Wednesday's Sports In Brief

Wednesday's Sports In Brief
February 7, 2013, 3:34 am
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CYCLING

AUSTIN, Texas (AP) Lance Armstrong was given more time to think about whether he wants to cooperate with the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency. Separately, he learned that he's about to be sued.

USADA, the agency that investigated the cyclist's performance-enhancing drug use and banned him for life from sports, has given him an extra two weeks to decide if he'll speak with investigators under oath. The agency has said cooperating in its cleanup effort is the only path to Armstrong getting his ban reduced. The agency extended its original Wednesday deadline to Feb. 20.

Earlier in the day, SCA Promotions in Dallas said it will sue Armstrong on Thursday to recover more than $12 million it paid him in bonuses for winning the Tour de France seven times.

NFL

GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP) - Donald Driver found a way to retire in style.

The popular Green Bay Packers wide receiver celebrated his 14-year career during an event at Lambeau Field with family, friends, a handful of teammates and 1,500 fans who filled the atrium and lined balconies to get a glimpse of him.

Driver had 743 catches for 10,137 yards after making the team as a seventh-round draft pick out of Alcorn State in 1999.

Driver praised the fans who stood in line in subzero temperatures last week for a chance to get tickets to the event, and team president Mark Murphy said it was the first time in franchise history that a player had held a public retirement news conference.

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) - Of the many hats that jack-of-all-trades specialist Brad Smith wears playing for the Buffalo Bills, none of them happen to be designed by Tommy Hilfiger.

That's about to change.

The Bills receiver, part-time quarterback and kickoff returner is preparing to expand his already versatile repertoire. Smith is going to try his hand at journalism and style, working as an intern for Men's Health Magazine to assist covering New York Fashion Week, which opens Thursday.

Men's Health fashion director Brian Boye hired Smith because of the enthusiasm he showed in applying for the position, and not merely as a public-relations stunt.

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NBA

NBA Commissioner David Stern said that the group that has reached agreement to purchase the Sacramento Kings has formally filed to relocate the franchise to Seattle.

Stern spoke in Minneapolis before the Timberwolves hosted San Antonio. He called the Seattle group, led by Chris Hansen and Steve Ballmer, ``very strong,'' and said the appropriate committees have been convened to look over the proposed sale of the Kings and the prospective move to Seattle.

The deadline for teams to file for relocation is March 1. It's been expected that the Hansen/Ballmer group would file to move the team, but Stern's comments were the first time that decision has been verified.

MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - Commissioner David Stern says he thinks the NBA is on track to begin testing its players for human growth hormone, perhaps as early as next season.

Stern met with media in Minneapolis and said the league is watching developments in the NFL and Major League Baseball as those two leagues try to address testing for HGH. He says if both leagues get approval to test players, as he expects them to, the NBA will be right there behind them.

Stern says ``It's not a commitment, not a promise'' to have it in place next season. He praised players on their willingness to address drug testing and says ``We're well on our way.''

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YOUTH SPORTS

WASHINGTON (AP) - Student athletes need access to health care professionals, better-trained coaches and up-to-date equipment, a coalition of groups recommended in a call to action aimed at protecting the almost 8 million students participating in high school sports each year.

The Youth Sports Safety Alliance of more than 100 organizations released the proposed rules, which call for health providers such as athletic trainers or doctors available for every school, warnings about performance-enhancing substances for athletes and the creation of a national registry to track student athlete deaths. The rules also would require schools to have clean and well-maintained facilities, and require students to have a pre-season physical exam, including testing for some of the 400,000 concussions students suffer annually.

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BASEBALL

BIDDEFORD, Maine (AP) - A rare 148-year-old baseball card discovered at a rural Maine yard sale has been auctioned for $92,000.

Saco River Auction Co. in Biddeford held an auction that included a card depicting the Brooklyn Atlantics amateur baseball club. Troy Thibodeau, manager and auctioneer at Saco River Auction, said bidding started at $10,000 and quickly rose to the final $92,000.

The name of the buyer, who was at the auction house, was not released.

The card isn't the same as a modern-day baseball card, which became common in the 1880s. Rather, it's an original photograph from 1865 mounted on a card, showing nine players and a manager.

The Library of Congress said last month it was aware of only two copies of the photo. The other is in the institution's collection.

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BOXING

SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP) - Puerto Rico police said forensic evidence has cleared two men suspected in the killing of popular boxer Hector ``Macho'' Camacho.

Police spokesman Alex Diaz told The Associated Press that evidence also showed the suspects' impounded car was not used in the crime. No one has been charged in the Nov. 20 shooting of 50-year-old Camacho and his friend, 49-year-old Adrian Mojica Moreno.

The two were attacked while sitting in a car in the northern city of Bayamon. Officers found nine small bags of cocaine in Mojica's pocket, and a 10th bag open inside the car.

Mojica died at the scene, while the boxer died three days later after being removed from life support. Camacho won super lightweight, lightweight and junior welterweight world titles and had a career record of 79-6-3.