. That’s the mandate from Bruins ownership and that’s the challenge that Julien has willingly accepted.

It’s also the challenge that’s falling a bit short now as they’ve lost three crushing games in a row and have fallen behind the Ottawa Senators in the playoff standings, with Toronto also right behind them holding six games in hand.

“If we’re going with what we said we were going with and there’s going to be some growing pains along the way, so be it,” said Julien. “I think we put ourselves in a position earlier in the year where we could all of a sudden believe that we’re a playoff team...absolutely. I still think we’re a playoff team. Whether we can do it or not we’ll find out at the end of the year, but my job is to do everything I can to get us into the playoffs and that’s what I’m going to do.

“As far as the rumors are concerned, they’re out there and I know that. But I don’t worry about it because worrying is wasting a lot of my time. And my time is spent trying to fix things here.”

Julien and the Bruins are headed to Pittsburgh for a Sunday matinee against the Pittsburgh Penguins, and will have two games against the red-hot Pens headed into an All-Star break weekend that must feel like a well-earned oasis for Julien at this point in the season. 

Sox hope to bring David Ortiz back to Boston for new role

Sox hope to bring David Ortiz back to Boston for new role

MASHANTUCKET, Conn. -- David Oritz’s time in Boston as a player is over. He continues to say there’s no Brett Favre-type comeback, no matter how many people ask him.

However, that doesn’t mean his time with the Red Sox is over.

Sam Kennedy, Tom Werner and Dave Dombrowski are heading down to the Dominican Republic to tour the team’s academy on the island to see what changes, if any, need to be made.

Ortiz will join them on those tours.

“He’s just a good guy to go to the Dominican with,” Kennedy said. “We thought it’d be great to catch up. Haven’t seen him since before the holidays.”

But the front office members intend to exchange more than just pleasantries and stories from the holiday season. One goal on the trip is to bring Ortiz back to the organization as an employee.

“Yeah that’s something on the agenda,” Kennedy said. “We’re gonna talk about what he may or may not want to do. He did say after the season let’s just talk in January. He was so overwhelmed and tired so it’s a good time to start those conversations.

“I know he has a lot of plans, broadcasting, a lot of businesses he’s involved with and we’ll see what he’s up to. But we hope to cement something so he’s a part of the organization.”

What role that is yet to be determined. Assuming he doesn’t pursue a broadcasting career.

“I truly don’t know what’s on his mind,” Kennedy said. “He’ll obviously be good at whatever he decides to do, but I would hope that we could create a role where he has influence in the baseball operations side, he has influence in marketing, as an ambassador. A lot of our alums we’ve found really enjoy working with young players. Pedro [Martinez] is a perfect example of that.

“So we’ll see what he’s interested in doing, but I have heard him talk about broadcasting in the past and I think he’d be great at it if he decides to do it.”