Sure, Peyton, you TRIED to fail that test....

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Sure, Peyton, you TRIED to fail that test....

By Jon Fucile
WickedGoodSports.com

At the beginning of every season, each NFL player has to take a baseline concussion test. Basically the NFL has the players look at 20 pictures on a piece of paper then turn over the paper and draw as many of those 20 pictures as they can and they do the same test with 20 words.

If a player has a concussion during the season the NFL makes the player take the same test and if the player performs below what they did at the beginning of the season, the player must sit out until doctors deem he is ready. Or so the story goes.

Recently, however, Peyton Manning admitted to failing these baseline concussion tests on purpose so that if he sustained a concussion during the season and had to take the test again the bar would already be set low. You know, kind of like his playoff performances.

While the NFL is trying to make the game safer and protect players, Manning seems to be advocating failing on purpose, just in case.

But is Manning failing on purpose? Or is he just really not that bright?

Based on family history, it is probably the latter.

There was that one family Christmas when the Mannings invited Tom Brady over and Peyton just had to prove he was smarter than Tom Brady. Brady pet Peyton that he couldnt get his giant head through the railing on the stairs.

Oh, that whacky Tom.

It is not just Peyon that is this dumb. Eli is not exactly joining MENSA any time soon. Ever wonder why he has that really dumb look on his face all the time? Well, an unfortunate incident when he was youngerwell, see for yourself.

Poor Archie Manning. He has two idiots for kids. It is partially his fault though. When his kids were younger he was too busy being a mediocre quarterback to tell his kids they were reading books the wrong way.

This issue was compounded when older brother Peyton tried to teach younger brother Eli how to read.

Even when the Mannings try to do a good deed they screw it up. Peyton was trying to help a local school, but apparently he was too used to purposely failing concussion tests that he screwed that up, too.

Hey, Peyton, dont worry about that. Here, well give you a chance to redeem yourself. How do you spell clutch?

Ill even use it in a sentence: When Peyton Manning is in a big game, his favorite clutch move is:

Wellat least you were partially correct.

In fifteen years when Peyton Manning is having trouble remembering his own name and doing interviews about how the NFL should have done more about concussions maybe someone can remind him of the times he purposely failed baseline concussion tests. Great example youre setting for the young kids too Peyton. Seriously. Great job. Idiot.

Then again, Manning has never done well under pressure so many he is just embarrassed that he keeps failing these tests and is pretending he did it on purpose.

Kevin Walsh: An unforgettable encounter with Arnold Palmer

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Kevin Walsh: An unforgettable encounter with Arnold Palmer

With the passing of Arnold Palmer, CSN's Kevin Walsh looks back on an unforgettable encounter he had with the golf legend

It was May 2000.  I had just finished playing golf at Pebble Beach.  I walked out of the clubhouse and a Lincoln Town Car pulled up to the putting green, Arnold Palmer hopped out. It was as if he’d fallen out of the sky. 

I had my tape recorder with me and asked if I could ask him a few questions about being a caddy in his younger years in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. 

“Yes, but I have only about five minutes,” he said.

I was very nervous and having trouble putting the cassette tape into the recorder.  He eventually took it out of my hands and did it for me. 

My nerves were gone.

So we’re talking and the door to The Lodge bursts open and a guy yells “Hey Arnold!  We’re in the bar having a beer!”

“Well,” Arnold yells back, “Order me one!”

Arnold was hard of hearing.  He saddled up next to me, and tilted his head so I could talk right into his ear. I couldn’t believe I was talking directly into Arnold Palmer’s ear. He was practically stepping on my feet. He wore tiny hearing aids that were only visible if you were as close as I was.

After ten minutes of talking, I reminded him that he had friends waiting, and a beer that was probably warm by that time.  He wanted to make sure that I had enough.  I did and I was beaming.  I’m not sure my feet touched the ground on the walk back to the car.  

Golf legend Arnold Palmer passes away at 87

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Golf legend Arnold Palmer passes away at 87

Arnold Palmer brought a country-club sport to the masses with a hard-charging style, charisma and a commoner's touch. At ease with both presidents and the golfing public, and on a first-name basis with both, "The King," died Sunday in Pittsburgh. He was 87.

Alastair Johnson, CEO of Arnold Palmer Enterprises, confirmed that Palmer died Sunday afternoon of complications from heart problems.

Palmer ranked among the most important figures in golf history, and it went well beyond his seven major championships and 62 PGA Tour wins. His good looks, devilish grin and go-for-broke manner made the elite sport appealing to one and all. And it helped that he arrived about the same time as television moved into most households, a perfect fit that sent golf to unprecedented popularity.

Beyond his golf, Palmer was a pioneer in sports marketing, paving the way for scores of other athletes to reap in millions from endorsements. Some four decades after his last PGA Tour win, he ranked among the highest-earners in golf.

On the golf course, Palmer was an icon not for how often he won, but the way he did it.