Vigil held for four New Jersey teen football players

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Vigil held for four New Jersey teen football players

From Comcast SportsNet Monday, August 22, 2011
LINWOOD, N.J. (AP) -- As Chris Hickey thought about what she could say to comfort her daughter on the death of her schoolmates, she opened her mouth once, then twice, unable at first to put sound to words. She tried a third time, standing on the track of Mainland Regional High School Sunday night, a day after a crash on the Garden State Parkway killed four of the school's football players and injured four more. "I don't even know what to tell her," Hickey said about her daughter Lauren, a junior at the school, who was friends with two of the teens killed. "I don't even know how to make sense of it." Hickey was among more than 3,000 students, parents, teammates and community members who shared their communal grief Sunday at a vigil at the Linwood school. Standing in the mist under the same lights that typically illuminate Friday night games, mourners lit candles, hugged each other and laid flowers on the field. The eight boys, who ranged in age from 15 to 17, had been in an SUV Saturday morning on their way to meet other players at a favorite brunch spot in Mays Landing, when the driver, 17-year-old Casey Brenner of Northfield, apparently lost control as he turned a corner and approached heavy traffic. Sgt. Julian Castellanos, a state police spokesman, said the SUV overturned multiple times, ejecting two passengers. A passing car then struck one of the passengers. The four who survived had non-life-threatening injuries. At least three of the crash survivors were present at the vigil to mourn their friends, said Northfield Police Chief Robert James. Grief took many forms as students consoled each other and waited their turn to speak with the victims' families. One male student pulled off his shirt, revealing a freshly inked tattoo which said "Dean," a reference to 15-year-old Dean Khoury of Linwood, one of the players who died in the crash. Others wore white homemade T-shirts reading "my boys" and "see you on the other side." And a few sat silently on the grass of the football field, their heads bowed into their hands, seemingly oblivious to the thousands of people milling about around them. "Right when it happened, I was in total shock, I was just praying it wasn't true," said Joey Geiger, 16, a member of the football team who was not involved in the accident. "Every single play (this season) is now for them." Team members could be seen huddling with each other in their green jerseys or crying alongside fellow students. Most declined to talk to reporters. "I wish we could take it all back -- all of it," said another team member who declined to elaborate or to provide his name out of sensitivity for the other players. State police said Sunday the investigation was ongoing. They did not release details about the speed of the SUV before the crash or whether the students were wearing seatbelts. Under New Jersey law, drivers under 18 generally are not allowed to carry more than one passenger unless a parent or guardian is in the vehicle. At the center of the mass that swarmed the field after brief comments by school leaders was a set of photographs of the four who died in the crash: Khoury, Brenner, and 16-year-olds Edgar Bozzi of Somers Point and Nicholas Conner of Northfield. In the photos, the players stand against a white wall in team jerseys, with overlapped hands resting at their waist and determined looks on their faces. Earlier Sunday, school superintendent Thomas Baruffi said the four players who died were good students, good athletes and well-liked. He said he has had students die before, but never multiple deaths at the same time. "They're always tragic," he said. "You know there's nothing you can say or do that's enough." The injured students included Linwood residents Jacob Smith and Kenneth Randall, both 15, and Northfield residents Kyle Beattie and Alex Denafo, both 16. The first game of the season for the Mustangs, who have won six state championships, is scheduled for Sept. 9 -- three days before the start of the school year for Mainland's 1,600 students.

Wednesday, Jan. 18: Landeskog wants to stay in Colorado

Wednesday, Jan. 18: Landeskog wants to stay in Colorado

Here are all the links from around the hockey world, and what I’m reading while thoroughly enjoying Nick Offerman co-hosting on the Today Show this morning.

*Gabriel Landeskog knows his name has been mentioned in trade rumors with teams like the Bruins, but he wants to stay with the Colorado Avalanche.

*The New York Rangers are facing a goalie crisis for the first time in 11 years as Henrik Lundqvist is beginning to show signs of hockey mortality.

*PHT writer James O’Brien has the New York Islanders seeking to speak with fired Florida coach Gerard Gallant about their new opening after firing Jack Capuano.

*Ondrej Pavelec has been brought back from the AHL to Winnipeg to rescue the Jets from their goaltending situation, and he wants to stay for as long as he can.

*Rene Bourque has reached the 700 game mark in his NHL career with the Colorado Avalanche, and he hopes to keep it going.

*Young star Jack Eichel’s hunger for greatness could certainly lend itself to a leadership role with the Buffalo Sabres

*For something completely different: Hollywood is thinking of rebooting “White Men Can’t Jump” and this is simply the worst idea ever. I’d rather watch a movie with Woody and Snipes 25 years later than a lame reboot.

 


 

Mike Gorman: 'No thanks on Carmelo Anthony to the Celtics'

Mike Gorman: 'No thanks on Carmelo Anthony to the Celtics'

The New York Knicks arrive in Boston tonight with the accompanying "Melo-drama" of Carmelo Anthony's disintegrating relationship with team president Phil Jackson.

Anthony would have to waive his no-trade clause to leave New York and Boston has been an oft-rumored destination. 

On "The Toucher and Rich Show", the longtime voice of the Celtics, Mike Gorman, said he hopes it doesn't happen. 

"I don't get it. I don't see it," Gorman said. "He's a ball stopper. One of the things that always intrigued me about Carmelo is when he's played with Team USA or an Olympic team, often he's the best player. Then you go and see him in a regular-season game and you say, 'Oh no, no."'