Tom Coughlin is not happy with Pierre-Paul video

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Tom Coughlin is not happy with Pierre-Paul video

From Comcast SportsNet
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) -- Tom Coughlin talked about the usual pros and cons after watching the video of the Giants' preseason win over the Jets, and the report on injuries to running back Ahmad Bradshaw and rookie cornerback Jayron Hosley seemed OK. What the Giants coach had a problem with Sunday was a video of Pro Bowl defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul throwing second-year cornerback Prince Amukamara into an ice bath at training camp at the University at Albany. It was tweeted by punter Steve Weatherford before Saturday's 26-3 win over the Jets, and it contains some inappropriate language. The incident also could be considered either hazing -- although that's odd for a second-year player -- or even bullying. Some might explain it as camp bonding, but Amukamara doesn't look amused. Neither was Coughlin. "I'm learning about that today," Coughlin said. "I really didn't have any information about that until maybe an hour ago, an hour before this conference call. I'm going to look into it; I'm going to talk to the parties involved." It was not clear whether Coughlin had seen the video of Pierre-Paul carrying a non-resistant Amukamara through a hallway as teammates followed, some shouting inappropriate comments. Once Pierre-Paul reaches the ice tubs he seems to fling Amukamara into the water. The cornerback gets out of the water quickly but the look on his face suggests he is upset. "Anything that occurs within this family or within our group should not be a part of any social media aspect," Coughlin said. "I'm going to address that strongly, and I've spent a little time on that this preseason, but I'll look into it further." Giants players were off Sunday. Amukamara told the Star-Ledger of Newark after the game that he was confused getting thrown into the bath since he was no longer a rookie, but he said: "I know it's all love. Yeah, no one ever likes it, especially when it's you vs. eight and no one's helping you. But it doesn't mess up our team morale or anything." While the video attracted the most attention Sunday, the good news for the Super Bowl champions (No. 3 in the AP Pro32) was that Bradshaw seemingly has only a bruised right hand after it hit a helmet and popped a cyst on his hand in the process. Hosley, who made the biggest play of the game returning a second-quarter interception 77 yards for a touchdown, has a case of turf toe on his right foot. It was in a cast after the game. "Hopefully nothing will turn up in terms of all the tests, and then it's going to be something that is going to be very sore," Coughlin said. "There's no doubt. How he is able to deal with it will indicate how fast he can get back on the practice field." Hosley was on the field for only seven plays. The third-round draft pick out of Virginia Tech did not know on which play he was hurt. If there was an area of concern for the Giants, it was their running game, which finished last in the league in 2011. They gained 58 yards on 32 carries, a horrible 1.8-yard average. Coughlin said the Jets used a lot of fronts, more than he expected for a preseason game. "That's going to be very helpful," Coughlin said. "I didn't like it, a lot of it, and we certainly had our share of mistakes, and our second and third guys were kind of swimming a little bit. But I don't think there's any question about the value of it. Having experienced it this early in the season, the benefit will be going forward." Coughlin was not sure how long linebacker Mark Herzlich (hip pointer) and defensive end Adrian Tracy (minor hamstring) would be sidelined.

Red Sox celebration quickly washes away walk-off loss

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Red Sox celebration quickly washes away walk-off loss

NEW YORK -- It had the potential to be the most awkward celebration ever.

In the top of the ninth inning at Yankee Stadium, before their game was complete, the Red Sox became American League East champions, by virtue of one other division rival -- Baltimore -- coming back to beat another -- Toronto -- in the ninth inning.

That eliminated the Blue Jays from the division race, and made the Sox division champs.

But that ninth inning reversal of fortune was about to visit the Red Sox, too.

Craig Kimbrel faced four hitters and allowed a single and three straight walks, leading to a run. When, after 28 pitches, he couldn't get an out, he was lifted for Joe Kelly, who recorded one out, then yielded a walk-off grand slam to Mark Teixeira.

The Yankees celebrated wildly on the field, while the Red Sox trudged into the dugout, beset with mixed emotions.

Yes, they had just lost a game that seemed theirs. But they also had accomplished something that had taken 158 games.

What to do?

The Sox decided to drown their temporary sorrows in champagne.

"As soon as we got in here,'' said Jackie Bradley Jr., "we quickly got over it.''

From the top of the eighth until the start of the bottom of the ninth, the Red Sox seemed headed in a conventional celebration.

A two-run, bases-loaded double by Mookie Betts and a wild pitch -- the latter enabling David Ortiz to slide into home and dislodge the ball from former teammate Tommy Layne's glove --- had given the Sox a 3-0 lead.

Koji Uehara worked around a walk to post a scoreless walk and after the top of the ninth, the Sox called on Craig Kimbrel, who had successfully closed out all but two save opportunities all season.

But Kimbrel quickly allowed a leadoff single to Brett Gardner and then began pitching as though he forgot how to throw strikes. Three straight walks resulted in a run in and the bases loaded.

Joe Kelly got an out, but then Teixeira, for the second time this week, produced a game-winning homer in the ninth. On Monday, he had homered in Toronto to turn a Blue Jays win into a loss, and now, here he was again.

It may have been a rather meaningless victory for the Yankees -- who remain barely alive for the wild card -- but it did prevent them the indignity of watching the Red Sox celebrate on their lawn.

Instead, the Sox wore the shame of the walk-off -- at least until they reached their clubhouse, where the partying began in earnest.

It had taken clubhouse attendants less than five minutes to cover the floor and lockers with plastic protective sheets. In a matter of a few more minutes, the air was filled with a mix of beer and bubbly.

President of baseball operations Dave Dombrowski wore a goggles and only socks on his feet.

As the spray reached every inch of the clubhouse, David Ortiz exclaimed: "I'm going to drown in this man.''

Defeat? What defeat?

 

Czarnik 'playing bigger' while looking to secure job with Bruins

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Czarnik 'playing bigger' while looking to secure job with Bruins

It’s not difficult to see why Austin Czarnik might have been a little overlooked headed into this Bruins training camp when forecasting favorites among the forwards to win a roster spot on the big club. After all he’s only 5-foot-9 and 167-pounds coming off just one very solid season at the AHL level for the Providence Bruins, and there are bigger, stronger forwards candidates that maybe rank a bit higher on the prospect list than him.

But the 23-year-old Czarnik put together an excellent training camp last fall before finishing with 20 goals and 61 points for the P-Bruins last season, and now he’s doing the exact same thing again this time around.

“Yeah, I feel more comfortable. I think we could have been a lot better in a lot of areas. Overall I think everyone is just happy to be back on the ice,” said Czarnik, who along with Frank Vatrano was one of the real starts of camp last season. “You know that type of mentality and you know mistakes are going to happen, and you’ve just got to move forward from it so everyone’s happy to be back.”

The former Miami University star is clearly happy to be back, and it’s showing on the ice with each chance he gets to show his tenacity, withering fore-check and his willingness to crash the net despite his smallish stature.

Czarnik was one of the most dangerous forwards on the ice for the Black and Gold in their preseason opener, and collected a key assist on Boston’s first goal of the game when he pushed a puck through the neutral zone before setting up on odd man rush for Jimmy Hayes and Jake DeBrusk.

This time around Czarnik scored the game’s only goal on a nifty rush during four-on-four play through the offensive zone by Ryan Spooner, who drew in the defense and dished to Czarnik for a wide open tap-in chance.

So it’s a couple of big plays in each of the first two preseason games that led to goals, and a genuinely excellent level of play throughout both contests. It’s something the Bruins coaching staff has taken note of along with his skating speed and hardnosed mentality, and now they have to figure if it fits in with their other NHL pieces.

“We were just talking about it. Everybody has that same feeling. He’s playing well. He moves well. He’s on the puck. He competes, and that’s the thing you’re looking for really,” said Bruins assistant coach Joe Sacco. “Like right now, we know there’s going to be mistakes made by a lot of our players, especially the younger ones.

“We’re looking to see who’s got that competitive, you know, that competitive fire. [We’re looking for] who’s going to go out there and who can compete at a high level. I know he’s not big in stature, but he plays bigger than he is. He’s had two pretty good games so far.”

Czarnik had a couple of good games early in B’s camp last year before flat-lining a bit at the end when the NHL jobs were seriously on the line, and the 23-year-old wants that story to change endings this time around. It remains to be seen where he’s going to fit as yet another center among Boston’s group of training camp players this month, but Czarnik might just force the Bruins to make a tough decision if he keeps playing at his current high level.