Why Vlad Guerrero has turned himself in to police

728588.jpg

Why Vlad Guerrero has turned himself in to police

From Comcast SportsNet
SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic (AP) -- Former major leaguer Vladimir Guerrero said he has turned himself over to police in the Dominican Republic after reportedly being involved in a scuffle with a police officer in a disco. In a phone interview with The Associated Press, Guerrero denied he was involved in any attack. "At no time did I attack anyone, nor was I fleeing," he told the AP. "I presented myself at the jail last night after the complaint from the disco, and this morning first thing I went to the police that are handling the case." A spokesman for the police in the Dominican Republic, Maximo Baez Aybar, said no charges have been filed against Guerrero. Baez Aybar, however, maintained that Guerrero was involved in a physical encounter with police officer Renato Pena Rojas. "Mr. Vladimir Guerrero physically attacked Major Renato Pena Rojas after a brawl broke out in the disco in Nizao," Baez Aybar said. "We ask that he turned himself in so the case can be put in the hands of the justice system." The altercation took place in Nizao, which is located about 65 kilometers (40 miles) southwest of the Dominican capital Santo Domingo. "All that is being alleged is false. Vladimir did not attack anyone -- absolutely no one," his lawyer Polivio Rivas told the AP. "We're going to follow the process, but everything will be cleared up." Guerrero is a free agent after finishing last season with the Baltimore Orioles.

First impressions from Red Sox' 8-3 win over Rockies

red_sox_ortiz_betts_052416.jpg

First impressions from Red Sox' 8-3 win over Rockies

First impressions from the Red Sox' 8-3 win over the Colorado Rockies:

 

The Red Sox continue to use Fenway as their own little offensive playground.

Since April 20, the Red Sox are averaging exactly eight runs per game at home. That's just over a month of the covering 18 games.

They've also collected 10 or more hits in 16 of those 18 games, utilizing every bit of the field.

For the last two seasons, Fenway stopped being a tough place to play for opponents. But at home this year, the Sox have outscored opponents by 67 runs.

 

All of a sudden, the Red Sox are a triples team and Fenway is a triples haven.

A triple by Christian Vazquez - of all people -- gave the Red Sox a league-high 13 triples this season.

Fenway has a reputation for being a doubles park, but the ballpark has been home to 12 triples in 26 games - five by visiting teams and seven by the Red Sox. That translates into almost one every two games.

 

David Price was solid, but not spectacular.

The positives: Price got through the seventh inning for the fifth time this season. He walked just one and fanned six in seven innings.

He was hit hard a few times, with a homer into the visitor's bullpen allowed to Charlie Blackmon and a triple to the triangle for Carlos Gonzalez.

Consider it another step forward for Price, but it fell far short of dominant.

 

Koji Uehara's deception is heightened against teams that don't see him much.

Uehara allowed a leadoff single to D.J. LeMahieu, but then fanned three in a row, finishing each hitter off with his trademark split-finger fastball.

That pitch can be tough to recognize for hitters who see it a few times per season. For those in the National League who are largely unfamiliar with Uehara's splitter, it's apparently some sort of Kryptonite.