Some tenets of trash talking

473454.jpg

Some tenets of trash talking

By Mary Paoletti
CSNNE.com

I'm a big fan of trash talking in sports.

I do it a lot, especially during college basketball season.

Sometimes the payoff is sweetly satisfying -- like the wake of UConn's 2011 National title -- (WOOF). Other times -- like after 2010's brief NIT "run" -- you're left feeling bitter, angry and maybe a little foolish.

The topic comes to mind because things between the Boston and Tampa Bay crowds are getting ugly. And it should heat up; these fans are rooting for a trip to the Stanley Cup finals.

Unfortunately, I'm seeing some things I don't like. "Waitaminute," you say. "I thought anything goes in the world of smack-talk!"

Wrong. Trash-talking is also a game. There are winners, there are losers, and there are standards.

1. You shouldn't spit fire only when your team is tops.

Take, for example, the faithful fans of Tampa Bay's (Devil) Rays between 1998 and 2008.

There weren't any?

Oh. Okay. Well, let's look at '08. Tampa went 97-65 that season for the best record in the AL East. Boston's 95 wins had them at second. Fenway Park averaged 37, 632 fans getting drunk, making stupid signs and doing the wretched wave a game that season. The Rays? 22, 259. Great number, gang! Big cap-tip to those who gathered up their cowbells and trudged over to the Trop.

Even if numbers slip, you've got to work with what you've got. When the Rays traveled to Boston and crushed the Sox 10-3 in September of '08, some prideful townie in red stuck around and got a substantial chorus to chant something unkind about Evan Longoria's mother.

Hang tight.

2. Don't use history as ammo if your franchise doesn't have any.

This one's more a helpful hint than anything. It just sounds silly when somebody beats his chest and says, "RESPECT US. RESPECT OUR CLUB AS ONE OF THE FINEST TRADITIONS IN HOCKEY DESPITE THE FACT THAT EVERY PLAYER ON OUR ROSTER IS OLDER THAN THE FRANCHISE."

The other day I saw some Lightning fan waving Tampa's 2004 Stanley Cup around with words. Neat! Boston won Stanley Cup No. 1 (out of five) in its first 12 years as a hockey club, too. That was in 1928.

Might want to try a different approach.

3. Be prepared to get what you give.

Bruins marketing has used The Bear in ad campaigns for a few years now. His ads are lighthearted but pointed. Like this one:

Lightning fans could have responded in several ways.

A. Laughter and promises of a vengeful butt-kicking in Game 3.
B. Anger and promises of vengeful butt-kicking on the ice in Game 3.
C. A similar ad campaign that roasts Boston in a smart, fun way.
D. Indignation and whining.

Tampa chose 'D'. ProHockeyTalk.com It's unfortunate.

Boston's billboards were taken down due to complaints. Ringleader of the Dish-It, Don't-Take-It Crew is Tampa radio show host, Mike "Cowhead" Calta. The part I don't get? For someone supposedly offended by wit and humor, the guy's counter-attack was exponentially worse -- just hateful and disgusting. Beyond the comments NESN documented, Calta also called Bruins fans fgs and pssies via Twitter.

Hub hockey fans are going to respond in kind and it's not going to be pretty. Thing is, by setting such a disgusting and bigoted tone, he has surrendered his right to complain about anything anybody says to him in the future.

Best of luck, you jackhole.

4. If you make a bet you have to own up to it.

Tony Luke Jr. is a perfect example of this tenet.

Luke is a lover of all Philadelphia sports but I don't hate him because he's a stand-up guy. He made a bet with Bruins fan Kosta Diamontopolous during the Stanley Cup semifinals, lost it (like his Flyers lost the series and their pride) and made good on the deal.

Check it out:

An attitude like that gets you respect in this city.

Anybody who touts his or her team gets to gloat like hell after a win. The same people also have to know when they're beaten. Considering there are at least three more games to play in the Eastern Conference finals, I hope the fans figure it out fast.

We'll all have more fun that way.

Game notes: Celtics look to extend Kings’ Boston losing streak to nine

Game notes: Celtics look to extend Kings’ Boston losing streak to nine

BOSTON – Here are a few odds and ends to keep an eye on heading into tonight’s game against the Sacramento Kings: 
 
· The Celtics have won eight in a row over the Kings in Boston, with the last loss to Sacramento at the TD Garden coming on Jan. 19, 2007. Current Celtic Gerald Green was in the starting lineup that night. 

· Only six times in franchise history have the Celtics launched 38 or more 3-pointers in a game, four of which came in the month of November this season. 

· Speaking of 3-pointers, 36.2 percent of Boston’s shots are 3s. That ranks fifth in the league behind Houston, Cleveland, Brooklyn and Golden State.

· Don’t be surprised if Avery Bradley gets off to a good start tonight, especially from 3-point range. He’s shooting 59.1 percent on 3s in the first quarter which ranks second in the league. 

· Isaiah Thomas tallied 395 points scored in November, the most by a Celtic since John Havlicek had 406 points in November during the 1971-1972 season. 

· Boston leads the NBA in points scored (46.3 per game) by second-round picks. The Celtics’ second-round picks include Isaiah Thomas; Jae Crowder; Amir Johnson; Jonas Jerebko; Demetrius Jackson and Jordan Mickey.

· The Celtics are 5-0 this season when they outrebound an opponent. 

· Tonight’s game will be Boston’s fifth set of back-to-back games this season. In the first game, they are 3-1 this season. On the second night, they are 2-2.

Beyond the numbers: Kings offense will test Celtics defense

Beyond the numbers: Kings offense will test Celtics defense

BOSTON – When it comes to defense, the Celtics are quick to claim that it is indeed the foundation for which their team is built upon. 
 
Still, far too often this season, we have seen cracks in their usually Teflon-tough defense, the kind that ultimately means the difference between winning and losing.
 
The Celtics’ defense will once again need to step up and play well tonight against a Sacramento squad that has shown it can fill it up offensively of late. 
 
Sacramento (7-11) has scored 100 or more points in eight of their past 10 games. In that span, their 107.2 points per game ranks ninth in the league. 
 
In that same span, the Celtics have allowed opponents to score 100.3 points per game, which ranks 10th in the NBA in fewest points allowed.
 
And when it comes to winning, limiting teams to less than 100 points has been huge in Boston’s win total. 
 
The Celtics have held eight opponents to 100 points or less this season. 
 
Their record in those games? 8-0.
 
Within that limited scoring, Boston must also make sure teams don’t get into a nice groove shooting the ball. 
 
Boston is 0-5 this season when an opponent shoots 48 percent or better from the field. 
 
While there are several things Boston must do to be successful, having the right kind of defensive disposition ranks at or near the top of that list in their efforts to play with the kind of defensive success that gave so many hope that this would the year Boston would hold court among the top teams in the Eastern Conference.

“We have to get a little more nastier on the defensive end and not let a team come in and get comfortable,” said Boston’s Jae Crowder.