Theory: Lucchino has Henry duped

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Theory: Lucchino has Henry duped

By Adam Hart
CSNNE.com

Who's ready for some irresponsible journalism?

Kidding. What Wicked Good Sports does isn't journalism. It's make believe. Which brings us to the following, "an interesting set of theories."

What if Larry Lucchino has John Henry duped?

Henry told Felger & Mazz neither "John, Tom or Larry" were direct sources for The Boston Globe's Inside The Collapse piece. He falsely cited reporter Bob Hohler as publicly ruling them out as his sources. Henry rejected the possibility Lucchino leaked personal information about Terry Francona. Then turned and said:

"One of the first things that I learned when I came here, Larry Lucchino said, 'There are no secrets in baseball.'"

Especially if Lucchino is the leak Roto-Rooter couldn't fix. And that can lead us to only one theory: Larry Lucchino has John Henry living in a cocoon of false reality.

But why? To secure his financial backing in a plot to wrest the Red Sox from Rich Levine & Co., of course.

Imaginary scene 1: Henry walks through the Red Sox clubhouse and raises an eyebrow at the empty beer bottles and grease-lined cartons of fried chicken. Lucchino corrects him; they are in the visitors' clubhouse.

Imaginary scene 2: Henry questions the exorbitant price of beer at Fenway Park. Lucchino assures him the prices are necessary to skirt prohibition laws.

Imaginary scene 3: Henry balks at entering a pact with LeBron James, believing he once heard Boston fans boo him. Lucchino hires an actor to play a doctor. It is determined Henry has a hearing problem.

Imaginary scene 4: Henry expresses disinterest in purchasing Liverpool because "Americans don't care about soccer." Lucchino, using a crudely drawn map, convinces him Liverpool is a town in Massachusetts -- seven-hours away via flight. "See, err ehh, Red Sox Nation, err, loves soccer or, ehhh, football as they call it."

Imaginary scene 5: Henry is hand-delivered his newspaper by Lucchino each morning:

Yeah. An interesting set of theories.

Thomas strains right groin, says he'll 'be fine for Wednesday'

Thomas strains right groin, says he'll 'be fine for Wednesday'

The bumps and bruises continue to pile up for Isaiah Thomas, adding a new one to the group during Boston’s 107-106 loss at Houston. 
 
The 5-foot-9 guard said he strained his right groin in the second quarter, but added that the injury won’t force him to miss any games. 
 
“I’ll be alright,” Thomas told reporters after the loss. “I’ll get treatment. I’ll be fine for Wednesday (against Orlando).”
 
The injury appeared to have happened shortly after Houston’s Trevor Ariza hit a 3-pointer that put the Rockets ahead 55-45.
 
At the time it didn’t seem all that serious as Thomas, who had 20 points on the night, came down and drained a 3-pointer. 
 
But after the game, Thomas acknowledged his groin did bother him during the game in which he played 33-plus minutes. 
 
“A few drives I didn’t have the lift,” said Thomas, who finished with 20 points. “It is what it is. I’ll figure it out.”
 
Thomas, who played in all 82 regular season games last season in addition to each of Boston’s 21 games this season, has dealt with an assortment of injuries including but not limited to, a swollen middle finger injury on his left (shooting) hand. 
 
Thomas, an All-Star last season for the first time, has played at an elite level that should once again position him to be represent the Eastern Conference. 
 
Following Monday’s game, Thomas is averaging a career-high 26.0 points per game which ranks ninth in the NBA along with 6.1 assists. 

Smart: 'Can’t blame the officials for the outcome of the game'

Smart: 'Can’t blame the officials for the outcome of the game'

The fact that the James Harden of the Houston Rockets went to the free throw line 18 times which was more than the entire Celtics roster (12 free throw attempts total) certainly fired up conspiracy theorists among Celtics Nation. 
 
But what seemed to draw the most ire was what appeared to be a 3-pointer by Avery Bradley late in the fourth quarter that was initially called a long two-pointer. 
 
And after it was reviewed by the good folks in Secaucus, N.J., they allowed the ruling to stand because there wasn’t enough proof in the many replay angles for them to overturn the original call. 
 
The missed lay-ups by Al Horford and Isaiah Thomas in the closing seconds stand out, obviously. 
 
But the 3-pointer that wasn’t a 3-pointer was one of the more talked-about topics in the Celtics locker room afterwards. 
 
“From the angle we saw, it was a three,” Boston’s Marcus Smart told reporters after the game. “We definitely thought it was.”
 
Said Jae Crowder: “I thought it was a three. Nothing we can do about it now.”
 
It was that kind of game for the Celtics, one in which plays that could go either way more often than not, went against them. 
 
And while Bradley’s questionable two-pointer certainly was a factor in the game’s outcome, as was the free throw discrepancy and the late-game misses, ultimately the blame for Monday’s loss falls upon the Celtics players who were still in position to win despite all those setbacks.

They simply didn't get it done, when it mattered.
 
Smart, who had 13 points off the Celtics bench, understands that fans like to blame the officials when a game ends like Monday’s loss to Houston. 
 
“Officials, they did their job,” Smart said. “You can’t blame the officials for the outcome of the game. We made some costly plays down the stretch. Give credit to the Rockets. They made plays and executed down the stretch.”